ENCOURAGEMENT TODAY, CONQUERING DOUBT PART 36




Your Lord Christ Jesus. 



PANDEMIC DISEASE 



IN ENGLISH AND SPANIH





08/12/20

Who is Jesus Christ?

Other than the most hardened skeptics, everyone agrees that Jesus Christ actually existed and walked the earth some 2000 years ago. Many believe He was a prophet, a good man, and also a great moral teacher. But, in the Bible we discover that Jesus Christ was far more than a good man, prophet, or teacher. What C.S. Lewis pointed out in his book Mere Christianity, a lot of people still say today, "I'm ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don't accept his claim to be God."

C.S. Lewis demonstrates the illogic of this standpoint by pointing out what Jesus said about Himself. If we don't believe what Jesus said, He was a lunatic or a liar. If either one of those are true, we have to even reject the prophet, teacher, and good man option. So, either Jesus Christ is God in human form as He claimed, or else the man Jesus was crazy or a liar. People in His day who refused to believe tried to shut Him up, too. They spit at Him, slapped His face, and said He was crazy. He no longer walks physically upon the earth among us, but we also spit, slap and ascribe lunacy to Him when we refuse to believe He is the Son of God, the Savior of all who will believe.

Jesus claimed to be God. In John 10:30 we read that He said, "I and the Father are one." Some would say, "Now that's crazy!" The Jews called it blasphemy. "The Jews answered him, 'It is not for a good work that we are going to stone you but for blasphemy, because you, being a man, make yourself God.'" (John 10:33). Jesus did not attempt to correct their understanding of what He said, demonstrating that they had understood Him correctly. Jesus had previously made another clear statement, recorded in John 8:58-59, "Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am." In that instance, the Jews tried to stone Him as well. They clearly understand that Jesus was using the "I Am" as an Old Testament title for God (see Exodus 3:14).

In John 1:1 we read, "the Word was God." Then in John 1:14 the Apostle John writes, "the Word became flesh" obviously meaning Jesus was God in the flesh. Later, the Apostle Thomas comes to the same realization and proclaims to Jesus, "My Lord, and my God!" (John 20:28). In Titus 2:13, the Apostle Paul calls Jesus "our great God and Savior Jesus Christ." The Apostle Peter said the same, "our God and Savior Jesus Christ" (2 Peter 1:1).

Why did God take on human form in the person of Jesus Christ? Our sin is ultimately committed against an infinite and eternal God, making it worthy of an infinite and eternal penalty - eternal death. Only God could pay such a penalty. God became a human being, in the person of Jesus Christ, so He could die in our place, paying the full penalty for our sin, thus providing salvation to all who receive Him (John 1:12). Because Jesus is God, He could proclaim, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me" (John 14:6).




¿Quién es Jesucristo?

Aparte de los escépticos más empedernidos, todos coinciden en que en realidad Jesucristo existió y estuvo en la tierra hace unos 2000 años. Muchos creen que fue un profeta, un buen hombre, y también un gran maestro moral. Pero, en la Biblia descubrimos que Jesucristo era mucho más que un buen hombre, profeta o maestro. Lo que C.S. Lewis señaló en su libro Mero Cristianismo, mucha gente sigue diciendo hoy: “Estoy listo para aceptar a Jesús como un gran maestro moral, pero no acepto su afirmación de ser Dios.”

C.S. Lewis demuestra la falta de lógica de este punto de vista al señalar lo que dijo Jesús acerca de sí mismo. Si no creemos lo que dijo Jesús, Él era un lunático o un mentiroso. Si cualquiera de esas son verdad, tenemos que rechazar las opciones incluso de sea profeta, maestro u hombre bueno. Así que, o Jesucristo es Dios en forma humana, como había afirmado, o de lo contrario el hombre Jesús era loco o un mentiroso. La gente en su día que se negaron a creer trataron de callarlo, también. Le escupieron, le dieron bofetadas, y dijeron que estaba loco. Él ya no camina físicamente sobre la tierra entre nosotros, pero también le escupimos, lo golpeamos y le atribuimos la locura a Él cuando nos negamos a creer que Él es el Hijo de Dios, el Salvador de todos los que creen.

Jesús afirmó ser Dios. En Juan 10:30 leemos que Él dijo, “El Padre y yo somos uno.” Algunos dirán, “¡Eso es una locura!” Los judíos dijeron que era blasfemia. Los judíos le respondieron, “No te apedreamos por ninguna de ellas (obras) sino por blasfemia; porque tú, siendo hombre, te haces pasar por Dios.” (Juan 10:33). Jesús no trató de corregir su comprensión de lo que dijo, lo que demuestra que ellos lo habían entendido bien. Antes Jesús había hecho otra declaración clara, registrada en Juan 8:58-59: “Ciertamente les aseguro que, antes de que Abraham naciera, ¡yo soy!” En esa instancia, los judíos trataron de apedrearlo también. Ellos entienden claramente que Jesús estaba usando el “Yo Soy” como título del Antiguo Testamento para Dios (véase Éxodo 3:14).

En Juan 1:1, leemos: “el Verbo era Dios.” Luego, en Juan 1:14 el apóstol Juan escribe: “el Verbo se hizo carne”, obviamente, indicando que Jesús era Dios en la carne. Más tarde, el apóstol Tomás llega a la misma conclusión y proclama a Jesús: “¡Señor mío, y Dios mío!” (Juan 20:28). En Tito 2:13, el apóstol Pablo llama a Jesús “nuestro gran Dios y Salvador Jesucristo.” El apóstol Pedro dijo lo mismo, “nuestro Dios y Salvador Jesucristo” (2 Pedro 1:1).

¿Por qué Dios tomó forma humana en la persona de Jesucristo? Nuestro pecado es cometido en última instancia contra un Dios infinito y eterno, por lo que es digno de un castigo infinito y eterno - la muerte eterna. Sólo Dios podría pagar esa pena. Dios tomó forma humana, en la persona de Jesucristo, para que pudiera morir en nuestro lugar, pagando plenamente el castigo por nuestro pecado, proporcionando así la salvación a todos los que lo reciben (Juan 1:12). Porque Jesús es Dios, Él pudo proclamar: “Yo soy el camino, la verdad y la vida. Nadie llega al Padre sino por mí.” (Juan 14:6)

¿Quién es Jesucristo? Dios en forma humana.




08/11/30


What is faith in Jesus? What does it mean to have faith in Jesus?


In order to understand what it means to have faith in Jesus, we must first understand the nature of faith itself. Faith contains three elements: knowledge, assent, and trust. 


Firstly, faith contains the element of knowledge. Faith must have content. There must be something or someone to have faith in. It is popular to say things like "have faith" or "believe" but these sayings are ambiguous, and even meaningless, until we define in what or whom we have faith. To have faith in Jesus, we must first have some knowledge about who He is. In order to have faith in Jesus we must know that He is the Christ, the promised Messiah, who came to earth to save His people from their sins (John 1:41Matthew 1:21). We must believe that Jesus is God's only Son (John 3:16) who took on human flesh (John 1:14), lived a life of perfect loving obedience to God the Father (John 4:34Hebrews 4:15), willingly sacrificed His life by dying on the cross for our sins (Philippians 2:8), rose triumphantly from the grave after three days (Matthew 12:40) and is now seated in heaven at the right hand of God (Acts 2:33) from whence He will return to judge the world (Acts 1:11John 5:28–29) and to bring to glory all who eagerly await His coming (Colossians 3:4Hebrews 9:28). Our knowledge of Jesus need not be exhaustive, nor can it be (Colossians 2:31 Corinthians 13:9), in order for us to believe in Him. However, we do need to know some essential truths about who He is and what He has done (John 20:31). 


Secondly, faith contains the element of assent. To assent means to agree that the knowledge we have is true. Now, we may be tempted to stop here and think we have arrived at a complete definition of faith. However, having knowledge about who Jesus is and even assenting to that knowledge does not mean a person has faith IN Jesus. For example, the Devil and demons know who Jesus is and even acknowledge who He is (Matthew 8:29Mark 1:24James 2:19) but they do not believe IN Him, which brings us to the final element. 


Thirdly, faith contains the element of trust. To have faith in Jesus means to trust Him. To have faith in Jesus means to rely on Him and resign oneself to Him. Those who have faith in Jesus rely on Him as Savior (John 4:42Titus 3:4) and resign themselves to Him as Lord (Romans 10:9). To trust in Jesus means to believe that His death was accepted by God as payment for your guilt and sin (Colossians 2:14), that His perfect life and righteousness has been credited to you on the basis of your faith in Him (Romans 3:21–22). To trust in Jesus is to believe that His teachings and promises are true and to resign ourselves to follow Him and live for Him (Matthew 10:37–3916:24–25Romans 12:1Philippians 1:21). 


A helpful analogy which sheds light on the difference between the second element of faith (assent) and the third element (trust) is as follows. If I were to show you a chair and ask you if you believe it would hold you, you may say you believe it would. You have assented. If I then ask you to sit in it and you do, you are trusting. You see the difference. Having faith in Jesus means not only agreeing with the fact that He can save, but trusting in Him that He both has and will save you. 


There are a couple things to remember about faith in Jesus that are vital to a humble recognition of God's work of grace in us and to a proper attitude of gratitude to Jesus Christ for who He is and what He has done. First, believing in Christ is a gift from God (Ephesians 2:8Acts 13:48) and not a reason for us to boast (1 Corinthians 4:7), as if we are better or smarter than others (1 Corinthians 1:26). If we indeed have faith in Jesus it is because God has given us the faith to believe. Secondly, it is Christ Himself, and not faith, that is the grounds for our salvation. Faith is merely the instrument through which we receive Jesus. Faith is akin to the tube which transports blood during a blood transfusion. It is the blood, not the tube, that saves the person's life. However, without the tube, the person would not receive the life-saving blood. Comparatively speaking, it is the blood of Jesus that saves us from our morbid sinful state (Ephesians 2:13Romans 3:25Colossians 1:20). Yet, faith is the instrument or means through which we receive Jesus and all His life-giving benefits (Romans 5:1–2Galatians 2:20John 3:15). 


If you have not yet put your trust in Jesus Christ and would like to, you can express your faith in Him by praying something like the following. The words of this prayer are not what will save you; this is simply a means of expressing your trust in Him. 


"Dear God, I know that I am a sinner and that apart from you I am deserving of eternal death. I believe that Jesus Christ is your Son, that He lived a perfect life, that He died on the cross to pay the penalty for my sin, and that He rose again victorious over sin and death. I want to put my faith in Jesus today. I rely on Him alone for salvation. Thank you for saving me. Thank you for forgiving me and bringing me into relationship with you. Help me to grow closer to you and to live for you." 




¿Qué es la fe en Jesús?


Para entender lo que significa tener fe en Jesús, primero debemos entender la naturaleza de la fe misma. La fe contiene tres elementos: conocimiento, asentimiento y confianza. 


En primer lugar, la fe contiene el elemento del conocimiento. La fe debe tener contenido. Debe haber algo o alguien en quien tener fe. Es popular decir cosas como "tener fe" o "creer", pero estos dichos son ambiguos e incluso sin sentido, hasta que definimos en qué o en quién tenemos fe. Para tener fe en Jesús, primero debemos tener algún conocimiento acerca de quién es Él. A fin de que tengamos fe en Jesús, debemos saber que Él es el Cristo, el Mesías prometido, que vino a la tierra para salvar a su pueblo de sus pecados (Juan 1:41; Mateo 1:21). Debemos creer que Jesús es el único Hijo de Dios (Juan 3:16) que tomó carne humana (Juan 1:14), vivió una vida de perfecta obediencia amorosa a Dios Padre (Juan 4:34; Hebreos 4:15), sacrificó voluntariamente su vida al morir en la cruz por nuestros pecados (Filipenses 2: 8), resucitó triunfalmente de la tumba después de tres días (Mateo 12:40) y ahora está sentado en el cielo a la diestra de Dios (Hechos 2:33 ) de donde volverá para juzgar al mundo (Hechos 1:11; Juan 5: 28–29) y para glorificar a todos los que esperan ansiosamente su venida (Colosenses 3: 4; Hebreos 9:28). Nuestro conocimiento de Jesús no necesita ser completo, aunque no puede serlo (Colosenses 2: 3; 1 Corintios 13: 9), para que podamos creer en Él. Sin embargo, necesitamos saber algunas verdades esenciales sobre quién es Él y lo que ha hecho (Juan 20:31). 


En segundo lugar, la fe contiene el elemento de asentimiento. Asentir significa estar de acuerdo en que el conocimiento que tenemos es verdadero. Ahora, podemos sentir la tentación de detenernos aquí y pensar que hemos llegado a una definición completa de fe. Sin embargo, tener conocimiento sobre quién es Jesús e incluso asentir a ese conocimiento no significa que una persona tenga fe en Jesús. Por ejemplo, el Diablo y los demonios saben quién es Jesús e incluso reconocen quién es Él (Mateo 8:29; Marcos 1:24; Santiago 2:19) pero no creen en Él, lo que nos lleva al elemento final. 


En tercer lugar, la fe contiene el elemento de confianza. Tener fe en Jesús significa confiar en él. Tener fe en Jesús significa confiar en él y rendirse ante él. Aquellos que tienen fe en Jesús confían en él como Salvador (Juan 4:42; Tito 3: 4) y se rinden ante él como Señor (Romanos 10: 9). Confiar en Jesús significa creer que su muerte fue aceptada por Dios como pago por tu culpa y pecado (Colosenses 2:14), que su vida perfecta y su justicia te han sido acreditadas sobre la base de tu fe en él (Romanos 3: 21-22). Confiar en Jesús es creer que sus enseñanzas y promesas son verdaderas y debemos renunciar a nosotros mismos para seguirlo y vivir para él (Mateo 10: 37-39; 16: 24-25; Romanos 12: 1; 1:21). 


Una analogía útil que arroja luz sobre la diferencia entre el segundo elemento de fe (asentimiento) y el tercer elemento (confianza) es la siguiente. Si te mostrara una silla y te preguntara si crees que te sostendría, podrías decir que crees que sí. Has asentido. Si luego te pido que te sientes y lo haces, estás confiando. ¿Ves la diferencia? Tener fe en Jesús significa no solo estar de acuerdo con el hecho de que él puede salvar, sino confiar también que él te ha salvado y te salvará. 


Hay un par de cosas para recordar acerca de la fe en Jesús que son vitales para un humilde reconocimiento de la obra de gracia de Dios en nosotros y para una actitud adecuada de gratitud a Jesucristo por quién es y lo que ha hecho. Primero, el creer en Cristo es un regalo de Dios (Efesios 2: 8; Hechos 13:48) y no una razón para que nos jactemos (1 Corintios 4: 7), como si fuéramos mejores o más inteligentes que otros (1 Corintios 1: 26). Si realmente tenemos fe en Jesús es porque Dios nos ha dado la fe para creer. En segundo lugar, es Cristo mismo, y no la fe, el fundamento de nuestra salvación. La fe es simplemente el instrumento a través del cual recibimos a Jesús. La fe es similar al tubo que transporta sangre durante una transfusión de sangre. Es la sangre, no el tubo, lo que salva la vida de la persona. Sin embargo, sin el tubo, la persona no recibiría la sangre que salva vidas. Comparativamente hablando, es la sangre de Jesús la que nos salva de nuestro estado mórbido y pecaminoso (Efesios 2:13; Romanos 3:25; Colosenses 1:20). Sin embargo, la fe es el instrumento o medio a través del cual recibimos a Jesús y todos sus beneficios vivificantes (Romanos 5: 1–2; Gálatas 2:20; Juan 3:15). 


Si aún no has confiado en Jesucristo y te gustaría hacerlo, puedes expresar tu fe en él orando algo como lo siguiente. Las palabras de esta oración no son lo que te salvará; esto es simplemente un medio de expresar tu confianza en él. 


"Querido Dios, sé que soy un pecador y que, aparte de ti, merezco la muerte eterna. Creo que Jesucristo es tu Hijo, que vivió una vida perfecta, que murió en la cruz para pagar la pena por mi pecado, y que resucitó victorioso sobre el pecado y la muerte. Quiero poner mi fe en Jesús hoy. Confío solo en él para la salvación. Gracias por salvarme. Gracias por perdonarme y traerme a una relación contigo. Ayúdame a acercarme a ti y vivir para ti ".





08/10/20


What is sanctification?


Many Christians refer to a progression of justification, sanctification, and glorification. Justification refers to the fact that believers have been deemed legally righteous. With Christ's death and resurrection, our sin was forgiven and we are now pure before God (2 Corinthians 5:21Romans 5:1Romans 6). While we know that our salvation is complete, there are still aspects of our salvation that are being worked out. We are righteous, and we are also becoming righteous. This "becoming righteous" is referred to as sanctification. Sanctification is where our present realities fall in line with our eternal status.


In one sense, the Christian life is all about sanctification. Christ is finishing the good work that He began in us (Philippians 1:6). We are continually learning to follow God's ways and discard our sinful natures (Ephesians 4:22-24Colossians 3:5-17). Paul wrote to the church in Ephesus, "I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called" (Ephesians 4:1). We have been declared holy and now attempt to live holy lives (Matthew 5:48). As Christians, we are to cooperate with God's work in us. He refines and prunes us (Zechariah 13:9Malachi 3:2Isaiah 48:101 Peter 1:7John 15:2), and sanctification is one name for that work. 


Glorification is our eternal state. The legal reality of our justification and the physical reality of our sanctification now match up. In glorification we are with Christ and made completely perfect (1 John 3:2Colossians 1:27Colossians 3:4).


¿Qué es la sanctificación según la Biblia?


Muchos Cristianos se refieren a una progresión de justificación, santificación y glorificación. La Justificación se refiere al hecho de que creyentes han sido declarados legalmente justos. Con la muerte de Cristo y su resurrección, nuestros pecados fueron perdonados y ahora somos puros ante Dios (2 Corintios 5:21; Romanos 5:1; Romanos 6). Mientras sabemos que nuestra salvación está completa, siguen partes de nuestra salvación que se están ajustando. Somos justos y también nos estamos volviendo justos. Esto de “volviéndonos justos” se refiere a la santificación. La santificación es donde nuestras realidades actuales se ordenan con nuestro estatus eterno. 


De una manera, la vida Cristiana se trata toda de la santificación. Cristo está terminando el trabajo que empezó dentro de nosotros (Filipenses 1:6). Estamos continuamente aprendiendo a seguir los caminos de Dios y deshacernos de nuestra naturaleza pecaminosa (Efesios 4:22-24; Colosenses 3:5-17). Pablo le escribió a la iglesia en Éfeso, “Por eso yo, que estoy preso por la causa del Señor, les ruego que vivan de una manera digna del llamamiento que han recibido” (Efesios 4:1). Hemos sido declarados santos y ahora intentamos vivir vidas santas (Mateo 5:48). Como Cristianos, debemos cooperar con el trabajo de Dios dentro de nosotros. Nos refina y nos poda (Zacarías 13:9; Malaquías 3:2; Isaías 48:10; 1 Pedro 1:7; Juan 15:2), y la santificación es el nombre de ese trabajo. 


La glorificación es nuestro estado eterno. La realidad legal de nuestra justificación y la realidad física de nuestra santificación se están alineando. En la glorificación, estamos con Cristo y estamos hechos completamente perfectos (1 Juan 3:2; Colosenses 1:27; Colosenses 3:4). 




08/09/20


“How are we to live our lives in light of Christ’s return?"


Answer: We believe that the return of Jesus Christ is imminent, that is, His return could occur at any moment. We, with the apostle Paul, look for “the blessed hope—the glorious appearing of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ” (Titus 2:13). Knowing that the Lord could come back today, some are tempted to stop what they are doing and just “wait” for Him.


However, there is a big difference between knowing that Jesus could return today and knowing that He will return today. Jesus said, “No one knows about that day or hour” (Matthew 24:36). The time of His coming is something God has not revealed to anyone, and so, until He calls us to Himself, we should continue serving Him. In Jesus’ parable of the ten talents, the departing king instructs his servants to “occupy till I come” (Luke 19:13 KJV).


The return of Christ is always presented in Scripture as a great motivation to action, not as a reason to cease from action. In 1 Corinthians 15:58, Paul wraps up his teaching on the rapture by saying, “Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord.” In 1 Thessalonians 5:6, Paul concludes a lesson on Christ’s coming with these words: “So then, let us not be like others, who are asleep, but let us be alert and self-controlled.” To retreat and “hold the fort” was never Jesus’ intention for us. Instead, we work while we can. “Night is coming, when no one can work” (John 9:4).


The apostles lived and served with the idea that Jesus could return within their lifetime; what if they had ceased from their labors and just “waited”? They would have been in disobedience to Christ’s command to “go into all the world and preach the good news to all creation” (Mark 16:15), and the gospel would not have been spread. The apostles understood that Jesus’ imminent return meant they must busy themselves with God’s work. They lived life to the fullest, as if every day were their last. We, too, should view every day as a gift and use it to glorify God.




“¿Cómo debemos vivir nuestras vidas a la luz del regreso de Cristo?"


Creemos que el regreso de Cristo es inminente, es decir, Su regreso puede ocurrir en cualquier momento. Nosotros, con el apóstol Pablo, buscamos “la esperanza bienaventurada y la manifestación gloriosa de nuestro gran Dios y Salvador Jesucristo” (Tito 2:13). Sabiendo que el Señor puede regresar hoy, algunos son tentados a dejar lo que estén haciendo y sólo “esperar” Por Él. 


Sin embargo, hay una gran diferencia entre saber que Jesús podría regresar hoy y saber que Él regresará hoy. Jesús dijo, “Nadie sabe el día ni la hora” (Mateo 24:36). El tiempo de Su venida es algo que Dios no ha revelado a nadie, y así, hasta que Él nos llame a Sí mismo, debemos continuar sirviéndole. En la parábola de Jesús de los diez talentos, el rey que estaba por ausentarse, instruye a sus siervos: “Negociad, entre tanto que vengo” (Lucas 19:13). 


El regreso de Cristo siempre se presenta en la Escritura como una gran motivación para actuar, no como una razón para dejar de hacerlo. En 1 Corintios 15, Pablo resume su enseñanza sobre el arrebatamiento diciendo, “Así que… estad firmes y constantes, creciendo en la obra del Señor siempre, sabiendo que vuestro trabajo en el Señor no es en vano” (Verso 58). En 1 Tesalonicenses 5, Pablo concluye una lección sobre la venida de Cristo con estas palabras; “Por tanto, no durmamos como los demás, sino velemos y seamos sobrios” (Verso 6). Retroceder y “cuidar el puesto” nunca fue la intención de Jesús para nosotros. En vez de eso, trabajemos mientras podamos. “…la noche viene, cuando nadie puede trabajar” (Juan 9:4). 


Los apóstoles vivieron y sirvieron con la idea de que Jesús podría regresar durante el término de sus vidas; ¿qué hubiera sucedido si hubieran dejado de trabajar y sólo hubieran “esperado”? Hubieran estado en desobediencia a la Gran Comisión de “ir por todo el mundo y predicad el evangelio a toda criatura” (Marcos 16:15), y el evangelio nunca habría sido esparcido. Los apóstoles entendieron que el regreso inminente de Jesús significaba que ellos debían ocuparse de la obra de Dios. Ellos vivieron la vida al máximo, como si cada día fuera el último. Nosotros, como ellos, debemos ver cada día como un regalo y usarlo para glorificar a Dios. 



08/08/20


Question: "What is the Tribulation? How do we know the Tribulation will last seven years?"


Answer: The tribulation is a future seven-year period of time when God will finish His discipline of Israel and finalize His judgment of the unbelieving world. The church, made up of all who have trusted in the person and work of the Lord Jesus to save them from being punished for sin, will not be present during the tribulation. The church will be removed from the earth in an event known as the rapture (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; 1 Corinthians 15:51-53). The church is saved from the wrath to come (1 Thessalonians 5:9). Throughout Scripture, the tribulation is referred to by other names such as the Day of the Lord (Isaiah 2:12; 13:6-9; Joel 1:15; 2:1-31; 3:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:2); trouble or tribulation (Deuteronomy 4:30; Zephaniah 1:1); the great tribulation, which refers to the more intense second half of the seven-year period (Matthew 24:21); time or day of trouble (Daniel 12:1; Zephaniah 1:15); time of Jacob's trouble (Jeremiah 30:7).


An understanding of Daniel 9:24-27 is necessary in order to understand the purpose and time of the tribulation. This passage speaks of 70 weeks that have been declared against "your people." Daniel's people are the Jews, the nation of Israel, and Daniel 9:24 speaks of a period of time that God has given "to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the most holy." God declares that "seventy sevens" will fulfill all these things. This is 70 sevens of years, or 490 years. (Some translations refer to 70 weeks of years.) This is confirmed by another part of this passage in Daniel. In verses 25 and 26, Daniel is told that the Messiah will be cut off after "seven sevens and sixty-two sevens" (69 total), beginning with the decree to rebuild Jerusalem. In other words, 69 sevens of years (483 years) after the decree to rebuild Jerusalem, the Messiah will be cut off. Biblical historians confirm that 483 years passed from the time of the decree to rebuild Jerusalem to the time when Jesus was crucified. Most Christian scholars, regardless of their view of eschatology (future things/events), have the above understanding of Daniel's 70 sevens.


With 483 years having passed from the decree to rebuild Jerusalem to the cutting off of the Messiah, this leaves one seven-year period to be fulfilled in terms of Daniel 9:24: "to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the most holy." This final seven-year period is known as the tribulation period"it is a time when God finishes judging Israel for its sin.


Daniel 9:27 gives a few highlights of the seven-year tribulation period: "He will confirm a covenant with many for one 'seven.' In the middle of the 'seven' he will put an end to sacrifice and offering. And on a wing of the temple he will set up an abomination that causes desolation, until the end that is decreed is poured out on him." The person of whom this verse speaks is the person Jesus calls the "abomination that causes desolation" (Matthew 24:15) and is called "the beast" in Revelation 13. Daniel 9:27 says that the beast will make a covenant for seven years, but in the middle of this week (3 1/2 years into the tribulation), he will break the covenant, putting a stop to sacrifice. Revelation 13 explains that the beast will place an image of himself in the temple and require the world to worship him. Revelation 13:5 says that this will go on for 42 months, which is 3 1/2 years. Since Daniel 9:27 says that this will happen in the middle of the week, and Revelation 13:5 says that the beast will do this for a period of 42 months, it is easy to see that the total length of time is 84 months or seven years. Also see Daniel 7:25, where the "time, times, and half a time" (time=1 year; times=2 years; half a time=1/2 year; total of 3 1/2 years) also refers to "great tribulation," the last half of the seven-year tribulation period when the beast will be in power.


For further references about the tribulation, see Revelation 11:2-3, which speaks of 1260 days and 42 months, and Daniel 12:11-12, which speaks of 1290 days and 1335 days. These days have a reference to the midpoint of the tribulation. The additional days in Daniel 12 may include the time at the end for the judgment of the nations (Matthew 25:31-46) and time for the setting up of Christ's millennial kingdom (Revelation 20:4-6).

In summary, the Tribulation is the 7-year time period in the end times in which humanity's decadence and depravity will reach its fullness, with God judging accordingly.



“¿Qué es la Tribulación? ¿Cómo sabemos que la Tribulación durará siete años?"


La tribulación es un período de tiempo futuro de 7 años, cuando Dios terminará con Su disciplina a Israel y ejecutará Su juicio sobre el mundo incrédulo. La iglesia, formada por todos los que han confiado en la Persona y la obra del Señor Jesús para salvarse de ser castigados por el pecado, no estarán presentes durante la tribulación. La iglesia será sacada de la tierra en un evento conocido como el arrebatamiento (1 Tesalonicenses 4:13-18; 1 Corintios 15:51-53). La iglesia es salvada de la ira venidera (1 Tesalonicenses 5:9). A través de la Escritura, se utilizan otros nombres con referencia a la tribulación, tales como: 


1) El día de Jehová (Isaías 2:12; 13:6,9; Joel 1:15; 2:1-31; 3:14; 1 Tesalonicenses 5:2) 

2) Angustia o tribulación (Deuteronomio 4:30; Sofonías 1:15) 

3) La gran tribulación, que se refiere a la más intensa segunda mitad del período de los 7 años (Mateo 24:21) 

4) Tiempo o día de angustia (Daniel 12:1; Sofonías 1:15) 

5) Tiempo de angustia para Jacob (Jeremías 30:7) 


Es necesaria la comprensión de Daniel 9:24-27 para entender el propósito y tiempo de la tribulación. Este pasaje en Daniel habla de 70 semanas que están determinadas sobre “tu pueblo”. El “pueblo” en este texto son los judíos, la nación de Israel. Daniel 9:24 habla de un período de tiempo que Dios ha determinado para: “terminar la prevaricación, y poner fin al pecado, y expiar la iniquidad, para traer la justicia perdurable y sellar la visión y la profecía, y ungir al Santo de los santos”. Dios declara que “70 semanas” darán cumplimiento a estos hechos. Es importante entender que cuando se habla de “70 semanas” no se está hablando de una semana como la conocemos (7 días). Este período del cual Dios habla, es realmente 70 septenios de años, o sea 490 años. Esto está confirmado por otra porción de este pasaje de Daniel. En los versos 25 y 26, se le dice a Daniel que “se quitará la vida al Mesías” en “7 semanas y 62 semanas” (69 semanas en total) comenzando con el decreto de la reconstrucción de Jerusalén. En otras palabras, el Mesías será quitado 69 septenios de años (483 años) después del decreto de la reconstrucción de Jerusalén. Los historiadores bíblicos confirman que transcurrieron 483 años desde el tiempo en que fue decretada la reconstrucción de Jerusalén, al tiempo que Jesús fue crucificado. La mayoría de los eruditos cristianos, a pesar de sus puntos de vista escatológicos (eventos / cosas futuras), comparten esta opinión sobre las 70 semanas de Daniel. 


Con los 483 años transcurridos desde el decreto para la reconstrucción de Jerusalén a la muerte del Mesías, esto nos deja 1 septenio (7 años) para el cumplimiento de lo descrito en Daniel 9:24 “... para terminar la prevaricación, y poner fin al pecado, y expiar la iniquidad, para traer la justicia perdurable y sellar la visión y la profecía, y ungir al Santo de los santos”. Este período final de los 7 años es conocido como el período de la tribulación, que es el tiempo cuando Dios terminará de juzgar a Israel por su pecado. 


Daniel 9:27 da un poco de luz sobre el período de los 7 años de tribulación. Daniel 9:27 dice, “Y por otra semana confirmará el pacto con muchos; a la mitad de la semana hará cesar el sacrificio y la ofrenda. Después con la muchedumbre de las abominaciones vendrá el desolador, hasta que venga la consumación, y lo que está determinado se derrame sobre el desolador”. La persona de quien se habla en este versículo, es la misma persona a quien Jesús llama “la abominación desoladora” (Mateo 24:15) y en Apocalipsis 13 es llamada “la bestia”. Daniel 9:27 dice que la bestia hará un pacto por una semana (7 años), pero que a la mitad de la semana (3 ½ años dentro de la tribulación), él romperá el pacto, poniendo fin al sacrificio. Apocalipsis 13 explica que la bestia colocará una imagen de él mismo en el templo y demandará que el mundo la adore. Apocalipsis 13:5 dice que esto sucederá por 42 meses, que son 3 ½ años. Puesto que Daniel 9:27 dice que esto sucederá a la mitad de la semana, y Apocalipsis 13:5 dice que la bestia hará esto por un período de 42 meses, es fácil ver que la duración total es de 84 meses o sea 7 años. Ver también Daniel 7:25 donde el “tiempo, y tiempos, y medio tiempo” (tiempo = 1 año; tiempos = 2 años; medio tiempo = ½ año; hacen un total de 3 años ½) también se refiere a la “gran tribulación”, la última mitad de los 7 años del período de la tribulación cuando la “abominación desoladora” (la bestia) estará en el poder. 


Para futuras referencias acerca de la tribulación, ver Apocalipsis 11:2-3 donde se habla de 1,260 días y 42 meses, y Daniel 12:11-12 donde se habla de 1290 días y 1,335 días, todo lo cual hace referencia al punto intermedio de la tribulación. Los días adicionales en Daniel 12 pueden incluir el lapso final para el juicio de las naciones (Mateo 25:31-46) y el tiempo para que Cristo establezca Su Reino Milenial (Apocalipsis 20:4-6). 



08/07/20


“¿What is the difference between the Rapture and the Second Coming?"


The rapture and the second coming of Christ are often confused. Sometimes it is difficult to determine whether a scripture verse is referring to the rapture or the second coming. However, in studying end-times Bible prophecy, it is very important to differentiate between the two.


The rapture is when Jesus Christ returns to remove the church (all believers in Christ) from the earth. The rapture is described in 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:50-54. Believers who have died will have their bodies resurrected and, along with believers who are still living, will meet the Lord in the air. This will all occur in a moment, in a twinkling of an eye. The second coming is when Jesus returns to defeat the Antichrist, destroy evil, and establish His millennial kingdom. The second coming is described in Revelation 19:11-16.


The important differences between the rapture and second coming are as follows:


1) At the rapture, believers meet the Lord in the air (1 Thessalonians 4:17). At the second coming, believers return with the Lord to the earth (Revelation 19:14).


2) The second coming occurs after the great and terrible tribulation (Revelation chapters 6–19). The rapture occurs before the tribulation (1 Thessalonians 5:9Revelation 3:10).


3) The rapture is the removal of believers from the earth as an act of deliverance (1 Thessalonians 4:13-175:9). The second coming includes the removal of unbelievers as an act of judgment (Matthew 24:40-41).


4) The rapture will be secret and instant (1 Corinthians 15:50-54). The second coming will be visible to all (Revelation 1:7Matthew 24:29-30).


5) The second coming of Christ will not occur until after certain other end-times events take place (2 Thessalonians 2:4Matthew 24:15-30; Revelation chapters 6–18). The rapture is imminent; it could take place at any moment (Titus 2:131 Thessalonians 4:13-181 Corinthians 15:50-54).


Why is it important to keep the rapture and the second coming distinct?


1) If the rapture and the second coming are the same event, believers will have to go through the tribulation (1 Thessalonians 5:9Revelation 3:10).


2) If the rapture and the second coming are the same event, the return of Christ is not imminent—there are many things which must occur before He can return (Matthew 24:4-30).


3) In describing the tribulation period, Revelation chapters 6–19 nowhere mentions the church. During the tribulation—also called “the time of trouble for Jacob” (Jeremiah 30:7)—God will again turn His primary attention to Israel (Romans 11:17-31).


The rapture and second coming are similar but separate events. Both involve Jesus returning. Both are end-times events. However, it is crucially important to recognize the differences. In summary, the rapture is the return of Christ in the clouds to remove all believers from the earth before the time of God’s wrath. The second coming is the return of Christ to the earth to bring the tribulation to an end and to defeat the Antichrist and his evil world empire.



“¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida?"


El Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida de Cristo con frecuencia son confundidos. A veces es difícil determinar si un versículo de las Escrituras se está refiriendo al Arrebatamiento o a la Segunda Venida de Jesucristo. Sin embargo, al estudiar la profecía bíblica sobre los últimos tiempos, es muy importante diferenciar entre estas dos. 


El Arrebatamiento es cuando Jesucristo regrese para llevarse a Su iglesia (todos los creyentes en Cristo) de la tierra. El Arrebatamiento se describe en 1 Tesalonicenses 4:13-18 y 1 Corintios 15:50-54. Los creyentes que hayan muerto tendrán sus cuerpos resucitados, y junto con los creyentes que aún vivan, se encontrarán con el Señor en el aire. Esto ocurrirá en un momento, en un abrir y cerrar de ojos. La Segunda Venida es cuando Jesucristo regrese para vencer al anticristo, destruir el mal, y establecer Su Reino Milenial. La Segunda Venida se describe en Apocalipsis 19:11-16. 


Las diferencias importantes entre el Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida son las siguientes: 


(1) En el Arrebatamiento, los creyentes se encontrarán con el Señor en el aire (1 Tesalonicenses 4:17). En la Segunda Venida, los creyentes regresarán con el Señor a la tierra (Apocalipsis 19:14). 


(2) La Segunda Venida ocurre después de la grande y terrible Tribulación (Apocalipsis capítulos 6-19). El Arrebatamiento ocurre antes de la Tribulación (1 Tesalonicenses 5:9; Apocalipsis 3:10). 


(3) El Arrebatamiento es el traslado de los creyentes de la tierra, como un acto de liberación (1 Tesalonicenses 4:13-17; 5:9). La Segunda Venida incluye el quitar a los incrédulos como un acto de juicio (Mateo 24:40-41). 


(4) El Arrebatamiento será “secreto” e instantáneo (1 Corintios 15:50-54). La Segunda Venida será visible para todos (Apocalipsis 1:7; Mateo 24:29-30). 


(5) La Segunda Venida de Cristo no ocurrirá hasta después de que ciertos otros eventos del fin de los tiempos tengan lugar (2 Tesalonicenses 2:4; Mateo 24:15-30; Apocalipsis capítulos 6-18). El Arrebatamiento es inminente y puede suceder en cualquier momento (Tito 2:13; 1 Tesalonicenses 4:13-18; 1 Corintios 15:50-54). 


¿Por qué es importante observar la diferencia entre el Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida de Cristo? 


(1) Si el Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida fueran un mismo evento, los creyentes tendrían que pasar por la Tribulación (1 Tesalonicenses 5:9; Apocalipsis 3:10). 


(2) Si el Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida fueran un mismo evento, el regreso de Cristo no es inminente…. Hay muchas cosas que deben ocurrir antes que Él pueda regresar a la tierra (Mateo 24:4-30). 


(3) Al describir el período de la Tribulación, los capítulos 6-19 del Apocalipsis en ninguna parte mencionan a la iglesia. Durante la Tribulación – también llamada “el tiempo de angustia para Jacob” (Jeremías 30:7) – Dios dirigirá nuevamente Su principal atención sobre Israel (Romanos 11:17-31). 


El Arrebatamiento y la Segunda Venida de Jesucristo son eventos similares pero separados. Los dos implican el regreso de Jesús. Ambos son eventos del fin de los tiempos. Sin embargo, es de crucial importancia reconocer las diferencias. En resumen, el Arrebatamiento es el regreso de Cristo en las nubes para trasladar a todos los creyentes de la tierra antes del tiempo de la ira de Dios. La Segunda Venida es el regreso de Cristo a la tierra, para poner fin a la Tribulación y para vencer al anticristo y su malvado imperio mundial. 




08/06/20


"To whom are we to pray, the Father, the Son, or the Holy Spirit?"


All prayer should be directed to our triune God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The Bible allows for prayer to one or all three, because all three are one. To the Father we pray with the psalmist, “Listen to my cry for help, my King and my God, for to you I pray” (Psalm 5:2). To the Lord Jesus, we pray as to the Father because they are equal. Prayer to one member of the Trinity is prayer to all. Stephen, as he was being martyred, prayed, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit” (Acts 7:59). We are also to pray in the name of Christ. Paul exhorted the Ephesian believers to always give “thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:20). Jesus assured His disciples that whatever they asked in His name—meaning in His will—would be granted (John 15:16; 16:23).


We are told to pray in the Spirit and in His power. The Spirit helps us to pray, even when we do not know how or what to ask for (Romans 8:26; Jude 20). Perhaps the best way to understand the role of the Trinity in prayer is that we pray to the Father, through (or in the name of) the Son, by the power of the Holy Spirit. All three are active participants in the believer’s prayer. 


Equally important is whom we are not to pray to. Some non-Christian religions encourage their adherents to pray to a pantheon of gods, dead relatives, saints, and spirits. Roman Catholics are taught to pray to Mary and various saints. Such prayers are not scriptural and are, in fact, an insult to our heavenly Father. To understand why, we need only look at the nature of prayer. Prayer has several elements, and if we look at just two of them—praise and thanksgiving—we can see that prayer is, at its very core, worship. When we praise God, we are worshiping Him for His attributes and His work in our lives. When we offer prayers of thanksgiving, we are worshiping His goodness, mercy, and loving-kindness to us. Worship gives glory to God, the only One who deserves to be glorified. The problem with praying to anyone other than God is that He will not share His glory. In fact, praying to anyone or anything other than God is idolatry. “I am the LORD; that is my name! I will not give my glory to another or my praise to idols” (Isaiah 42:8).


Other elements of prayer such as repentance, confession, and petition are also forms of worship. We repent knowing that God is a forgiving and loving God and He has provided a means of forgiveness in the sacrifice of His Son on the cross. We confess our sins because we know “He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9) and we worship Him for it. We come to Him with our petitions and intercessions because we know He loves us and hears us, and we worship Him for His mercy and kindness in being willing to hear and answer. When we consider all this, it is easy to see that praying to someone other than our triune God is unthinkable because prayer is a form of worship, and worship is reserved for God and God alone. Whom are we to pray to? The answer is God. Praying to God, and God alone, is far more important than to which Person of the Trinity we address our prayers.



“¿A Quién debemos orar; al Padre, al Hijo, o al Espíritu Santo?"

Toda oración debe ser dirigida a nuestro trino Dios––Padre, Hijo y Espíritu Santo. La Biblia enseña que podemos orarle a uno o a los tres, porque los tres son Uno. Oramos al Padre con el salmista, “Está atento a la voz de mi clamor, Rey mío y Dios mío, porque a Ti oraré” (Salmos 5:2). Al Señor Jesucristo, oramos como al Padre, porque ellos son iguales. El orar a un miembro de la Trinidad, es orarle a todos. Esteban, mientras era martirizado, oraba, “Señor Jesús, recibe mi espíritu” (Hechos 7:59). También oramos en el nombre de Cristo. Pablo exhortaba a los creyentes efesios a darle “…gracias por todo al Dios y Padre, en el nombre de nuestro Señor Jesucristo” (Efesios 5:20). Jesús les aseguró a Sus discípulos que cualquier cosa que pidieran en Su nombre –significando en Su voluntad– les sería concedida (Juan 15:16; 16:23). De manera similar, se nos dice que oremos al Espíritu Santo y en Su poder. El Espíritu nos ayuda a orar, cuando no sabemos cómo o qué pedir (Romanos 8:26; Judas 1:20). Tal vez la mejor manera de entender el papel de la Trinidad en la oración, es que oramos al Padre, a través del Hijo, por el poder del Espíritu Santo. Los Tres son Participantes activos en la oración del creyente. 


Igualmente importante es saber a quién no debemos orar. Algunas religiones no cristianas animan a sus miembros a orar a un panteón de dioses, familiares muertos, santos, y espíritus. Los católicos romanos son enseñados a rezar a María y a varios santos.. Tales oraciones no son bíblicas, y son de hecho, un insulto a nuestro Padre celestial. Para entender el por qué, sólo tenemos que ver la naturaleza de la oración. La oración tiene varios elementos, y si miramos sólo a dos de ellos –alabanza y acción de gracias–, podemos decir que esa oración es, en su esencia misma, adoración. Cuando alabamos a Dios, estamos adorándolo por Sus atributos y Su obra en nuestras vidas. Cuando ofrecemos oraciones de acción de gracias, estamos adorando Su bondad, misericordia, y amoroso cuidado de nosotros. La adoración da gloria a Dios, el Único que merece ser glorificado. El problema con la oración a cualquier otro que no sea Dios, es que Él es un Dios celoso y ha declarado que Él no compartirá Su gloria con nadie. De hecho, el hacerlo resulta ser nada menos que idolatría. “Yo Jehová; este es mi nombre; y a otro no daré mi gloria, ni mi alabanza a esculturas” (Isaías 42:8). 


Otros elementos que están en la oración tales como el arrepentimiento, confesión y petición, también son formas de adoración. Nos arrepentimos sabiendo que Dios es un Dios amoroso y perdonador, que Él ha provisto un medio de perdón en el sacrificio de Su Hijo en la cruz. Confesamos nuestros pecados, porque sabemos que “Él es fiel y justo para perdonar nuestros pecados, y limpiarnos de toda maldad” (1 Juan 1:9) y lo adoramos por ello. Venimos a Él con nuestras peticiones e intercesiones, porque sabemos que Él nos ama y nos escucha, y lo adoramos por Su misericordia y bondad al estar dispuesto a escuchar y responder. Cuando consideramos todo esto, es fácil ver que el orar a alguien más que no sea al Dios trino, es impensable, porque la oración es una forma de adoración, y la adoración es reservada para Dios y Dios solamente. ¿A quién debemos orar? La respuesta es Dios. Orar a Dios, y sólo a Dios, es mucho más importante que a qué Persona de la Trinidad dirigimos nuestras oraciones. 





08/05/20


Question: "How can I have my prayers answered by God?"


Answer: Many people believe answered prayer is God granting a prayer request that is offered to Him. If a prayer request is not granted, it is understood as an "unanswered" prayer. However, this is an incorrect understanding of prayer. God answers every prayer that is lifted to Him. Sometimes God answers "no" or "wait." God only promises to grant our prayers when we ask according to His will. "This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. And if we know that he hears us"whatever we ask"we know that we have what we asked of him" (1 John 5:14-15).


What does it mean to pray according to God's will? Praying according to God's will is praying for things that honor and glorify God and/or praying for what the Bible clearly reveals God's will to be. If we pray for something that is not honoring to God or not God's will for our lives, God will not give what we ask for. How can we know what God's will is? God promises to give us wisdom when we ask for it. James 1:5 proclaims, "If any of you lacks wisdom, he should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him." A good place to start is 1 Thessalonians 5:12-24, which outlines many things that are God's will for us. The better we understand God's Word, the better we will know what to pray for (John 15:7). The better we know what to pray for, the more often God will answer "yes" to our requests.



“¿Cómo puedo hacer que Dios responda a mis oraciones?"

Mucha gente cree que una “oración es contestada” cuando Dios accede a una petición de oración ofrecida a Él. Si la petición de oración no es concedida, con frecuencia se entiende como una oración “no contestada”. Sin embargo, esto es una comprensión incorrecta de la oración. Dios responde a cada oración que es elevada hacia Él. Lo que debemos recordar es que algunas veces Dios responde “no” o “espera”. Dios sólo promete concedernos nuestras oraciones cuando le pedimos de acuerdo a Su voluntad. 1 Juan 5:14-15 nos dice; “Y esta es la confianza que tenemos en Él, que si pedimos alguna cosa conforme a Su voluntad, Él nos oye. Y si sabemos que Él nos oye en cualquiera cosa que pidamos, sabemos que tenemos las peticiones que le hayamos hecho”. 


¿Qué significa pedir de acuerdo a Su voluntad? Orar de acuerdo a la voluntad de Dios es orar por cosas que traerán honra y gloria a Dios y/u orar por cosas que la Biblia revela claramente que es la voluntad de Dios. Si oramos por algo que no es para honrar a Dios, o que no es la voluntad de Dios para nuestras vidas, Dios no nos dará lo que le pedimos. ¿Cómo sabemos cuál es la voluntad de Dios? Dios promete que nos dará sabiduría cuando se la pidamos. Santiago 1:5 dice; “Y si alguno de vosotros tiene falta de sabiduría, pídala a Dios, el cual da a todos abundantemente y sin reproche, y le será dada”. Un buen lugar para empezar es 1 Tesalonicenses 5:12-24, que describe muchas cosas que son la voluntad de Dios para con nosotros. Entre más entendamos la Palabra de Dios, mejor sabremos por lo que debemos orar (Juan 15:7). Entre más sepamos por lo que debemos orar, más a menudo Dios responderá “si” a nuestras peticiones. 






08/04/20


“How can we recognize the voice of God?"


This question has been asked by countless people throughout the ages. Samuel heard the voice of God, but did not recognize it until he was instructed by Eli (1 Samuel 3:1–10). Gideon had a physical revelation from God, and he still doubted what he had heard to the point of asking for a sign, not once, but three times (Judges 6:17–22,36–40). When we are listening for God’s voice, how can we know that He is the one speaking? First of all, we have something that Gideon and Samuel did not. We have the complete Bible, the inspired Word of God, to read, study, and meditate on. “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:16–17). When we have a question about a certain topic or decision in our lives, we should see what the Bible has to say about it. God will never lead us contrary to what He has taught in His Word (Titus 1:2).


To hear God's voice we must belong to God. Jesus said, “My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me” (John 10:27). Those who hear God’s voice are those who belong to Him—those who have been saved by His grace through faith in the Lord Jesus. These are the sheep who hear and recognize His voice, because they know Him as their Shepherd. If we are to recognize God’s voice, we must belong to Him.


We hear His voice when we spend time in Bible study and quiet contemplation of His Word. The more time we spend intimately with God and His Word, the easier it is to recognize His voice and His leading in our lives. Employees at a bank are trained to recognize counterfeits by studying genuine money so closely that it is easy to spot a fake. We should be so familiar with God’s Word that when someone speaks error to us, it is clear that it is not of God.


While God could speak audibly to people today, He speaks primarily through His written Word. Sometimes God’s leading can come through the Holy Spirit, through our consciences, through circumstances, and through the exhortations of other people. By comparing what we hear to the truth of Scripture, we can learn to recognize God’s voice.



“¿Cómo podemos reconocer la voz de Dios?"

Esta pregunta ha sido hecha por muchísima gente a través de todos los tiempos. Samuel escuchó la voz de Dios, pero no la reconoció hasta que fue instruido por Elí (1 Samuel 3:1-10). Gedeón tuvo una revelación física de Dios y aún así dudaba de lo que había escuchado, hasta el punto de pedir una señal, no una vez, sino tres veces (Jueces 6: 17-22 y 36-40). Cuando escuchamos la voz de Dios, ¿cómo sabemos que es Él quien habla? Primero que nada, nosotros tenemos algo que ni Gedeón ni Samuel tenían. Tenemos la Biblia completa, la inspirada Palabra de Dios para leerla, estudiarla y meditarla. “Toda la Escritura es inspirada por Dios, y útil para enseñar, para redargüir, para corregir, para instruir en justicia, a fin de que el hombre de Dios sea perfecto, enteramente preparado para toda buena obra” (2 Timoteo 3:16-17). ¿Tienes una pregunta acerca de algún tema o decisión en tu vida? Ve lo que dice la Biblia acerca de ello. Dios jamás te guiará o dirigirá contrariamente a lo que Él ha pensado o prometido en Su Palabra (Tito 1:2). 


Para escuchar la voz de Dios, debemos pertenecer a Dios. Jesús dijo, “Mis ovejas oyen mi voz, y Yo las conozco, y me siguen” (Juan 10:27). Aquellos que escuchan la voz de Dios son aquellos que le pertenecen, aquellos que han sido salvos por Su gracia a través de la fe en el Señor Jesús. Estas son las ovejas que oyen y reconocen Su voz, porque le conocen como su Pastor. Si queremos reconocer la voz de Dios, debemos pertenecerle a Él. 


Escuchamos Su voz cuando pasamos un tiempo de calidad diariamente en oración, estudio de la Biblia, y quieta contemplación de Su Palabra. Mientras más tiempo pases en intimidad con Dios y Su Palabra, te será más fácil reconocer Su voz y Su guía en tu vida. Los empleados en el banco están entrenados para reconocer falsificaciones mediante el minucioso estudio de los billetes genuinos, así es fácil reconocer los falsos. Debemos estar tan familiarizados con la Palabra de Dios, que cuando alguien nos hable una mentira, podamos tener claridad que no es de Dios. 


Mientras que Dios puede y habla audiblemente a la gente hoy en día, Él habla primeramente a través de Su Palabra; pero a veces también a través del Espíritu Santo a nuestras conciencias, a través de circunstancias, y a través de la exhortación de otras personas. Al comparar lo que escuchamos a la verdad de las Escrituras, podemos aprender a reconocer Su voz. 




08/03/20


When, why, and how does the Lord God discipline us when we sin? -


“When, why, and how does the Lord God discipline us when we sin?"


Answer: The Lord's discipline is an often-ignored fact of life for believers. We often complain about our circumstances without realizing that they are the consequences of our own sin and are a part of the Lord's loving and gracious discipline for that sin. This self-centered ignorance can contribute to the formation of habitual sin in a believer's life, incurring even greater discipline.


Discipline is not to be confused with cold-hearted punishment. The Lord's discipline is a response of His love for us and His desire for each of us to be holy. "My son, do not despise the LORD’s discipline and do not resent his rebuke, because the LORD disciplines those He loves, as a father the son he delights in" 


Proverbs 3:11-12; 11 My son, do not despise the LORD's discipline or be weary of his reproof, 

12 for the LORD reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights. 


See

Hebrews 12:5-11


God will use testing, trials, and various predicaments to bring us back to Himself in repentance. The result of His discipline is a stronger faith and a renewed relationship with God 


James 1:2-4

2 Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds,

3 for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness.

4 And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.


not to mention destroying the hold that particular sin had over us.


The Lord's discipline works for our own good, that He might be glorified with our lives. He wants us to exhibit lives of holiness, lives that reflect the new nature that God has given us: "As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: "Be holy, because I am holy"" (1 Peter 1:15-16).


15 but as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct,

16 since it is written, "You shall be holy, for I am holy." - 1 Peter 1:15-16



"¿Cuándo, por qué, y cómo nos disciplina Dios, cuando pecamos?"

La disciplina del Señor es un hecho con frecuencia ignorado en la vida de los creyentes. Frecuentemente lamentamos nuestras circunstancias sin darnos cuenta de que éstas son las consecuencias de nuestro propio pecado, y que son parte de la gracia y amorosa disciplina del Señor por ese pecado. Esta ignorancia ego-centrista puede contribuir a la formación de hábitos pecaminosos en la vida del creyente, incurriendo entonces en la necesidad de una disciplina aún mayor. 


La disciplina no debe confundirse con un castigo emanado de la dureza del corazón. La disciplina del Señor es una respuesta de Su amor por nosotros, y Su deseo de que cada uno de nosotros sea santo. “No menosprecies, hijo mío, el castigo de Jehová, ni te fatigues de Su corrección; porque Jehová al que ama castiga, como el padre al hijo a quien quiere” 


Proverbios 3:11-12;

11 No menosprecies, hijo mío, el castigo de Jehová, Ni te fatigues de su corrección; 12 Porque Jehová al que ama castiga, Como el padre al hijo a quien quiere.


ver también Hebreos 12:5-11. 


Dios usará pruebas, sufrimientos, y varios predicamentos para traernos arrepentidos, de regreso a Él. El resultado de esta disciplina es una fe reforzada, y una relación con Dios renovada (Santiago 1:2-4), sin mencionar la destrucción del poder que ese pecado en particular tenía sobre nosotros. 


La disciplina del Señor obra para nuestro propio bien, para que Él pueda ser glorificado en nuestras vidas. Él quiere que exhibamos vidas de santidad, vidas que reflejen la nueva naturaleza que Dios nos ha dado: “…como hijos obedientes, no os conforméis a los deseos que antes teníais estando en vuestra ignorancia; sino, como Aquel que os llamó es santo, sed también vosotros santos en toda vuestra manera de vivir; porque escrito está: Sed santos, porque Yo soy santo” (1 Pedro 1:14-16). 


1 Pedro 1:14-16

14 como hijos obedientes, no os conforméis a los deseos que antes teníais estando en vuestra ignorancia;

15 sino, como aquel que os llamó es santo, sed también vosotros santos en toda vuestra manera de vivir;

16 porque escrito está: Sed santos, porque Yo soy santo.





08/02/20


Is there really an afterlife?


Mankind has always been concerned with—and developed numerous theories about—the afterlife. Something within us rebels against the idea that existence ends with the grave. Funerals and memorial services always address the afterlife, complete with euphemisms to describe what happens after life on earth is over. The dead are said to have 'gone on' or 'passed over' or some such phrase. What they have gone on to is often alluded to, and always in positive terms, but frequently not explained in authoritative terms. We all like to think we are headed for something pleasant and positive after we die, but many of us just aren't sure what it is. 


The afterlife is the ultimate mystery, that "undiscovered country from who bourn no traveller returns," as Shakespeare put it. But one traveller has returned from the undiscovered country, one who has gone through to the other side and come back to tell us what to expect. He alone possesses the authority and knowledge to tell everyone the truth about the afterlife. Not only that, but He alone holds the key to unlock the door to the afterlife we all seek—heaven. That person is Jesus Christ who died, was buried, came back to life, and was seen by hundreds of reliable witnesses (1 Corinthians 15:3-8).


Jesus is the sole authority and witness who is able to answer the question, "Is there really an afterlife?" And Christ, whose truthfulness and integrity are unquestioned even by those who deny His deity, makes three basic statements about the subject of life after death. There is an afterlife, there are only two alternatives as to where we spend the afterlife, and there is a way to ensure a positive experience after death. 


First, Christ taught that there is an afterlife in a number of biblical passages, including an encounter with the Sadducees who denied the teaching of resurrection. He reminded them that their own Scriptures affirm that God is not the God of the dead, but of the living (Mark 12:24-27). Jesus clearly told them that those who have died centuries before are very much alive with God at that moment, although they do not marry, becoming instead as the angels. Later, Jesus comforts His disciples (and us) with the hope of being with Him in Heaven: "Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also. And you know the way to where I am going" (John 14:1-4). 


Having established the existence of an afterlife, Jesus also speaks authoritatively about the two destinies awaiting every person that dies: one with God and one without God. In the story of the rich man and Lazarus Jesus describes these two destinations. "The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham's side. The rich man also died and was buried, and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side" (Luke 16:22–23). One aspect of the story worth noting is that there is no intermediate state for those who die; they go directly to their eternal destiny. As the writer of Hebrews says, "it is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgment" (Hebrews 9:27).


Jesus stated the matter simply when He said, "these [unbelievers] will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life" (Matthew 25:46). Clearly there are two destinations for man after death. One is in the Father's house with Christ, the other in a place of torment, a place of "outer darkness" where there is "weeping and gnashing of teeth" (Matthew 8:1222:1325:30). There is no mistaking Jesus' words and meaning. 


Now that we have established the existence of an afterlife and the inevitability of going to one place or the other, what determines our eternal destination? Jesus is equally clear on that subject. The destination for all men is determined by whether they have faith in God and what they do with respect to Christ. Jesus had much to say on this subject, with perhaps the most succinct and to the point statement found in John 3:14-18: "And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God." 


For those who repent of sin and put their faith in Christ as their Savior from sin and Lord of their lives, the afterlife will consist of an eternity spent with God. But for those who reject Him as the only means of salvation (John 14:6), hell and outer darkness away from God's presence is their destiny. There is no middle ground, no intermediate state, no testing ground, and no second chance. As life on this earth ends, life in one place or the other begins and it is so for every human being. The apostle Paul rejoiced in this fact, saying "When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: 'Death is swallowed up in victory.' 'O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?'" (1 Corinthians 15:54–55). For those who spend eternity in heaven with God, death has no hold. It is merely the entrance to an eternity of bliss in the presence of Christ, the One who opened heaven's door for us.



¿Hay realmente vida después de la muerte?


La humanidad siempre se ha preocupado -y ha desarrollado numerosas teorías sobre- el más allá. Algo dentro de nosotros se rebela contra la idea de que la existencia termina con la tumba. Los funerales y los servicios conmemorativos siempre se dirigen a la vida después de la muerte, y se completan con eufemismos para describir lo que sucede después de que termina la vida en la tierra. Se dice que los muertos 'partieron' o 'fallecieron' o alguna frase similar. A lo que se han referido a menudo se alude, y siempre en términos positivos, pero con frecuencia no se explica en términos autoritativos. A todos nos gusta pensar que nos dirigimos a algo agradable y positivo después de morir, pero muchos de nosotros simplemente no estamos seguros de qué se trata. 


La vida después de la muerte es el misterio supremo, ese "país por descubrir de cuyo destino el viajero no regresa", como lo expresó Shakespeare. Pero un viajero ha regresado del país no descubierto, uno que ha pasado al otro lado y vuelve para decirnos qué esperar. Solo él posee la autoridad y el conocimiento para decirles a todos la verdad sobre la vida futura. No solo eso, sino que solo Él tiene la llave para abrir la puerta a la otra vida que todos buscamos: el cielo. Esa persona es Jesucristo quien murió, fue sepultado, volvió a la vida y fue visto por cientos de testigos confiables (1 Corintios 15:3-8). 


Jesús es la única autoridad y testigo que puede responder la pregunta: "¿Existe realmente vida después de la muerte?" Y Cristo, cuya veracidad e integridad no son cuestionadas ni siquiera por aquellos que niegan su deidad, hace tres afirmaciones básicas sobre el tema de la vida después de la muerte. Hay vida después de la muerte, solo hay dos alternativas en cuanto a dónde pasamos la otra vida, y hay una manera de asegurar una experiencia positiva después de la muerte. 


Primero, Cristo enseñó que hay vida después de la muerte en varios pasajes bíblicos, incluido un encuentro con los saduceos que negaron la enseñanza de la resurrección. Les recordó que sus propias Escrituras afirman que Dios no es el Dios de los muertos, sino de los vivos (Marcos 12:24-27). Jesús claramente les dijo que aquellos que han muerto siglos antes están muy vivos con Dios en ese momento, aunque no se casan, llegando a ser en cambio como los ángeles. Más tarde, Jesús consuela a sus discípulos (y a nosotros) con la esperanza de estar con Él en el Cielo: "No se turbe vuestro corazón; creéis en Dios, creed también en mí. En la casa de mi Padre muchas moradas hay; si así no fuera, yo os lo hubiera dicho; voy, pues, a preparar lugar para vosotros. Y si me fuere y os preparare lugar, vendré otra vez, y os tomaré a mí mismo, para que donde yo estoy, vosotros también estéis. Y sabéis a dónde voy, y sabéis el camino." (Juan 14:1-4). 


Habiendo establecido la existencia de una vida después de la muerte, Jesús también habla con autoridad sobre los dos destinos que aguardan a cada persona que muere: una con Dios y otra sin Dios. En la parábola del hombre rico y Lázaro Jesús describe estos dos destinos. "El hombre pobre murió y fue llevado por los ángeles al lado de Abraham. El hombre rico también murió y fue sepultado, y en el Hades, estando en tormento, alzó sus ojos y vio a Abraham lejos y a Lázaro a su lado" (Lucas 16:22-23). Un aspecto de la historia que vale la pena señalar es que no hay un estado intermedio para los que mueren; van directamente a su destino eterno. Como dice el escritor de Hebreos, "está establecido que el hombre muera una sola vez, y después viene el juicio" (Hebreos 9:27). 


Jesús declaró el asunto simplemente cuando dijo: "estos [incrédulos] se irán al castigo eterno, pero los justos a la vida eterna" (Mateo 25:46). Claramente hay dos destinos para el hombre después de la muerte. Uno está en la casa del Padre con Cristo, el otro en un lugar de tormento, un lugar de "las tinieblas de fuera" donde hay "llanto y crujir de dientes" (Mateo 8:12, 22:13, 25:30). No hay duda de las palabras y el significado de Jesús. 


Ahora que hemos establecido la existencia de una vida futura y la inevitabilidad de ir a un lugar u otro, ¿qué determina nuestro destino eterno? Jesús es igualmente claro en ese tema. El destino para todos los hombres está determinado por si tienen fe en Dios y lo que hacen con respecto a Cristo. Jesús tenía mucho que decir sobre este tema, quizás con la afirmación más sucinta y precisa que se encuentra en Juan 3:14-18: "Y como Moisés levantó la serpiente en el desierto, así es necesario que el Hijo del Hombre sea levantado, para que todo aquel que en él cree, no se pierda, más tenga vida eterna Porque de tal manera amó Dios al mundo, que ha dado a su Hijo unigénito, para que todo aquel que en él cree, no se pierda, más tenga vida eterna. Porque no envió Dios a su Hijo al mundo para condenar al mundo, sino para que el mundo sea salvo por él. El que en él cree, no es condenado; pero el que no cree, ya ha sido condenado, porque no ha creído en el nombre del unigénito Hijo de Dios”. 


Para aquellos que se arrepienten del pecado y ponen su fe en Cristo como su Salvador y Señor de sus vidas, la otra vida consistirá en una eternidad con Dios. Pero para aquellos que lo rechazan como el único medio de salvación (Juan 14:6), el infierno y la oscuridad exterior lejos de la presencia de Dios es su destino. No hay un terreno intermedio, no hay un estado intermedio, no hay terreno de prueba, y no hay una segunda oportunidad. A medida que la vida en esta tierra termina, comienza la vida en un lugar u otro y así es para cada ser humano. El apóstol Pablo se regocijó en este hecho, diciendo: "Y cuando esto corruptible se haya vestido de incorrupción, y esto mortal se haya vestido de inmortalidad, entonces se cumplirá la palabra que está escrita: Sorbida es la muerte en victoria. ¿Dónde está, oh muerte, tu aguijón? ¿Dónde, oh sepulcro, tu victoria?" (1 Corintios 15:54-55). Para aquellos que pasan la eternidad en el cielo con Dios, la muerte no tiene cabida. Es simplemente la entrada a una eternidad de bienaventuranza en la presencia de Cristo, el que abrió la puerta del cielo para nosotros. 




08/01/20


Is the concept of purgatory biblical?


The Catholic tradition of purgatory teaches that, upon death, many souls enter a spiritual realm between heaven and hell during which their sins are dealt with until they are prepared to enter heaven. It is a place where sin is "purged" before a person can enter heaven. Furthermore, Catholic tradition encourages the living to do works on behalf of the dead in order to improve the situation of those in purgatory. But what does the Bible say about purgatory?


The Catholic tradition of purgatory teaches that, upon death, many souls enter a spiritual realm between heaven and hell during which their sins are dealt with until they are prepared to enter heaven. It is a place where sin is "purged" before a person can enter heaven. Furthermore, Catholic tradition encourages the living to do works on behalf of the dead in order to improve the situation of those in purgatory. But what does the Bible say about purgatory?


First, it must be clearly noted that the Bible does not teach purgatory. Catholic theologians typically refer to a book in the Apocrypha to support their belief in purgatory. In the Apocrypha, the book of 2 Maccabees states,


"Making a gathering . . . sent twelve thousand drachmas of silver to Jerusalem for sacrifice to be offered for the sins of the dead, thinking well and religiously concerning the resurrection (For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead). And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins" (2 Maccabees 12:43-46).


From this, Catholic doctrine teaches that prayers for the dead were offered before the time of Jesus to improve the condition of the soul. While it may be true that some people offered prayers for the dead, the fact remains that the source is a book not included in the Protestant Bible. Neither Jesus nor the apostles ever spoke of the Apocrypha as Scripture or mentioned purgatory.


Belief in purgatory arose within the church at least as early as the fourth century, with some accepting and others rejecting the concept. However, the Council of Trent in in 1563 mentioned the doctrine of purgatory as already being universally accepted within the church. While it may or may not have been universally accepted, it is clear that purgatory was commonly discussed and accepted by many at this time.


A look at the New Testament reveals a very different perspective regarding the afterlife. First, Jesus spoke very clearly of only two choices in the afterlife in Luke 16:19-31. There we find that a certain rich man had died as an unbeliever and was "in torment" (Luke 16:23). Jesus made it clear that the afterlife offers two options, and that both heaven and hell are eternal.


Matthew 7:13-14 also notes, "Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few." Again, only two options are provided. There is no third option.


The end of the Bible also makes clear God's plan for the end of time. Revelation 20:12-15 says,


"And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened. Then another book was opened, which is the book of life. And the dead were judged by what was written in the books, according to what they had done. And the sea gave up the dead who were in it, Death and Hades gave up the dead who were in them, and they were judged, each one of them, according to what they had done. Then Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death, the lake of fire. And if anyone's name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire."


Once again, only two choices exist—heaven or hell (here called the lake of fire). Purgatory is an extra-biblical teaching developed beyond what Jesus and the apostles presented in the Bible. As such, it lacks biblical authority and is to be rejected. While the idea of a "middle ground" may find historical support in other places or seem sensible to many, the fact is that it is not supported by the Bible—the very book that forms the basis for Christian belief. Believers are not called to offer prayers or works on behalf of the dead. The dead's eternity has already been decided. Instead, we must seek to grow in Christ and share Him with others.



¿Es bíblico el concepto del purgatorio?


La tradición católica del purgatorio enseña que, tras la muerte, muchas almas entran en un reino espiritual entre el cielo y el infierno durante el cual se expían sus pecados hasta que están preparados para entrar en el cielo. Es un lugar donde el pecado es "purgado" antes de que una persona pueda entrar al cielo. Además, la tradición católica alienta a los vivos a hacer obras en nombre de los muertos para mejorar la situación de aquellos en el purgatorio. Pero, ¿qué dice la Biblia sobre el purgatorio? 


Primero, debe notarse claramente que la Biblia no enseña nada sobre el purgatorio. Los teólogos católicos generalmente se refieren a un libro en los apócrifos para apoyar su creencia en el purgatorio. En los Apócrifos, el libro de 2 Macabeos dice: 


"Después de haber reunido entre sus hombres cerca de 2.000 dracmas, las mandó a Jerusalén para ofrecer un sacrificio por el pecado, obrando muy hermosa y noblemente, pensando en la resurrección. Pues de no esperar que los soldados caídos resucitarían, habría sido superfluo y necio rogar por los muertos; mas si consideraba que una magnífica recompensa está reservada a los que duermen piadosamente, era un pensamiento santo y piadoso. Por eso mandó hacer este sacrificio expiatorio en favor de los muertos, para que quedaran liberados del pecado." (II Macabeos 12:43-46 - Biblia Católica de Jerusalén Online). A partir de esto, la doctrina católica enseña que las oraciones por los muertos se ofrecían antes del tiempo de Jesús para mejorar la condición del alma. Si bien puede ser cierto que algunas personas ofrecieron oraciones por los muertos, el hecho es que la fuente es un libro no incluido en la Biblia protestante. Ni Jesús ni los apóstoles hablaron de los Apócrifos como Escritura o mencionaron el purgatorio. 


La creencia en el purgatorio surgió dentro de la iglesia al menos ya en el siglo IV, y algunos aceptaron y otros rechazaron el concepto. Sin embargo, el Concilio de Trento en 1563 mencionó que la doctrina del purgatorio ya era universalmente aceptada dentro de la iglesia. Si bien puede o no haber sido aceptado universalmente, está claro que el purgatorio fue comúnmente discutido y aceptado por muchos en este momento. 


Una mirada al Nuevo Testamento revela una perspectiva muy diferente con respecto al más allá. Primero, Jesús habló muy claramente de solo dos opciones en la otra vida en Lucas 16: 19-31. Allí encontramos que cierto hombre rico había muerto como incrédulo y estaba "atormentado" (Lucas 16:23). Jesús dejó en claro que la otra vida ofrece dos opciones, y que tanto el cielo como el infierno son eternos. 


Mateo 7: 13-14 también señala: "Entren por la puerta estrecha. Porque es ancha la puerta y espacioso el camino que conduce a la destrucción, y muchos entran por ella. Pero estrecha es la puerta y angosto el camino que conduce a la vida, y son pocos los que la encuentran." Nuevamente, solo se proporcionan dos opciones. No hay una tercera opción. 


El final de la Biblia también deja en claro el plan de Dios para el fin de los tiempos. Apocalipsis 20: 12-15 dice: 


"Vi también a los muertos, grandes y pequeños, de pie delante del trono. Se abrieron unos libros, y luego otro, que es el libro de la vida. Los muertos fueron juzgados según lo que habían hecho, conforme a lo que estaba escrito en los libros. El mar devolvió sus muertos; la muerte y el infierno[a] devolvieron los suyos; y cada uno fue juzgado según lo que había hecho. La muerte y el infierno fueron arrojados al lago de fuego. Este lago de fuego es la muerte segunda. Aquel cuyo nombre no estaba escrito en el libro de la vida era arrojado al lago de fuego." 


Una vez más, solo existen dos opciones: el cielo o el infierno (aquí llamado el lago de fuego). El purgatorio es una enseñanza extrabíblica desarrollada más allá de lo que Jesús y los apóstoles presentaron en la Biblia. Como tal, carece de autoridad bíblica y debe ser rechazado. Si bien la idea de un "punto intermedio" puede encontrar apoyo histórico en otros lugares o parecer razonable para muchos, el hecho es que no está respaldada por la Biblia, el libro que es el fundamento para la creencia cristiana. Los creyentes no están llamados a ofrecer oraciones u obras en nombre de los muertos. La eternidad de los muertos ya ha sido decidida. En cambio, debemos buscar crecer en Cristo y compartirlo con los demás. 




07/31/20

"What signs indicate that the end times are approaching?"


Matthew 24:5–8 gives us some important clues for discerning the approach of the end times: “Many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am the Christ,’ and will deceive many. You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come. 


Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are the beginning of birth pains.” An increase in false messiahs, an increase in warfare, and increases in famines, plagues, and natural disasters—these are signs of the end times. In this passage, though, we are given a warning: we are not to be deceived, because these events are only the beginning of birth pains; the end is still to come.


Some interpreters point to every earthquake, every political upheaval, and every attack on Israel as a sure sign that the end times are rapidly approaching. While the events may signal the approach of the last days, they are not necessarily indicators that the end times have arrived. The apostle Paul warned that the last days would bring a marked increase in false teaching. 


“The Spirit clearly says that in later times some will abandon the faith and follow deceiving spirits and things taught by demons” (1 Timothy 4:1). The last days are described as “perilous times” because of the increasingly evil character of man and people who actively “oppose the truth” (2 Timothy 3:1–9; see also 2 Thessalonians 2:3).


Other possible signs would include a rebuilding of a Jewish temple in Jerusalem, increased hostility toward Israel, and advances toward a one-world government. The most prominent sign of the end times, however, is the nation of Israel. In 1948, Israel was recognized as a sovereign state, essentially for the first time since AD 70. 


God promised Abraham that his posterity would have Canaan as “an everlasting possession” (Genesis 17:8), and Ezekiel prophesied a physical and spiritual resuscitation of Israel (Ezekiel 37). Having Israel as a nation in its own land is important in light of end-times prophecy because of Israel’s prominence in eschatology (Daniel 10:14; 11:41; Revelation 11:8).


With these signs in mind, we can be wise and discerning in regard to the expectation of the end times. We should not, however, interpret any of these singular events as a clear indication of the soon arrival of the end times. God has given us enough information that we can be prepared, and that is what we are called to be as our hearts cry out, “Come, Lord Jesus” (Revelation 22:20).





“¿Cuáles son las señales del fin de los tiempos?"



Mateo 24:5-8 nos da importantes pistas para que podamos discernir la aproximación del fin de los tiempos, “Porque vendrán muchos en mi nombre, diciendo; Yo soy el Cristo; y a muchos engañarán. Y oiréis de guerras y rumores de guerras; mirad que no os turbéis, porque es necesario que todo esto acontezca; pero aún no es el fin. 


Porque se levantará nación contra nación, y reino contra reino; y habrá pestes, y hambres, y terremotos en diferentes lugares. Y todo esto será principio de dolores”. Un incremento en falsos Mesías, un incremento en guerras, un incremento en hambrunas, plagas y desastres naturales – estos acontecimientos son “señales” del fin de los tiempos. 


Aún en este pasaje, estamos siendo advertidos; no debemos dejarnos engañar (Mateo 24:4), porque estos eventos son sólo el principio de los dolores de parto (Mateo 24:8). El fin está aún por venir (Mateo 24:6). 


Muchos intérpretes señalan cada terremoto, cada conmoción política, y cada ataque sobre Israel como una señal segura de que el fin de los tiempos se acerca rápidamente. Mientras que estos eventos son señales de que el fin de los tiempos se aproxima, no son necesariamente indicadores de que el final ha llegado. 


El apóstol Pablo advierte que en los últimos días habrá un marcado incremento de falsas enseñanzas. “Pero el Espíritu dice claramente que en los postreros tiempos algunos apostatarán de la fe, escuchando a espíritus engañadores y a doctrinas de demonios” (1 Timoteo 4:1). Los últimos días son descritos como “tiempos peligrosos” por el incremento en el carácter maligno del hombre y las personas que conscientemente “resistirán la verdad” (2 Timoteo 3:1-9; 4:3-4, ver también 2 Tesalonicenses 2:3). 


Otras posibles señales incluyen la reconstrucción del templo judío en Jerusalén, un incremento en la hostilidad hacia Israel, y avances encaminados a un gobierno mundial. La señal más prominente del fin de los tiempos, sin embargo, es la nación de Israel. En 1948, Israel fue reconocido como un estado soberano por primera vez desde el año 70 d.C. 


Dios prometió a Abraham que su descendencia poseería la tierra de Canaán como “heredad perpetua” (Génesis 17:8), y Ezequiel profetizó una resurrección física y espiritual de Israel (Ezequiel 37). El tener a Israel como nación en su propia tierra, es importante a la luz de la profecía del fin de los tiempos, por la prominencia de Israel dentro de la escatología (Daniel 10:14, 11:41; Apocalipsis 11:8). 


Con estas señales en mente, podemos ser sabios y tener discernimiento con respecto a la expectativa del fin de los tiempos. Sin embargo, no debemos de ninguna manera interpretar ninguno de estos eventos singulares como una clara indicación de la pronta llegada del fin. Dios nos ha dado suficiente información para que podamos estar preparados, y a eso es a lo que estamos llamados. 



07/30/20


"How can I have assurance of my salvation?"


Answer: Many followers of Jesus Christ look for the assurance of salvation in the wrong places. We tend to seek assurance of salvation in the things God is doing in our lives, in our spiritual growth, in the good works and obedience to God’s Word that is evident in our Christian walk. While these things can be evidence of salvation, they are not what we should base the assurance of our salvation on. Rather, we should find the assurance of our salvation in the objective truth of God’s Word. We should have confident trust that we are saved based on the promises God has declared, not because of our subjective experiences.


How can you have assurance of salvation? Consider 1 John 5:11–13: “And this is the testimony: God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life.” Who is it that has the Son? It is those who have believed in Him (John 1:12). If you have Jesus, you have life. Not temporary life, but eternal.


God wants us to have assurance of our salvation. We should not live our Christian lives wondering and worrying each day whether or not we are truly saved. That is why the Bible makes the plan of salvation so clear. Believe in Jesus Christ (John 3:16; Acts 16:31). “If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved” (Romans 10:9). Have you repented? Do you believe that Jesus died to pay the penalty for your sins and rose again from the dead (Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 5:21)? Do you trust Him alone for salvation? If your answer to these questions is “yes,” you are saved! Assurance means freedom from doubt. By taking God’s Word to heart, you can have no doubt about the reality of your eternal salvation.


Jesus Himself assures those who believe in Him: “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand” (John 10:28–29). Eternal life is just that—eternal. There is no one, not even yourself, who can take Christ’s God-given gift of salvation away from you.


Take joy in what God’s Word is saying to you: instead of doubting, we can live with confidence! We can have the assurance from Christ’s own Word that our salvation will never be in question. Our assurance of salvation is based on the perfect and complete salvation God has provided for us through Jesus Christ.



“¿Cómo puedo tener la seguridad de mi Salvación?"


Muchos seguidores de Jesucristo buscan la seguridad de la salvación en los lugares equivocados. Tendemos a buscar la seguridad de la salvación en las cosas que Dios está haciendo en nuestras vidas, en nuestro crecimiento espiritual, en las buenas obras y en la obediencia a la Palabra de Dios que es evidente en nuestro caminar cristiano. Aunque estas cosas pueden ser evidencia de la salvación, no son las cosas en las cuales debemos basar la seguridad de nuestra salvación. Más bien, debemos encontrar la seguridad de nuestra salvación en la verdad objetiva de la Palabra de Dios. Debemos tener confianza en que somos salvos basados en las promesas que Dios ha declarado, no por nuestras experiencias subjetivas. 


¿Cómo puedes estar seguro de ser salvo? Considera 1 Juan 5:11-13 “Y este es el testimonio: que Dios nos ha dado vida eterna; y esta vida está en Su Hijo. El que tiene al Hijo, tiene la vida; el que no tiene al Hijo de Dios no tiene la vida. Estas cosas os he escrito a vosotros que creéis en el nombre del Hijo de Dios, para que sepáis que tenéis vida eterna, y para que creáis en el nombre del Hijo de Dios”. ¿Quién es quien tiene al Hijo? Aquellos que han creído en Él y lo han recibido (Juan 1:12). Si tienes a Jesús, tienes la vida. La vida eterna; no temporal, sino eterna. 


Dios quiere que tengamos la seguridad de nuestra salvación. No podemos vivir nuestra vida cristiana dudando y preocupándonos cada día por saber si realmente somos o no salvos. Esto es por lo que la Biblia hace tan claro el plan de salvación. “... cree en el Señor Jesucristo, y serás salvo...” (Juan 3:16; Hechos 16:31). “Si confesares con tu boca que Jesús es el Señor, y creyeres en tu corazón que Dios le levantó de los muertos, serás salvo” (Romanos 10:9). ¿Te has arrepentido de tus pecados? ¿Crees que Jesús es el Salvador, que Él murió para pagar el castigo por tus pecados y resucitó de entre los muertos? (Romanos 5:8; 2 Corintios 5:21). ¿Estás confiando solamente en Él para tu salvación? Si tu respuesta es sí, ¡entonces eres salvo! La seguridad significa “no tener nada de duda”. Al creer la Palabra de Dios de corazón, puedes estar completamente seguro acerca de la realidad de tu eterna salvación. 


Jesús mismo declara esto acerca de aquellos que creen en Él: “Y yo les doy vida eterna; y no perecerán jamás, ni nadie las arrebatará de mi mano. Mi Padre que me las dio, es mayor que todos, y nadie las puede arrebatar de la mano de mi Padre”. (Juan 10:28-29). La vida eterna es justo eso – eterna. No hay nadie, ni siquiera tú mismo, que pueda quitarte este regalo de Dios en Cristo, que es la salvación. 


Gózate en lo que la Palabra de Dios te dice: Al hacer eso en lugar de dudar, ¡podemos vivir con confianza! Podemos tener la seguridad de la propia Palabra de Cristo, de que nuestra salvación nunca estará en duda. Nuestra seguridad de salvación se basa en la salvación perfecta y completa que Dios nos ha dado a través de Jesucristo. 



07/29/20 


“What is unrepentance? What does it mean to be unrepentant?"


An unrepentant person knows that he or she has sinned and refuses to ask God for forgiveness or turn away from the sin. The unrepentant show no remorse for their wrongdoing and don’t feel the need to change. Unrepentance is the sin of willfully remaining sinful.


Repentance is a change of mind that results in a change of action. Repentance leads to life (Acts 11:18), and it is a necessary part of salvation. God commands everyone to repent and have faith in Christ (Acts 2:38; 17:30; 20:21). Unrepentance is therefore a serious sin with dire consequences. The unrepentant live in a state of disobedience to God, unheeding of His gracious call. The unrepentant remain unsaved until they turn from their sin and embrace Christ’s sacrifice on the cross.


King Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, wrote, “Whoever remains stiff-necked after many rebukes will suddenly be destroyed—without remedy” (Proverbs 29:1). To be stiff-necked is to have a stubborn, obstinate spirit that makes one unresponsive to God’s guidance or correction. The stiff-necked are, by definition, unrepentant.


The apostle Paul warned of the consequences of unrepentance: “Because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God’s wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed. God ‘will repay each person according to what they have done.’ To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger. There will be trouble and distress for every human being who does evil” (Romans 2:5–9; cf. Psalm 62:12). There is a judgment coming. The results of righteousness will be beautiful, but the consequences of unrepentance will be harsh.


The book of Revelation shows how inured to sin the sinner can be. During the tribulation, after three different judgments of God, the wicked will remain unrepentant, despite their great suffering (Revelation 9:20–21; 16:8–11). The tragedy is that, even as some people are experiencing the horrendous consequences of their sin, they will continue in their state of unrepentance.


Is there such a thing as an unrepentant Christian? Biblically, to become a Christian, one must repent and believe; a believer in Christ is one who has repented of sin. What, then, of professed believers who live in unrepentant sin? Most likely, they are not saved; they are mere professors, with no work of the Holy Spirit in their hearts. The apostle John states it bluntly: “If we claim to have fellowship with him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not live out the truth” (1 John 1:6). The other possibility is that people claiming to be saved yet living in unrepentant sin are saved but acting in disobedience—in which case their unrepentance is a temporary hardness of heart, and God’s discipline will eventually restore them to fellowship (see 1 Corinthians 5:1–5).


The unrepentant sinner needs to hear the good news of God’s salvation. God’s goodness leads people to repentance (Romans 2:4), and He is a God of forbearance and longsuffering. Christians should confess their own sins, pray for the unrepentant, and evangelize the unsaved: “Opponents [of the truth] must be gently instructed, in the hope that God will grant them repentance leading them to a knowledge of the truth, and that they will come to their senses and escape from the trap of the devil, who has taken them captive to do his will” (2 Timothy 2:25–26).




“¿Qué es el arrepentimiento? ¿Qué significa ser impenitente? 


Una persona no arrepentida sabe que él o ella ha pecado y se niega a pedirle perdón a Dios o alejarse del pecado. Los impenitentes no muestran remordimiento por sus malas acciones y no sienten la necesidad de cambiar. La falta de arrepentimiento es el pecado de permanecer deliberadamente pecaminoso. 


El arrepentimiento es un cambio de mentalidad que resulta en un cambio de acción. El arrepentimiento conduce a la vida (Hechos 11:18), y es una parte necesaria de la salvación. Dios ordena a todos arrepentirse y tener fe en Cristo (Hechos 2:38; 17:30; 20:21). La falta de arrepentimiento es, por lo tanto, un pecado grave con graves consecuencias. Los impenitentes viven en un estado de desobediencia a Dios, sin prestar atención a su llamado de gracia. Los no arrepentidos permanecen sin ser salvos hasta que se apartan de su pecado y abrazan el sacrificio de Cristo en la cruz. 






El rey Salomón, el hombre más sabio que jamás haya vivido, escribió: "Quien permanezca con el cuello rígido después de muchas reprimendas será repentinamente destruido, sin remedio" (Proverbios 29: 1). Tener el cuello rígido es tener un espíritu obstinado y obstinado que hace que uno no responda a la guía o corrección de Dios. Los de cuello rígido son, por definición, impenitentes.


El apóstol Pablo advirtió sobre las consecuencias del arrepentimiento: “Debido a tu terquedad y tu corazón arrepentido, estás acumulando ira contra ti mismo para el día de la ira de Dios, cuando su justo juicio será revelado. Dios "le pagará a cada persona de acuerdo con lo que ha hecho". A aquellos que persisten en hacer el bien buscan la gloria, el honor y la inmortalidad, les dará vida eterna. Pero para aquellos que se buscan a sí mismos y que rechazan la verdad y siguen el mal, habrá ira y enojo. Habrá problemas y angustia para cada ser humano que hace el mal ”(Romanos 2: 5–9; cf. Salmo 62: 12). Se acerca un juicio. Los resultados de la justicia serán hermosos, pero las consecuencias de no arrepentirse  serán duras. 


El libro de Apocalipsis muestra cuán acostumbrado al pecado puede ser el pecador. Durante la tribulación, después de tres juicios diferentes de Dios, los malvados permanecerán impenitentes, a pesar de su gran sufrimiento (Apocalipsis 9: 20–21; 16: 8–11). La tragedia es que, aunque algunas personas estén experimentando las horrendas consecuencias de su pecado, continuarán en su estado de arrepentimiento. 


¿Existe un cristiano impenitente? Bíblicamente, para convertirse en cristiano, uno debe arrepentirse y creer; Un creyente en Cristo es uno que se ha arrepentido del pecado. ¿Qué sucede, entonces, con los creyentes profesos que viven en pecado no arrepentido? Lo más probable es que no se guarden; son meros profesores, sin obra del Espíritu Santo en sus corazones. El apóstol Juan lo dice sin rodeos: "Si afirmamos tener comunión con él y, sin embargo, caminar en la oscuridad, mentimos y no vivimos la verdad" (1 Juan 1: 6). La otra posibilidad es que las personas que afirman ser salvas pero que viven en un pecado no arrepentido son salvas pero actúan en desobediencia, en cuyo caso su arrepentimiento es una dureza temporal de corazón, y la disciplina de Dios eventualmente los restaurará a la comunión (ver 1 Corintios 5: 1). –5).


El pecador impenitente necesita escuchar las buenas nuevas de la salvación de Dios. La bondad de Dios lleva a las personas al arrepentimiento (Romanos 2: 4), y Él es un Dios de paciencia y paciencia. Los cristianos deben confesar sus propios pecados, orar por los que no se arrepienten y evangelizar a los no salvos: "Los opositores [de la verdad] deben ser amablemente instruidos, con la esperanza de que Dios les conceda el arrepentimiento que los lleve al conocimiento de la verdad, y que ellos volverá a sus sentidos y escapará de la trampa del demonio, que los ha llevado cautivos para hacer su voluntad ”(2 Timoteo 2: 25–26).



07/28/20


How can I accept Jesus as my personal savior?


Accepting Jesus as your personal Savior involves an understanding of who Jesus is, what a Savior is, and what it means to accept Jesus as Savior.


Jesus Christ is often noted as a good person, yet the Bible declares He is much more. He is God in human form who came to live on earth (John 1:1). He lived, taught, performed miracles, suffered, died, and resurrected from the dead to prove He is Lord. In 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 the apostle Paul shared, "I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures."


A Savior is a rescuer, redeemer, or one who saves someone else. Jesus is Savior of the world in every aspect of this word. Jesus rescues us from sin and eternal punishment when we trust in Him by faith. He is a redeemer because He paid the cost of our sins through His death on the cross. He can save us because He has the power to forgive sins and the desire to save those who trust in Him.


To accept Jesus as your personal Savior is to acknowledge who Jesus is in your own life. It is to believe in Him. John 1:12 says: "But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God." John 3:16 adds, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."



¿Cómo puedo aceptar a Jesús como mi salvador personal?


Aceptar a Jesús como su Salvador personal implica comprender quién es Jesús, qué es un Salvador y lo que significa aceptar a Jesús como Salvador. 


Jesucristo es a menudo conocido como una buena persona, pero la Biblia declara que Él es mucho más. Él es Dios en forma humana que vino a vivir en la tierra (Juan 1: 1). Vivió, enseñó, realizó milagros, sufrió, murió y resucitó de entre los muertos para demostrar que Él es el Señor. En 1 Corintios 15: 3-4, el apóstol Pablo compartió: "Porque ante todo les transmití a ustedes lo que yo mismo recibí: que Cristo murió por nuestros pecados según las Escrituras, que fue sepultado, que resucitó al tercer día según las Escrituras".


Un Salvador es un rescatador, redentor o alguien que salva a alguien más. Jesús es el Salvador del mundo en todos los aspectos de esta palabra. Jesús nos rescata del pecado y del castigo eterno cuando confiamos en Él por fe. Él es un redentor porque pagó el costo de nuestros pecados a través de su muerte en la cruz. Él puede salvarnos porque tiene el poder de perdonar pecados y el deseo de salvar a quienes confían en Él. 


Aceptar a Jesús como su Salvador personal es reconocer quién es Jesús en su propia vida. Es creer en Él. Juan 1:12 dice: "Mas a cuantos lo recibieron, a los que creen en su nombre, les dio el derecho de ser hijos de Dios." Juan 3:16 agrega: "Porque tanto amó Dios al mundo que dio a su Hijo unigénito, para que todo el que cree en él no se pierda, sino que tenga vida eterna." 


¿Estás dispuesto a depositar tu fe en Jesucristo como tu Salvador y recibir este regalo gratuito de vida eterna? Si es así, tome la decisión ahora mismo. No hay una oración especial que deba realizar para hacerlo. Sin embargo, la siguiente oración es una que puede usar para aceptar a Jesucristo como su Salvador: 


"Querido Dios, me doy cuenta de que soy un pecador y que nunca podría alcanzar el cielo por mis buenas obras. En este momento pongo mi fe en Jesucristo como el Hijo de Dios que murió por mis pecados y resucitó de los muertos para darme vida eterna. Por favor perdóname mis pecados y ayúdame a vivir para ti. Gracias por aceptarme y darme la vida eterna ".



07/26/20


What is sin?


Sin is a difficult topic to discuss theologically because the same word in English refers to several different states. In its most basic form, sin is a transgression of law and rebellion against God. Sin is any action that harms the relationship we have with God and/or another person. It is choosing to act in a way that pulls us away from God. He designed us to respond to Him in a way that is in agreement with His nature. Sin breaks that connection, refuses that gift, and rejects God.


Sin entered the world when Adam ate from the tree God had prohibited. We are now spiritually sinful because of the "sin nature" we inherited from Adam. We are born with the nature of sin and a natural tendency to sin. We are born with the inclination to reject God. Because of our identity as descendents of Adam, we also carry "imputed sin." This is a financial or legal term meaning taking something that belongs to someone and crediting it to another's account. It is almost like being a fan of a certain team because they are the only team in town. We are identified with that team, which in our case is sin. Of course, sin is also each individual action which is counter to God's law.


Sin can manifest in many different ways. The Hebrew 'awon means an iniquity or malevolent unfairness (1 Samuel 20:1). Rasha' infers restlessness or something that is out of control (Isaiah 57:21). Chata' is the most commonly heard definition. It means missing the mark or straying off course (Judges 20:16). 'Abar means to transgress or to go beyond that which is sanctioned (Judges 2:20). In the New Testament, the Greek hamartia is similar to the Hebrew chata' but it goes further. It is not only "missing the mark," but also the inner compulsion or nature that induced the offense (Romans 6:1). Similarly, it can be an organized power that deliberately sets about causing a person or group to fall into sin (Romans 6:12).


Since all sin is the rejection of God, His authority, and His preference, sin automatically excludes us from His presence. But forgivness of sin, as well as grace and peace and eternal life in paradise are only found in God. Freedom from the grasp of sin is only found in God. Our inherited sin nature, our imputed sin, and our every little choice definitively separate us from God. Fortunately, Jesus' sacrifice covers all sins. Instead of Adam's imputed sin, we receive Christ's imputed righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:21)—we choose another team to identify with. As the Holy Spirit indwells us, the sin nature loses its grasp, and we are no longer its slave. And when we commit individual acts of sin, we are authorized to approach the throne of grace with confidence (Hebrews 4:16), knowing that coming to God and confessing our sins will allow us to renew our relationship with Him.



¿Qué es el pecado?


El pecado es un tema difícil de discutir teológicamente porque la misma palabra en inglés se refiere a varios estados diferentes. En su forma más básica, el pecado es una transgresión de la ley y una rebelión contra Dios. El pecado es cualquier acción que daña la relación que tenemos con Dios y / o con otra persona. Es elegir actuar de una manera que nos aleje de Dios. Él nos diseñó para responderle de una manera que esté de acuerdo con Su naturaleza. El pecado rompe esa conexión, rechaza ese don y rechaza a Dios. 


El pecado entró al mundo cuando Adán comió del árbol que Dios había prohibido. Ahora somos espiritualmente pecadores debido a la "naturaleza del pecado" que heredamos de Adán. Nacemos con la naturaleza del pecado y una tendencia natural al pecado. Nacemos con la inclinación de rechazar a Dios. Debido a nuestra identidad como descendientes de Adán, también llevamos el "pecado imputado". Este es un término financiero o legal que significa tomar algo que le pertenece a alguien y acreditarlo a la cuenta de otra persona. Es casi como ser un fan de cierto equipo porque es el único equipo en la ciudad. Estamos identificados con ese equipo, que en nuestro caso es pecado. Por supuesto, el pecado es también cada acción individual que es contraria a la ley de Dios. 


El pecado puede manifestarse de muchas maneras diferentes. El hebreo 'awon significa una iniquidad o una injusticia malévola (1 Samuel 20:1). Rasha 'infiere inquietud o algo que está fuera de control (Isaías 57:21). Chata 'es la definición más comúnmente escuchada. Significa perder la marca o desviarse del curso (Jueces 20:16). 'Abar significa transgredir o ir más allá de lo sancionado (Jueces 2:20). En el Nuevo Testamento, el hamartia griego es similar al hebreo chata 'pero va más allá. No solo es "perder la marca", sino también la compulsión interna o la naturaleza que indujo la ofensa (Romanos 6:1). De manera similar, puede ser un poder organizado que deliberadamente se propone causar que una persona o grupo caiga en pecado (Romanos 6:12). 


Como todo pecado es el rechazo de Dios, su autoridad y su preferencia, el pecado automáticamente nos excluye de su presencia. Pero el perdón del pecado, así como la gracia y la paz y la vida eterna en el paraíso, solo se encuentran en Dios. La libertad de la comprensión del pecado solo se encuentra en Dios. Nuestra naturaleza pecaminosa heredada, nuestro pecado imputado y cada una de nuestras pequeñas elecciones nos separan definitivamente de Dios. Afortunadamente, el sacrificio de Jesús cubre todos los pecados. En lugar del pecado imputado de Adán, recibimos la justicia imputada de Cristo (2 Corintios 5:21). Escogemos otro equipo con el que identificarnos. A medida que el Espíritu Santo mora en nosotros, la naturaleza del pecado pierde su comprensión, y ya no somos su esclavo. Y cuando cometemos actos individuales de pecado, estamos autorizados a acercarnos al trono de la gracia con confianza (Hebreos 4:16), sabiendo que venir a Dios y confesar nuestros pecados nos permitirá renovar nuestra relación con él. 




07/25/20


Are we all born sinners?


We are all born sinners. From the moment we enter this world until our final breath, we have a sinful nature. It does not matter whether one is a child or an adult, a "good" person or a "bad" one, all of us are sinners. To sin is to fall short of God's perfect standards or to go against His laws. All humans have a natural tendency to go against the things of God, as is made obvious in something as small as our natural tendency toward selfishness. Due to our sin, we are all separated from God and deserving of His punishment (Romans 3:236:23Ephesians 2:1–5). 


Our sin nature is inherited from Adam (Romans 5:121 Corinthians 15:21–22). When God created Adam and Eve, He made them in His own image and without sin (Genesis 1:26–27). However, they had the ability to make their own decisions and they chose to disobey God (Genesis 3). By disobeying God, they sinned and became sinful in nature. Their children inherited this sinful nature and their children and so forth. All of humanity descends from Adam and Eve; therefore all of humanity inherits a sinful nature or is born as sinners. Romans 5:12 explains, "Therefore, just as sin came into the world through one man, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all sinned." 


Our sin nature is a part of us from birth (Psalm 58:3Proverbs 22:15); we are born sinners. Even before we are conscious of sin it influences our bodies and our actions. King David wrote, "Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me" (Psalm 51:5). Children have a natural inclination to act selfishly and must be taught to share and put others first. In addition, our bodies are already imperfect at birth and easily broken—a result of living in a fallen world due to sin in a general sense. 


Our sin nature is not something we can overcome on our own. Although people can do good things, they are not inherently good in nature. They will never be able to do enough good works to atone for their sin, nor can they stop sinning simply by their own will power. Writing to the church in Ephesus, Paul describes the state of humanity without Christ, "And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience—among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind" (Ephesians 2:1–3). 


But there is hope! Jesus Christ has overcome sin. Jesus was fully human and fully God. It seems that the sin nature is passed down from generation to generation through the father; the virgin birth meant Jesus did not receive a sin nature. Jesus became a perfect man, living a perfect life without sinning. By sacrificing His life on the cross, He atoned for both our sinful nature and our sinful actions. Therefore, "For if, because of one man's trespass, death reigned through that one man, much more will those who receive the abundance of grace and the free gift of righteousness reign in life through the one man Jesus Christ" (Romans 5:17). Just as Adam's sin spread sin throughout the world, Jesus' sacrifice defeated all sin. 


In this life we will always have a sinful nature. However, there are at least three promises for those who choose to commit their lives to Jesus. First, their sin is not counted against them; in Christ we are completely forgiven (1 Corinthians 6:112 Corinthians 5:21). Second, they will be empowered by the Holy Spirit to withstand the temptation to sin and Jesus will work to transform their hearts so that they will become more like Him in nature (1 Corinthians 10:132 Corinthians 5:17Philippians 1:62:12–13). Finally, one day they will be reunited with God in heaven and will be forever free of sin (Revelation 21—22). In Jesus we need no longer be separated from God. We are not bound to our birth as sinners, but can become children of God: "But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God" (John 1:12–13). 



¿Nacemos todos en pecado?


Todos nacemos en pecado. Desde el momento en que entramos en este mundo hasta nuestro aliento final, tenemos una naturaleza pecaminosa. No importa si uno es un niño o un adulto, una persona "buena" o una "mala", todos somos pecadores. Pecar es no cumplir con los estándares perfectos de Dios o ir en contra de sus leyes. Todos los humanos tienen una tendencia natural a ir en contra de las cosas de Dios, como se hace evidente en algo tan pequeño como nuestra tendencia natural hacia el egoísmo. Debido a nuestro pecado, todos estamos separados de Dios y merecemos su castigo (Romanos 3:23; 6:23; Efesios 2: 1–5). 


Nuestra naturaleza de pecado es heredada de Adán (Romanos 5:12; 1 Corintios 15: 21–22). Cuando Dios creó a Adán y Eva, los hizo a su propia imagen y sin pecado (Génesis 1: 26–27). Sin embargo, tenían la capacidad de tomar sus propias decisiones y decidieron desobedecer a Dios (Génesis 3). Al desobedecer a Dios, pecaron y se volvieron pecaminosos por naturaleza. Sus hijos heredaron esta naturaleza pecaminosa, los hijos de sus hijos y así sucesivamente. Toda la humanidad desciende de Adán y Eva, por lo tanto, toda la humanidad hereda una naturaleza pecaminosa o nace como pecadores. Romanos 5:12 explica: "Por medio de un solo hombre el pecado entró en el mundo, y por medio del pecado entró la muerte; fue así como la muerte pasó a toda la humanidad, porque todos pecaron." 


Nuestra naturaleza de pecado es parte de nosotros desde el nacimiento (Salmo 58: 3; Proverbios 22:15); nacemos en pecado. Incluso antes de que seamos conscientes del pecado, influye en nuestros cuerpos y nuestras acciones. El rey David escribió: "Yo sé que soy malo de nacimiento; pecador me concibió mi madre." (Salmo 51: 5). Los niños tienen una inclinación natural a actuar egoístamente y se les debe enseñar a compartir y poner a los demás primero. Además, nuestros cuerpos ya son imperfectos al nacer y vulnerables, como resultado de vivir en un mundo caído debido al pecado. 


Nuestra naturaleza pecaminosa no es algo que podamos vencer por nuestra cuenta. Aunque las personas pueden hacer cosas buenas, no son inherentemente buenas por naturaleza. Nunca podrán hacer suficientes buenas obras para expiar su pecado, ni pueden dejar de pecar simplemente por su propia fuerza de voluntad. Escribiendo a la iglesia en Éfeso, Pablo describe el estado de la humanidad sin Cristo: "En otro tiempo ustedes estaban muertos en sus transgresiones y pecados, en los cuales andaban conforme a los poderes de este mundo. Se conducían según el que gobierna las tinieblas, según el espíritu que ahora ejerce su poder en los que viven en la desobediencia. En ese tiempo también todos nosotros vivíamos como ellos, impulsados por nuestros deseos pecaminosos, siguiendo nuestra propia voluntad y nuestros propósitos. Como los demás, éramos por naturaleza objeto de la ira de Dios." (Efesios 2: 1–3). 


¡Pero hay esperanza! Jesucristo ha vencido el pecado. Jesús era completamente humano y completamente Dios. Al parecer la naturaleza pecaminosa se transmite de generación en generación a través del padre, por lo tanto, el nacimiento virginal significaba que Jesús no recibió una naturaleza pecadora. Jesús se convirtió en un hombre perfecto, viviendo una vida perfecta sin pecar. Al sacrificar su vida en la cruz, expió tanto nuestra naturaleza pecaminosa como nuestras acciones pecaminosas. Por lo tanto, "[…] si por la transgresión de un solo hombre reinó la muerte, con mayor razón los que reciben en abundancia la gracia y el don de la justicia reinarán en vida por medio de un solo hombre, Jesucristo." (Romanos 5:17) Así como el pecado de Adán extendió el pecado por todo el mundo, el sacrificio de Jesús derrotó a todo pecado. 


En esta vida siempre tendremos una naturaleza pecaminosa. Sin embargo, hay al menos tres promesas para aquellos que eligen entregar sus vidas a Jesús. Primero, su pecado no se cuenta en su contra; en Cristo somos completamente perdonados (1 Corintios 6:11; 2 Corintios 5:21). Segundo, serán fortalecidos por el Espíritu Santo para resistir la tentación de pecar y Jesús obrará para transformar sus corazones para que se asemejen más a Él (1 Corintios 10:13, 2 Corintios 5:17; Filipenses 1: 6; 2: 12-13). Finalmente, un día se reencontrarán con Dios en el cielo y estarán para siempre libres de pecado (Apocalipsis 21—22). En Jesús ya no necesitamos estar separados de Dios. No estamos obligados a nuestro nacimiento como pecadores, sino que podemos convertirnos en hijos de Dios: "Mas a cuantos lo recibieron, a los que creen en su nombre, les dio el derecho de ser hijos de Dios. Estos no nacen de la sangre, ni por deseos naturales, ni por voluntad humana, sino que nacen de Dios."(Juan 1: 12-13). 



07/24/20


How does a person love Jesus? What does it mean to love Jesus?


To love Jesus means, first of all, to receive Him (John 1:12–13). Receiving Jesus is not something that comes naturally to anyone (1 Corinthians 2:14). In fact, the Scripture describes humans as born in sin and naturally hostile to God (Psalm 51:5; Colossians 1:21). It is only when we are born again (regenerated) by the Spirit of God that our disposition toward Jesus changes (John 3:3–5). The Holy Spirit overcomes our inborn resistance to God and draws us to Jesus (John 6:44). The Spirit removes our metaphorical heart of stone and replaces it with a heart that loves Jesus (Ezekiel 11:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17–18). The Spirit of God opens our eyes to behold the beauty of Jesus and opens our ears to hear and receive the good news concerning Jesus (Acts 26:18). It is God Himself who makes us spiritually alive and grants us the repentance and faith needed to embrace Jesus as our Lord and Savior (Ephesians 2:4–10; 2 Timothy 2:25). We receive Jesus by believing in Him and trusting that He died for our sins. The first step in loving Jesus is receiving Him as Lord and Savior. 


Jesus said that there is no greater love than to lay down your life for your friends (John 15:13). Jesus did this and more by dying for us while we were still His enemies in order to make us His friends (Romans 5:8). Much of what it means to love Jesus comes from understanding and appreciating what Jesus has done and is doing for us. We love Jesus because He first loved us (1 John 4:19). As we grow in our knowledge of who Jesus is and what He has accomplished for us, our love for Christ will continually increase (2 Peter 3:18; Colossians 1:10). 


To love Jesus means to treasure Him above all things and all people (Luke 14:26; 16:13). The person that loves Jesus values Him more than anything and anyone. The disciple of Jesus must be willing to give up anything and everything, even his or her own life, in service to Him. To live for Jesus must be our greatest purpose, to be in His presence our greatest joy (Philippians 1:21; 2 Corinthians 5:8). 


To love Jesus means to keep His commandments (John 14:15). His commands are not burdensome but light (1 John 5:3). For what He commands He also gives the power to perform. Jesus has sent us the Holy Spirit to teach, remind, lead, comfort, indwell, and empower us to obey His commands (John 14:15–17). By extension, we are commanded to obey the apostles' teachings as they were commissioned by Jesus Himself to teach with His authority. By obeying the commands of Jesus, we demonstrate that we love Him. 


When we fail to keep Jesus' commands, we are to confess our sins and thank God for the forgiveness that we have through Jesus' sacrificial death (1 John 1:9). For Jesus is the propitiation for our sin, as well as our advocate before the Father (1 John 2:1; 4:10). Because Jesus died for our sins and rose from the dead, we will live eternally in His presence, enjoying and praising Him forever (Revelation 21:3, 22–26). This, too, is what it means to love Jesus. 





¿Cómo una persona ama a Jesús?


Amar a Jesús significa, en primer lugar, recibirlo (Juan 1: 12-13). Recibir a Jesús no es algo que le llegue naturalmente a nadie (1 Corintios 2:14). De hecho, la Escritura describe a los humanos como nacidos en pecado y naturalmente hostiles a Dios (Salmo 51: 5; Colosenses 1:21). Es solo cuando nacemos de nuevo (regenerados) por el Espíritu de Dios que nuestra disposición hacia Jesús cambia (Juan 3: 3–5). El Espíritu Santo vence nuestra resistencia innata a Dios y nos atrae a Jesús (Juan 6:44). El Espíritu quita nuestro corazón metafórico de piedra y lo reemplaza con un corazón que ama a Jesús (Ezequiel 11:19; 2 Corintios 5: 17-18). El Espíritu de Dios abre nuestros ojos para contemplar la belleza de Jesús y abre nuestros oídos para escuchar y recibir las buenas nuevas acerca de Jesús (Hechos 26:18). Es Dios mismo quien nos hace espiritualmente vivos y nos otorga el arrepentimiento y la fe necesarios para abrazar a Jesús como nuestro Señor y Salvador (Efesios 2: 4–10; 2 Timoteo 2:25). Recibimos a Jesús creyendo en Él y confiando en que murió por nuestros pecados. El primer paso para amar a Jesús es recibirlo como Señor y Salvador. 


Jesús dijo que no hay mayor amor que dar tu vida por tus amigos (Juan 15:13). Jesús hizo esto y más al morir por nosotros mientras aún éramos sus enemigos para hacernos sus amigos (Romanos 5: 8). Mucho de lo que significa amar a Jesús proviene de comprender y apreciar lo que Jesús ha hecho y está haciendo por nosotros. Amamos a Jesús porque Él nos amó primero (1 Juan 4:19). A medida que crecemos en nuestro conocimiento de quién es Jesús y lo que Él ha logrado por nosotros, nuestro amor por Cristo aumentará continuamente (2 Pedro 3:18; Colosenses 1:10). 


Amar a Jesús significa atesorarlo por encima de todas las cosas y de todas las personas (Lucas 14:26; 16:13). La persona que ama a Jesús lo valora más que a nada ni a nadie. El discípulo de Jesús debe estar dispuesto a renunciar a todo, incluso a su propia vida, al servicio de él. Vivir para Jesús debe ser nuestro mayor propósito, estar en su presencia nuestro mayor gozo (Filipenses 1:21; 2 Corintios 5: 8). 


Amar a Jesús significa guardar Sus mandamientos (Juan 14:15). Sus mandamientos no son gravosos sino ligeros (1 Juan 5: 3). Es Dios mismo quien también nos otorga el poder de obedecer lo que Él ordena. Jesús nos ha enviado el Espíritu Santo para enseñar, recordar, guiar, consolar, morar y capacitarnos para obedecer sus mandamientos (Juan 14: 15-17). Por extensión, se nos ordena obedecer las enseñanzas de los apóstoles, ya que Jesús mismo les encargó que enseñaran con su autoridad. Al obedecer los mandamientos de Jesús, demostramos que lo amamos. 


Cuando no cumplimos con los mandamientos de Jesús, debemos confesar nuestros pecados y agradecer a Dios por el perdón que tenemos a través de la muerte sacrificial de Jesús (1 Juan 1: 9). Porque Jesús es la propiciación por nuestro pecado, así como nuestro abogado ante el Padre (1 Juan 2: 1; 4:10). Debido a que Jesús murió por nuestros pecados y resucitó de entre los muertos, viviremos eternamente en Su presencia, disfrutando y alabándolo para siempre (Apocalipsis 21: 3, 22–26). Esto también es lo que significa amar a Jesús. 




07/21/20

“What is the meaning of Christian redemption?"


Everyone is in need of redemption. Our natural condition was characterized by guilt: "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God" (Romans 3:23). Christ's redemption has freed us from guilt, being "justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus' (Romans 3:24).


The benefits of redemption include eternal life (Revelation 5:9-10), forgiveness of sins (Ephesians 1:7), righteousness (Romans 5:17), freedom from the law's curse (Galatians 3:13), adoption into God's family (Galatians 4:5), deliverance from sin's bondage (Titus 2:14; 1 Peter 1:14-18), peace with God (Colossians 1:18-20), and the indwelling of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19-20). To be redeemed, then, is to be forgiven, holy, justified, free, adopted, and reconciled. See also Psalm 130:7-8; Luke 2:38; and Acts 20:28.


The word redeem means "to buy out." The term was used specifically in reference to the purchase of a slave's freedom. The application of this term to Christ's death on the cross is quite telling. If we are "redeemed," then our prior condition was one of slavery. God has purchased our freedom, and we are no longer in bondage to sin or to the Old Testament law. This metaphorical use of "redemption" is the teaching of Galatians 3:13 and 4:5.


Related to the Christian concept of redemption is the word ransom. Jesus paid the price for our release from sin and its punishment (Matthew 20:28; 1 Timothy 2:6). His death was in exchange for our life. In fact, Scripture is quite clear that redemption is only possible "through His blood," that is, by His death (Colossians 1:14).


The streets of heaven will be filled with former captives who, through no merit of their own, find themselves redeemed, forgiven, and free. Slaves to sin have become saints. No wonder we will sing a new song"a song of praise to the Redeemer who was slain (Revelation 5:9). We were slaves to sin, condemned to eternal separation from God. Jesus paid the price to redeem us, resulting in our freedom from slavery to sin and our rescue from the eternal consequences of that sin.



“¿Qué significa la redención cristiana?"

Todos necesitan de la redención. Nuestra condición natural se caracterizó por la culpa: “Por cuanto todos pecaron, y están destituidos de la gloria de Dios”. La redención de Cristo nos ha librado de la culpa: “siendo justificados gratuitamente por su gracia, mediante la redención que es en Cristo Jesús” (Romanos 3:24). 


Los beneficios de la redención incluyen la vida eterna (Apocalipsis 5:9-10), el perdón de los pecados (Efesios 1:7), la justificación (Romanos 5:17), libertad de la maldición de la ley (Gálatas 3:13), adopción dentro de la familia de Dios (Gálatas 4:5), liberación de la esclavitud del pecado (Tito 2:14; 1 Pedro 1:14-18), paz con Dios (Colosenses 1:18-20), y la morada permanente del Espíritu Santo (1 Corintios 6:19-20). Entonces, ser redimido es ser perdonado, santificado, justificado, bendecido, liberado, adoptado y reconciliado. (Ver también Salmos 130:7-8; Lucas 2:38; y Hechos 20:28). 


La palabra redimir significa “comprar”. El término era usado específicamente con referencia al pago de la libertad de un esclavo. La aplicación de este término a la muerte de Cristo en la cruz, significa exactamente eso. Si somos “redimidos,” entonces nuestra condición previa era la de esclavitud. Dios ha pagado nuestra libertad, y ya no estamos bajo la esclavitud del pecado o de la ley del Antiguo Testamento. Este uso metafórico de la “redención” es la enseñanza de Gálatas 3:13 y 4:5. 


La palabra rescate está relacionada con el concepto cristiano de la redención. Jesús pagó el precio de nuestra liberación del pecado y sus consecuencias (Mateo 20:28; 1 Timoteo 2:6). Su muerte fue ofrecida a cambio de nuestra vida. De hecho, la Escritura dice claramente que la redención sólo es posible “a través de Su sangre”, esto es, por Su muerte (Colosenses 1:14). 


Las calles del cielo estarán llenas de ex-cautivos, quienes, por ningún mérito propio, se encuentran redimidos, perdonados y libres. Los esclavos del pecado son convertidos en santos. No sorprende que cantan un nuevo cántico—un cántico de alabanza al Redentor que fue inmolado (Apocalipsis 5:9). Nosotros éramos esclavos del pecado, condenados a una separación eterna de Dios. Jesús pagó el precio para redimirnos, resultando en nuestra liberación de la esclavitud del pecado, y nuestro rescate de las consecuencias eternas de ese pecado. 




07/20/20


“How can I overcome my fear of the end of days?"


The best way to overcome a fear of the end of days is to be spiritually prepared for it. First and foremost, you must have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ in order to have eternal life (John 3:16; Romans 10:9-10). Only through Him can you receive forgiveness of sin and have eternity with God. If God is your Father, there’s really nothing to worry about (Luke 12:32).


Second, every Christian should live a life worthy of the calling we have in Christ. Ephesians 4:1-3 teaches, “Walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” Knowing Christ and walking in His will go a long way towards diminishing fear of any kind.


Third, Christians are told what will happen in the end, and it’s encouraging. First Thessalonians 4:13-18 notes, 


But we do not want you to be uninformed, brothers, about those who are asleep, that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope. For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep. For this we declare to you by a word from the Lord, that we who are alive, who are left until the coming of the Lord, will not precede those who have fallen asleep. For the Lord himself will descend from heaven with a cry of command, with the voice of an archangel, and with the sound of the trumpet of God. And the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive, who are left, will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so we will always be with the Lord. Therefore encourage one another with these words.


Rather than fear the future, we are called to anticipate the future with joy. Why? In Christ, we will be “caught up” to meet Him and we “will always be with the Lord.”


Further, Scripture says we do not need to fear Judgment Day: “By this is love perfected with us, so that we may have confidence for the day of judgment, because as he is so also are we in this world. There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love” (1 John 4:17-18).


The apostle Peter reveals that, even if our future holds suffering, we need not fear: “But even if you should suffer for righteousness' sake, you will be blessed” (1 Peter 3:14). Peter and many other early believers endured much hardship and even death because of their faith in Christ. Suffering is not to be feared; it is a blessing when it is borne for the name of Jesus.


Those who do not know Christ do not have the promise of peace for the future. For them, there is a real concern because they have not settled the issue of where they will spend eternity. Those who do know Christ do not fear the end of days. Instead, we strive to live a life worthy of our calling, live with confidence, suffer patiently, anticipate Jesus’ return, and rest in the knowledge that our times are in His hands (Psalm 31:15).



“¿Cómo puedo vencer mi temor del fin del mundo?"

Jesús dijo que el fin del mundo incluirá algunos acontecimientos aterradores; a decir verdad, "desfalleciendo los hombres por el temor y la expectación de las cosas que sobrevendrán en la tierra" (Lucas 21:26). Hoy en día, algunas personas están llenas de temor, pensando en lo que sucederá. Sin embargo, el Señor no quiere que tengamos temor: "No temáis, manada pequeña, porque a vuestro Padre le ha placido daros el reino" (Lucas 12:32).


La mejor forma de vencer el temor del fin del mundo, es estar espiritualmente preparado. En primer lugar, hay que tener una relación personal con Jesucristo para tener vida eterna (Juan 3:16; Romanos 10:9-10). Sólo a través de Él se puede recibir el perdón por los pecados y tener eternidad con Dios. Si Dios es su Padre y Jesús es su Señor, no hay nada de qué preocuparse (Filipenses 4:7).


En segundo lugar, cada cristiano debe vivir una vida digna del llamado que tenemos en Cristo Jesús. Efesios 4:1¬–3 enseña, “andéis como es digno de la vocación con que fuisteis llamados, con toda humildad y mansedumbre, soportándoos con paciencia los unos a los otros en amor, solícitos en guardar la unidad del Espíritu en el vínculo de la paz”. Conocer a Cristo y caminar en Su voluntad, ayudará en gran medida a menguar cualquier temor 


Tercero, a los cristianos se les promete la liberación de parte de Dios, y esto es alentador. 1 Tesalonicenses 4:13-18, señala,


Tampoco queremos, hermanos, que ignoréis acerca de los que duermen, para que no os entristezcáis como los otros que no tienen esperanza. Porque si creemos que Jesús murió y resucitó, así también traerá Dios con Jesús a los que durmieron en él. Por lo cual os decimos esto en palabra del Señor: que nosotros que vivimos, que habremos quedado hasta la venida del Señor, no precederemos a los que durmieron. Porque el Señor mismo con voz de mando, con voz de arcángel, y con trompeta de Dios, descenderá del cielo; y los muertos en Cristo resucitarán primero. Luego nosotros los que vivimos, los que hayamos quedado, seremos arrebatados juntamente con ellos en las nubes para recibir al Señor en el aire, y así estaremos siempre con el Señor. Por tanto, alentaos los unos a los otros con estas palabras.


En vez de temer por el futuro, vamos a esperarlo con gozo. Aquellos que están en Cristo serán "arrebatados" para reunirse con Él, y "estarán con el Señor por siempre".


Además, la Biblia dice que no debemos temer el día del juicio final: “En esto se ha perfeccionado el amor en nosotros, para que tengamos confianza en el día del juicio; pues como él es, así somos nosotros en este mundo. En el amor no hay temor, sino que el perfecto amor echa fuera el temor; porque el temor lleva en sí castigo. De donde el que teme, no ha sido perfeccionado en el amor” (1 Juan 4:17–18).


Aquellos que no conocen a Cristo, no tienen la promesa de paz para el futuro. Para los incrédulos, existe una genuina preocupación porque no han solucionado el tema de dónde van a pasar la eternidad. Los incrédulos no serán llevados en el rapto y experimentarán la Tribulación; sin duda, ellos tienen temor de algo. Los creyentes no le temen al fin del mundo. Por el contrario, se esfuerzan por vivir una vida digna del llamado, esperando la segunda venida de Jesús, y descansan en el conocimiento que nuestros tiempos están en Sus manos (Salmo 31:15). 




07/19/20 



Does the Bible teach eternal security?


Eternal security is the Christian teaching that a person who comes to genuine faith in Jesus Christ can never lose his or her salvation. Is this what the Bible teaches?


Several New Testament passages provide information to help answer this question. 


In John 6:37-40 Jesus teaches, "All that the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out. For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me. And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day. For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day."


Here Jesus makes several specific promises regarding those who follow Him. He teaches He will never cast them out, will lose nothing of all that God the Father has given Him, and will raise up every person who has believed in Him on the last day. Jesus very clearly stated that every person who genuinely comes to faith in Him will be with Him for eternity.


Jesus also teaches in John 10:27-29, "My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father's hand." Here we find Jesus promising to give His followers eternal life and declaring that no one will be able to take them from His hand.


Romans 8 is an entire chapter devoted to the theme of verse 1: "There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus." Many aspects of eternal security are then mentioned throughout the chapter, concluding with Romans 8:38-39, which promise, "For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord." There is no power that can separate a believer in Jesus from Him.


While some argue that there are other biblical passages referring to a believer losing his or her faith in Jesus, the consistent message of in the Bible about the issue is that a person who has truly believed in Jesus as Lord cannot lose his or her salvation. There are other explanations for such troublesome passages. 



¿Enseña la Biblia la seguridad eterna?


La seguridad eterna es la enseñanza cristiana de que una persona que llega a una fe genuina en Jesucristo nunca puede perder su salvación. ¿Es esto lo que la Biblia enseña? 


Varios pasajes del Nuevo Testamento proporcionan información para ayudar a responder esta pregunta. 


En Juan 6: 37-40, Jesús enseña: "Todos los que el Padre me da vendrán a mí; y al que a mí viene, no lo rechazo. Porque he bajado del cielo no para hacer mi voluntad, sino la del que me envió. Y esta es la voluntad del que me envió: que yo no pierda nada de lo que él me ha dado, sino que lo resucite en el día final. Porque la voluntad de mi Padre es que todo el que reconozca al Hijo y crea en él tenga vida eterna, y yo lo resucitaré en el día final." 


Aquí Jesús hace varias promesas específicas con respecto a aquellos que lo siguen. Él enseña que nunca los echará, no perderá nada de todo lo que Dios el Padre le ha dado, y levantará a toda persona que haya creído en Él en el último día. Jesús dijo muy claramente que toda persona que genuinamente tenga fe en Él estará con Él por la eternidad. 


Jesús también enseña en Juan 10: 27-29: "Mis ovejas oyen mi voz; yo las conozco y ellas me siguen. Yo les doy vida eterna, y nunca perecerán, ni nadie podrá arrebatármelas de la mano. Mi Padre, que me las ha dado, es más grande que todos; y de la mano del Padre nadie las puede arrebatar." Aquí encontramos a Jesús prometiendo dar a sus seguidores vida eterna y declarando que nadie podrá quitárselos de su mano. 


Romanos 8 es un capítulo completo dedicado al tema del versículo 1: "Por lo tanto, ya no hay ninguna condenación para los que están unidos a Cristo Jesús". Muchos aspectos de la seguridad eterna se mencionan a lo largo del capítulo, concluyendo con Romanos 8: 38-39, que promete: "Pues estoy convencido de que ni la muerte ni la vida, ni los ángeles ni los demonios, ni lo presente ni lo por venir, ni los poderes, ni lo alto ni lo profundo, ni cosa alguna en toda la creación podrá apartarnos del amor que Dios nos ha manifestado en Cristo Jesús nuestro Señor." No hay poder que pueda separar a un creyente en Jesús de Él. 


Mientras que algunos sostienen que hay otros pasajes bíblicos que se refieren a un creyente que pierde su fe en Jesús, el mensaje consistente de la Biblia sobre el tema es que una persona que realmente ha creído en Jesús como Señor no puede perder su salvación. Hay otras explicaciones para pasajes tan problemáticos. 




07/18/20  


How does the Holy Spirit seal us? What is the seal of the Holy Spirit?


(Rejoice and do not doubt your salvation, with this you give honor and glory to God. He gave his only begotten Son to save you. God has known from eternity past.  This is a humiliating thought, which provokes joy and desire to love God).


In biblical times, a seal was a guarantee. Ephesians 1:13-14 shares regarding the Holy Spirit, "In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of it, to the praise of his glory." According to this passage, the seal of the Holy Spirit takes place at the point of salvation. It is a promise or guarantee of the Christian's future, eternal inheritance with Jesus Christ.


The Greek word translated as "seal" is shragizo that means "to set a seal upon, mark with a seal." A seal could be used to guarantee a document or letter (Esther 3:12), indicate ownership (Song of Songs 8:6), or protect against tampering (Matthew 27:66Revelation 5:1). The Holy Spirit is our seal in every sense of this word.


First, the Holy Spirit in the believer's life helps to guarantee he or she is a child of God. Romans 8:16 shares, "The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God."


Second, the seal of the Holy Spirit serves as a mark that we truly belong to Christ. Romans 8:9-10 teaches, "You, however, are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him. But if Christ is in you, although the body is dead because of sin, the Spirit is life because of righteousness." First Corinthians 6:19-20 also notes, "Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body."


Third, the seal of the Holy Spirit helps protect against tampering or attack. Romans 8:13declares, "For if you live according to the flesh you will die, but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live." In a very real sense, God's Spirit protects us and guarantees our eternity with the Lord.


At what point does the sealing of the Holy Spirit take place? It takes place when a person believes the gospel (Ephesians 1:13John 7:37-39). At that point, God's seal offers the promise of eternal life (John 3:16) because of salvation based on God's grace through faith in Jesus Christ (Ephesians 2:8-9).


The seal of the Holy Spirit offers a wonderful glimpse of God's role in salvation. When we receive salvation in Christ, we are given a guarantee, exchange our ownership for His, and are protected against forces of evil. This seal should provide wonderful encouragement for the believer against the spiritual battles in this life (Ephesians 6:12) and anticipation for the life to come.



¿Cómo nos sella el Espíritu Santo?


(Regocíjate y no dudes de tu salvación, con esto le das honra y gloria a Dios.  El entregó a su Hijo Unigénito para salvarte.  El té conoce desde la eternidad pasada.  Este es un pensamiento humillante, que provoca gozo y deseo de amar a Dios). 


En la época de la Biblia, un sello era una garantía. Efesios 1:13-14 comparte sobre el Espíritu Santo, “En él también ustedes, cuando oyeron el mensaje de la verdad, el evangelio que les trajo la salvación, y lo creyeron, fueron marcados con el sello que es el Espíritu Santo prometido. Éste garantiza nuestra herencia hasta que llegue la redención final del pueblo adquirido por Dios, para alabanza de su gloria.”. Según este pasaje, el sello del Espíritu Santo sucede en el momento de la salvación. Es una promesa o garantía del futuro del Cristiano, herencia eterna con Jesucristo. 


En primer lugar, el Espíritu Santo en la vida del creyente ayuda a garantizar que el o ella es un hijo de Dios. Romanos 8:16 comparte, “El Espíritu mismo le asegura a nuestro espíritu que somos hijos de Dios.”.


En segundo lugar, el sello del Espíritu Santo sirve como una maraca de que de veras pertenecemos a Cristo. Romanos 8:9-10 enseña, “Sin embargo, ustedes no viven según la naturaleza pecaminosa sino según el Espíritu, si es que el Espíritu de Dios vive en ustedes. Y si alguno no tiene el Espíritu de Cristo, no es de Cristo. Pero si Cristo está en ustedes, el cuerpo está muerto a causa del pecado, pero el Espíritu que está en ustedes es vida a causa de la justicia.”. 1 Corintios 6:19-20 también dice, “¿Acaso no saben que su cuerpo es templo del Espíritu Santo, quien está en ustedes y al que han recibido de parte de Dios? Ustedes no son sus propios dueños; fueron comprados por un precio. Por tanto, honren con su cuerpo a Dios.”.


En tercer lugar, el sello del Espíritu Santo ayuda a proteger contra ataques o manipulaciones. Romanos 8:13 declara, “Porque si ustedes viven conforme a ella, morirán; pero si por medio del Espíritu dan muerte a los malos hábitos del cuerpo, vivirán.”. En un sentido muy verdadero, el Espíritu de Dios nos protege y nos garantiza la eternidad con nuestro Señor. 


¿A qué punto ocurre el acto de ser sellado del Espíritu Santo? Sucede cuando uno cree en el evangelio (Efesios 1:13; Juan 7:37-39). En aquel instante, el sello de Dios ofrece la promesa de vida eterna (Juan 3:16) porque la salvación está basada sobre la gracia de Dios mediante la fe en Jesucristo (Efesios 2:8-9).


El sello del Espíritu Santo ofrece un vistazo maravilloso del papel de Dios en la salvación. Cuando recibimos la salvación en Cristo, nos dan una garantía, cambiamos nuestra posesión por la Suya, y somos protegidos contra las fuerzas de la maldad. Este sello debería dar apoyo maravilloso al creyente contra sus batallas espirituales en su vida (Efesios 6:12) y anticipación para la vida que sigue.




07/17/20  


“Is it possible for a person's name to be erased from the Book of Life?"


Revelation 22:19 says, “And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book” (KJV). This verse is usually involved in the debate concerning eternal security. Does Revelation 22:19 mean that, after a person’s name is written in the Lamb’s Book of Life, it can at some time in the future be erased? In other words, can a Christian lose his salvation?


First, Scripture is clear that a true believer is kept secure by the power of God, sealed for the day of redemption (Ephesians 4:30), and of all those whom the Father has given to the Son, He will lose none of them (John 6:39). 


(EMBED IN YOUR THOUGHTS, GOD’S PROMISE, “He will lose none of them”)


The Lord Jesus Christ proclaimed, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father's hand” (John 10:28–29b). Salvation is God’s work, not ours (Titus 3:5), and it is His power that keeps us.


If the “anyone” referred to in Revelation 22:19 are not believers, who are they? In other words, who might want to either add to or take away from the words of the Bible? Most likely, this tampering with God’s Word would be done not by true believers but by those who only profess to be Christians and who suppose that their names are in the Book of Life. Generally speaking, the two main groups who have traditionally tampered with the God’s revelation are pseudo-Christian cults and those who hold to very liberal theological beliefs. Many cults and theological liberals claim the name of Christ as their own, but they are not “born again”—the definitive biblical term for a Christian.


The Bible cites several examples of those who thought they were believers, but whose profession was proven to be false. In John 15, Jesus refers to them as branches that did not remain in Him, the true Vine, and therefore did not produce any fruit. We know they are false because “by their fruits you shall know them” (Matthew 7:16, 20); true disciples will exhibit the fruit of the Holy Spirit who resides within them (Galatians 5:22). In 2 Peter 2:22, false professors are dogs returning to their own vomit and a sow who “after washing herself returns to wallow in the mire” (ESV). The barren branch, the dog, and the pig are all symbols of those who profess to have salvation, but who have nothing more than their own righteousness to rely upon, not the righteousness of Christ that truly saves. It is doubtful that those who have repented of their sin and been born again would willingly tamper with God’s Word in this way—adding to it or taking from it. Purposefully corrupting God’s Word reveals a lack of faith.


There is another important consideration about the meaning of Revelation 22:19, and it involves translation. No early Greek manuscript even mentions the “book of life”; instead, every Greek manuscript has “tree of life.” Here is how Revelation 22:19 reads and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God will take away his share in the tree of life and in the holy city, which are described in this book. -


The KJV stands nearly alone in translating it as the “book” of life. The error arose when Erasmus, in compiling his Greek text, was forced to translate the last six verses of Revelation from the Latin Vulgate into Greek. The “tree” became a “book” because a scribe had accidentally replaced the Latin lingo (“tree”) with libro (“book”). All translations that follow the Textus Receptus, such as the KJV, thus incorrectly say “book” instead of “tree” of life.


Arguing for the “tree of life” translation instead of the “book of life” translation are two other verses in the same chapter: Revelation 22:2 and 14. Both mention the “tree of life” and the “city” together, the same as verse 19 does. Also, the word portion or share is significant. The one who corrupts the Word of God will be deprived of access to the tree of life, despite whatever claim he thinks he has to that fruit.


Revelation 3:5 is another verse that impacts this issue. “He who overcomes . . . I will never blot out his name from the book of life.” The “overcomer” mentioned in this letter to Sardis is the Christian. Compare this with 1 John 5:4: “Everyone who is born of God overcomes the world.” And verse 5: “Who is he that overcomes the world? Only he who believes that Jesus is the Son of God.” (See also 1 John 2:13.) All believers are “overcomers” in that they have been granted victory over the sin and unbelief of the world.


Some people see in Revelation 3:5 the picture of God’s pen poised, ready to strike out the name of any Christian who sins. They read into it something like this: “If you mess up and don’t win the victory, then you’re going to lose your salvation! In fact, I will erase your name from the Book of Life!” But this is NOT what the verse says. Jesus is giving a promise here, not a warning.


Never does Scripture say that God erases a believer’s name from the Lamb's Book of Life—there is never even a warning that He is contemplating it! The wonderful promise of Revelation 3:5 is that Jesus will NOT erase one’s name. Speaking to the “overcomers”—all those redeemed by the blood of the Lamb—Jesus gives His word that He will not delete their names. He affirms that, once a name is there, it is there forever. This is based on the faithfulness of God.


The promise of Revelation 3:5 is directed to believers, who are secure in their salvation. In contrast, the warning of Revelation 22:19 is directed to unbelievers, who, rather than change their hearts toward God, attempt to change God’s Word to suit themselves. Such people will not eat of the tree of life.




“¿Es posible que el nombre de una persona sea borrado del Libro de la Vida?"

Apocalipsis 22:19 dice, “Y si alguno quitare de las palabras del libro de esta profecía, Dios quitará su parte del libro de la vida, y de la santa ciudad y de las cosas que están escritas en este libro.” Este verso generalmente forma parte del debate concerniente a la seguridad eterna. ¿Apocalipsis 22:19 significa que, después de que el nombre de una persona es escrito en el Libro de la Vida del Cordero, puede en algún momento ser borrado en el futuro? En otras palabras ¿puede un cristiano perder su salvación? 


En primer lugar, la Escritura es clara en que la seguridad de un verdadero creyente es mantenida por el poder de Dios, sellado para el día de la redención (Efesios 4:30), y de todos aquellos que el Padre le ha dado al Hijo, Él no perderá a ninguno (Juan 6:39). 


(GRABEN EN SUS PENSAMIENTOS, LA PROMESA DE DIOS: "No perderá ninguno de ellos")


El Señor Jesucristo proclamó, “y yo les doy vida eterna; y no perecerán jamás, ni nadie las arrebatará de mi mano. Mi Padre que me las dio, es mayor que todos, y nadie las puede arrebatar de la mano de mi Padre.” (Juan 10:28-29). La salvación es obra de Dios, no nuestra (Tito 3:5), y es Su poder el que nos guarda. 


Si el “alguno” al que se refiere Apocalipsis 22:19 no son creyentes, entonces ¿quiénes son? En otras palabras, ¿quién podría querer añadir o quitar palabras de la Biblia? Es muy probable que esta alteración de la Palabra de Dios sería hecha, no por verdaderos creyentes, sino por aquellos que solo profesan ser cristianos, y quienes suponen que sus nombres están en el Libro de la Vida. Hablando en términos generales, los dos principales grupos que tradicionalmente han alterado el Apocalipsis, son las sectas pseudo-cristianas, y aquellos que se apoyan en creencias teológicas muy liberales. Muchas sectas y teólogos liberales, proclaman el nombre de Cristo como propio, pero no son nacidos de nuevo – que es el término bíblico definitivo para un cristiano. 


La Biblia cita varios ejemplos de aquellos que pensaron que eran creyentes, pero cuya profesión probó ser falsa. En Juan 15, Jesús se refiere a ellos como pámpanos que no permanecen en Él, la Vid verdadera, y por lo tanto, no producen fruto alguno. Sabemos que son falsos porque “por sus frutos los conoceréis.” (Mateo 7:16, 20). Los verdaderos discípulos exhibirán el fruto del Espíritu Santo que mora en ellos (Gálatas 5:22). En 2 Pedro 2:22, los falsos maestros son como perros que vuelven a su vómito y como la “puerca lavada que vuelve a revolcarse en el cieno.” La rama seca, el perro, y el cerdo, son todos símbolos de aquellos que profesan tener la salvación, pero que no tienen más que su propia justicia en qué apoyarse, no en la justicia de Cristo que es la que realmente salva. 


Es difícil que aquellos que se han arrepentido de sus pecados y han nacido de nuevo, estuvieran dispuestos a alterar la Palabra de Dios de esta manera – añadiéndole o quitando de ella. Desde luego, reconocemos que gente buena ha tenido sinceras diferencias en el área de la crítica textual. Pero puede ser demostrado, que tanto sectarios como liberales, repetidamente han hecho ambas cosas - “añadir” y “quitar” palabras. Por tanto, podemos entender la advertencia de Dios en Apocalipsis 22:19 de esta manera: cualquiera que manipule este mensaje crucial, encontrará que Dios no escribió su nombre en el Libro de la Vida, se le negará el acceso a la Ciudad Santa, y perderá cualquier expectativa de las cosas buenas que Él promete a Sus santos en este libro. 


Desde un punto de vista puramente lógico, ¿por qué un Dios soberano y omnisciente – quien desde el principio sabe lo que acontecerá (Isaías 46:10) – escribiría un nombre en el Libro de la Vida, sabiendo que tendrá que borrarlo cuando esa persona eventualmente apostate y niegue la fe? Además, leyendo esta advertencia dentro del contexto del párrafo en el cual aparece (Apocalipsis 22:6-19), claramente muestra que Dios permanece consistente: solo aquellos que han tomado en cuenta Sus advertencias, se han arrepentido, y han nacido de nuevo, tendrán toda buena expectativa futura en la eternidad. Todos los demás, tristemente, tienen un terrible y aterrador futuro esperándolos. 


Apocalipsis 3:5 es otro verso que impacta este hecho. “El que venciere…. no borraré su nombre del libro de la vida.” El “vencedor” mencionado en esta carta a Sardis es el cristiano. Comparen esto con 1 Juan 5:4: “Porque todo el que es nacido de Dios vence al mundo.” Y el verso 5: “¿Quién es el que vence al mundo, sino el que cree que Jesús es el Hijo de Dios?” (Ver también 1 Juan 2:13) Todos los creyentes son “vencedores” en que se les ha dado la victoria sobre el pecado y la incredulidad del mundo. 


Algunas personas ven en Apocalipsis 3:5 e imaginan la pluma de Dios preparada, lista para tachar el nombre de cualquier cristiano que peca. Ellos leen aquí algo como: -“¡Si fracasas y no ganas la victoria, entonces vas a perder tu salvación! ¡De hecho, borraré tu nombre del Libro de la Vida!”- Pero esto NO es lo que dice el verso. Jesús está dando aquí una promesa, no una advertencia. 


La Escritura nunca dice que Dios borra el nombre de un creyente del Libro de la Vida. ¡No hay siquiera una advertencia de que Él lo esté contemplando! La maravillosa promesa de Apocalipsis 3:5 es que Jesús NO borrará el nombre de uno. Hablando a los “vencedores” – todos aquellos redimidos por la sangre del Cordero – Jesús les da Su palabra, de que no borrará sus nombres. Él afirma que una vez que un nombre está ahí, se quedará ahí para siempre. Esto está basado en la fidelidad de Dios. 


La promesa de Apocalipsis 3:5 está dirigida a los creyentes, que están seguros en su salvación. En contraste, la advertencia de Apocalipsis 22:19 está dirigida a los no creyentes, quienes, en vez de cambiar sus corazones hacia Dios, intentan cambiar la Palabra de Dios a su conveniencia.




07/16/20  


What is the baptism of the Holy Spirit and when does someone receive it?


In short, we receive the Holy Spirit when we receive Christ as Lord and Savior. Paul says in Romans: "You, however, are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him" (Romans 8:9). 


In another epistle, the Apostle states: "In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of it, to the praise of his glory" (Ephesians 1:13–14). So there is no gap between belief in Christ and the receiving of the Holy Spirit.


However, it should be noted that some have tried to teach what is called the "doctrine of subsequence" or "second work of grace," which states that Christians receive some of the Holy Spirit at the time of salvation and then what is called the "baptism of the Holy Spirit" at some time afterwards. A careful examination of Scripture shows this position to be incorrect.


First, the phrase "baptism of the Holy Spirit" appears nowhere in Scripture. Moreover, there is no place in Scripture where the Holy Spirit does the baptizing. Instead, the Bible clearly portrays Christ as the baptizer: "I [John the Baptist] baptize you with water for repentance, but he who is coming after me is mightier than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire" (Matthew 3:11). 


Second, while those supporting the teaching of subsequence point to specific episodes in Acts as proof that a secondary baptism occurs among all believers, closer inspection of both the texts and the historical background of the book undoes their position. 


In Acts 2, a subsequent baptism with the Holy Spirit is certainly seen; however, this is in keeping with Jesus' previous promise to the disciples in Acts 1:5: "you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now." This occurred on Pentecost and was a predominantly Jewish event that inaugurated the Church age. 


In Acts 8, the Samaritans, a race deeply despised by the Jews, were added to the Church. While a subsequent baptism with the Holy Spirit is present in the text, the reasons for it are quite evident. It was important for the Jews to see and experience the fact that the Samaritans were included in the Church, and it was important for the Samaritans to know that the Jewish apostles were the channels of divine truth and that they were to be under apostolic authority.


In Acts 10, the Gentiles—Cornelius and those who were with him—were added to the Church. However, it should be noted that a subsequent baptism does not occur; rather, belief and the baptism with the Spirit occur at the same time.


Such is also the case in Acts 19 with a group of those who had only been exposed to John the Baptist's repentance teaching but nothing more. Belief in Christ and the baptism with the Spirit again occur simultaneously.


It is important to remember that the genre of Acts is that of historical narrative where Luke is recording an important time of historical spiritual transition. Therefore, a distinction must be made between what is descriptive in Acts vs. what is prescriptive. As one theologian has said, "We must not make the tragic mistake of teaching the experience of the apostles, but rather we must experience the teaching of the apostles." 


To be baptized with the Holy Spirit means that Christ places the new believer into the unity of His body and connects him/her with everyone else who also believes in Christ. Baptism with the Spirit makes all believers one. Of this, Paul says, "For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body—Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and all were made to drink of one Spirit" (1 Corinthians 12:13). 


We must not miss the significance of the past tense expression "were all baptized." There is no state of limbo where a person is saved but not a part of the body of Christ.


While the Scripture never commands Christians to be baptized by, with, or of the Holy Spirit, it does charge them to be filled with the Spirit: "And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit" (Ephesians 5:18). But as for the initial gift of the Holy Spirit, that happens at one, and only one, time—at the time of salvation: "There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to the one hope that belongs to your call—one Lord, one faith, one baptism" (Ephesians 4:4–5).




¿Qué es el bautismo del Espíritu Santo y cuando lo recibe uno?


En pocas palabras, recibimos al Espíritu Santo cuando recibimos a Cristo como Señor y Salvador. Pablo dice en Romanos: “Sin embargo, ustedes no viven según la naturaleza pecaminosa sino según el Espíritu, si es que el Espíritu de Dios vive en ustedes. Y si alguno no tiene el Espíritu de Cristo, no es de Cristo” (Romanos 8:9).


En otra epístola, el Apóstol dice: “En él también ustedes, cuando oyeron el mensaje de la verdad, el evangelio que les trajo la salvación y lo creyeron, fueron marcados con el sello que es el Espíritu Santo prometido. Éste garantiza nuestra herencia hasta que llegue la redención final del pueblo adquirido por Dios, para alabanza de su gloria” (Efesios 1:13-14). Entonces no hay un intervalo entre creer en Cristo y recibir el Espíritu Santo. 


Aun así, se debe hablar del hecho que algunos han tratado de enseñar lo que se llama “la doctrina de la subsecuencia” o “segundo trabajo de la gracia”, que dicen que Cristianos reciben una parte del Espíritu Santo al momento de la salvación y luego lo que llaman el “bautismo del Espíritu Santo” más tarde. Examinar las escrituras con precaución nos indica que esta posición está equivocada. 


En primer lugar, la frase “bautismo del Espíritu Santo” no aparece en ninguna parte en las Escrituras. Además, no existe ningún lugar en las Escrituras en el que es el Espíritu Santo quien está bautizando. En lugar, la Biblia claramente representa a Cristo como el que bautiza: “»Yo los bautizo a ustedes con agua para que se arrepientan. Pero el que viene después de mí es más poderoso que yo, y ni siquiera merezco llevarle las sandalias. Él los bautizará con el Espíritu Santo y con fuego” (Mateo 3:11).


En segundo lugar, mientras aquellos que apoyan la enseñanza de la subsecuencia señalan algunos episodios en Hechos como sus pruebas que un segundo bautismo ocurre en la vida de todos los creyentes, al analizar las escrituras y el antecedente histórico del libro vemos que no tienen razón. 


En Hechos 2, un bautismo subsecuente con el Espíritu Santo está claramente presentado; aun así, esto fue parte de la promesa previa de Jesús a sus discípulos en Hechos 1:5: “Juan bautizó con agua, pero dentro de pocos días ustedes serán bautizados con el Espíritu Santo.” Esto ocurrió en Pentecostés y fue predominantemente un evento Judío que presentó la época de la Iglesia. 


En Hechos 8, los Samaritanos, una raza extremamente despreciada por los Judíos, fueron añadidos a la Iglesia. Mientras un bautismo subsecuente con el Espíritu Santo está en el texto, las razones son evidentes. Era importante que los Judíos vieran y vivieran el hecho que los Samaritanos fueron incluidos a la Iglesia, y era importante que los Samaritanos supieran que los Apóstoles Judíos eran los canales de la verdad divina y que tenían autoridad Apostólica.


En Hechos 10, los Gentiles – Cornelio y aquellos que estaban con él – fueron agregados a la Iglesia. Pero, noten que un bautismo subsecuente no ocurre; en lugar, creer y el bautismo con el Espíritu ocurren a la misma vez. 


Es igual en Hechos 19 con un grupo de los que solamente habían oído la predicación del arrepentimiento de Juan el Bautista. Creer en Cristo y el bautismo con el Espíritu ocurren a la misma vez. 


Es importante recordar qué tipo de libro es Hechos, es un narrativo histórico en el que Lucas está anotando un tiempo importante de la transición espiritual histórica. Entonces, una distinción se debe hacer entre lo que es descriptivo en Hechos y lo que es prescriptivo. Como dijo un Teólogo, “No debemos cometer el grave error de enseñar las experiencias de los apóstoles, sino debemos experimentar las enseñanzas de los apóstoles.”


Ser bautizado con el Espíritu Santo significa que Cristo mete al nuevo creyente en la unificación de Su cuerpo y lo conecta con todos los demás que también creen en Cristo. El bautismo con el espíritu unifica a todos los creyentes. Sobre esto, Pablo dice, “Todos fuimos bautizados por un solo Espíritu para constituir un solo cuerpo —ya seamos judíos o gentiles, esclavos o libres—, y a todos se nos dio a beber de un mismo Espíritu”(1 Corintios 12:13).


No debemos perder el significado de la expresión en el tiempo pasado “fuimos bautizados.” No existe una estado de limbo donde una persona es salva pero no es parte del cuerpo de Cristo.


Mientras las Escrituras nunca ordenan que los Cristianos sean bautizados con, por medio o de el Espíritu Santo, sí les ordena de ser llenados con el Espíritu: “No se embriaguen con vino, que lleva al desenfreno. Al contrario, sean llenos del Espíritu” (Efesios 5:18). Pero en cuanto al regalo inicial del Espíritu Santo, eso sucede en un momento, y solo uno, en el momento de la salvación: “Hay un solo cuerpo y un solo Espíritu, así como también fueron llamados a una sola esperanza; un solo Señor, una sola fe, un solo bautismo” (Efesios 4:4-5).



07/15/20  


Yesterday you read


What is Christian redemption? What does it mean to be redeemed?


Be blessed today to learn 


How does the Holy Spirit seal us? What is the seal of the Holy Spirit?


(Rejoice and do not doubt your salvation, with this you give honor and glory to God. He gave his only begotten Son to save you. God has known from eternity past.  This is a humiliating thought, which provokes joy and desire to love God).


In biblical times, a seal was a guarantee. Ephesians 1:13-14 shares regarding the Holy Spirit, "In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of it, to the praise of his glory." According to this passage, the seal of the Holy Spirit takes place at the point of salvation. It is a promise or guarantee of the Christian's future, eternal inheritance with Jesus Christ.


The Greek word translated as "seal" is shragizo that means "to set a seal upon, mark with a seal." A seal could be used to guarantee a document or letter (Esther 3:12), indicate ownership (Song of Songs 8:6), or protect against tampering (Matthew 27:66Revelation 5:1). The Holy Spirit is our seal in every sense of this word.


First, the Holy Spirit in the believer's life helps to guarantee he or she is a child of God. Romans 8:16 shares, "The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God."


Second, the seal of the Holy Spirit serves as a mark that we truly belong to Christ. Romans 8:9-10 teaches, "You, however, are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him. But if Christ is in you, although the body is dead because of sin, the Spirit is life because of righteousness." First Corinthians 6:19-20 also notes, "Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body."


Third, the seal of the Holy Spirit helps protect against tampering or attack. Romans 8:13declares, "For if you live according to the flesh you will die, but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live." In a very real sense, God's Spirit protects us and guarantees our eternity with the Lord.


At what point does the sealing of the Holy Spirit take place? It takes place when a person believes the gospel (Ephesians 1:13John 7:37-39). At that point, God's seal offers the promise of eternal life (John 3:16) because of salvation based on God's grace through faith in Jesus Christ (Ephesians 2:8-9).


The seal of the Holy Spirit offers a wonderful glimpse of God's role in salvation. When we receive salvation in Christ, we are given a guarantee, exchange our ownership for His, and are protected against forces of evil. This seal should provide wonderful encouragement for the believer against the spiritual battles in this life (Ephesians 6:12) and anticipation for the life to come.



Ayer estudiaron 


¿Qué es la redención cristiana?


Sea bendecido o bendecida cuando aprendas 


¿Cómo nos sella el Espíritu Santo?


(Regocíjate y no dudes de tu salvación, con esto le das honra y gloria a Dios.  El entregó a su Hijo Unigénito para salvarte.  El té conoce desde la eternidad pasada.  Este es un pensamiento humillante, que provoca gozo y deseo de amar a Dios). 


En la época de la Biblia, un sello era una garantía. Efesios 1:13-14 comparte sobre el Espíritu Santo, “En él también ustedes, cuando oyeron el mensaje de la verdad, el evangelio que les trajo la salvación, y lo creyeron, fueron marcados con el sello que es el Espíritu Santo prometido. Éste garantiza nuestra herencia hasta que llegue la redención final del pueblo adquirido por Dios, para alabanza de su gloria.”. Según este pasaje, el sello del Espíritu Santo sucede en el momento de la salvación. Es una promesa o garantía del futuro del Cristiano, herencia eterna con Jesucristo. 


En primer lugar, el Espíritu Santo en la vida del creyente ayuda a garantizar que el o ella es un hijo de Dios. Romanos 8:16 comparte, “El Espíritu mismo le asegura a nuestro espíritu que somos hijos de Dios.”.


En segundo lugar, el sello del Espíritu Santo sirve como una maraca de que de veras pertenecemos a Cristo. Romanos 8:9-10 enseña, “Sin embargo, ustedes no viven según la naturaleza pecaminosa sino según el Espíritu, si es que el Espíritu de Dios vive en ustedes. Y si alguno no tiene el Espíritu de Cristo, no es de Cristo. Pero si Cristo está en ustedes, el cuerpo está muerto a causa del pecado, pero el Espíritu que está en ustedes es vida a causa de la justicia.”. 1 Corintios 6:19-20 también dice, “¿Acaso no saben que su cuerpo es templo del Espíritu Santo, quien está en ustedes y al que han recibido de parte de Dios? Ustedes no son sus propios dueños; fueron comprados por un precio. Por tanto, honren con su cuerpo a Dios.”.


En tercer lugar, el sello del Espíritu Santo ayuda a proteger contra ataques o manipulaciones. Romanos 8:13 declara, “Porque si ustedes viven conforme a ella, morirán; pero si por medio del Espíritu dan muerte a los malos hábitos del cuerpo, vivirán.”. En un sentido muy verdadero, el Espíritu de Dios nos protege y nos garantiza la eternidad con nuestro Señor. 


¿A qué punto ocurre el acto de ser sellado del Espíritu Santo? Sucede cuando uno cree en el evangelio (Efesios 1:13; Juan 7:37-39). En aquel instante, el sello de Dios ofrece la promesa de vida eterna (Juan 3:16) porque la salvación está basada sobre la gracia de Dios mediante la fe en Jesucristo (Efesios 2:8-9).


El sello del Espíritu Santo ofrece un vistazo maravilloso del papel de Dios en la salvación. Cuando recibimos la salvación en Cristo, nos dan una garantía, cambiamos nuestra posesión por la Suya, y somos protegidos contra las fuerzas de la maldad. Este sello debería dar apoyo maravilloso al creyente contra sus batallas espirituales en su vida (Efesios 6:12) y anticipación para la vida que sigue.




07/14/20  


What is Christian redemption? What does it mean to be redeemed?


Redemption is a biblical word that means "a purchase" or "a ransom." Historically, redemption was used in reference to the purchase of a slave's freedom. A slave was "redeemed" when the price was paid for his freedom. God spoke of Israel's deliverance from slavery in Egypt in this way: "I am the LORD, and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from slavery to them, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with great acts of judgment" (Exodus 6:6). The use of redemption in the New Testament includes this same idea. Every person is a slave to sin; only through the price Jesus paid on the cross is a sinful person redeemed from sin and death.


In Scripture, it is clear every person stands in need of redemption. Why? Because every person has sinned (Romans 3:23). The following verse then reveals we are "justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus" (Romans 3:24). Hebrews 9:15says that Jesus "is the mediator of a new covenant . . . since a death has occurred that redeems them from the transgressions committed under the first covenant."


Redemption provides several benefits for the believer: eternal life (Revelation 5:9-10), forgiveness of sin (Ephesians 1:7), a right relationship with God (Romans 5:17), peace with God (Colossians 1:18-20), the Holy Spirit to live within (1 Corinthians 6:19-20), and adoption into God's family (Galatians 4:5). Titus 2:13-14 says Jesus "gave himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for himself a people for his own possession."


When we are redeemed, we become different people. When God redeemed Israel from slavery in Egypt, He made them a new nation and gave them a new land. Likewise, the Christian has a new identity in Christ. No longer is the Christian a captive to sin and death. Instead, he has become a citizen of God's kingdom. Christians now live in anticipation of our eternal home with our heavenly Father.


God wants us to see Him as the One who redeems (Isaiah 43:1444:62449:7). Just as Boaz was the kinsman-redeemer of Ruth (Ruth 3:9), Jesus redeems us (Galatians 3:13). Jesus paid a high price for our redemption, the ultimate sacrifice of His own life to free us from sin.



¿Qué es la redención cristiana?


Redención es una palabra bíblica que significa "una compra" o "un rescate". Históricamente, la redención se usó en referencia a la compra de la libertad de un esclavo. Un esclavo era "redimido" cuando se pagaba el precio por su libertad. Dios habló de la liberación de Israel de la esclavitud en Egipto de esta manera: "Yo soy JEHOVÁ; y yo os sacaré de debajo de las tareas pesadas de Egipto, y os libraré de su servidumbre, y os redimiré con brazo extendido, y con juicios grandes" (Éxodo 6: 6-RVR). 


El uso de la redención en el Nuevo Testamento incluye esta misma idea. Toda persona es esclava del pecado; solo a través del precio que Jesús pagó en la cruz una persona pecadora es redimida del pecado y la muerte. 


En las Escrituras, está claro que cada persona necesita redención. ¿Por qué? Porque toda persona ha pecado (Romanos 3:23). El siguiente versículo revela que "[…] por su gracia son justificados gratuitamente mediante la redención que Cristo Jesús efectuó." (Romanos 3:24). 


Hebreos 9:15 dice que "Cristo es mediador de un nuevo pacto, [...] él ha muerto para liberarlos de los pecados cometidos bajo el primer pacto." 


La redención proporciona varios beneficios para el creyente: vida eterna (Apocalipsis 5: 9-10), perdón de pecados (Efesios 1: 7), reconciliación con Dios (Romanos 5:17), paz con Dios (Colosenses 1: 18- 20), residencia del Espíritu Santo en nosotros (1 Corintios 6: 19-20), y la adopción en la familia de Dios (Gálatas 4: 5). Tito 2: 13-14 dice que Jesús "se entregó por nosotros para rescatarnos de toda maldad y purificar para sí un pueblo elegido, dedicado a hacer el bien." 


Cuando somos redimidos, nos convertimos en personas diferentes. Cuando Dios redimió a Israel de la esclavitud en Egipto, los convirtió en una nueva nación y les dio una nueva tierra. Del mismo modo, el cristiano tiene una nueva identidad en Cristo. El cristiano ya no es cautivo del pecado y la muerte. En cambio, se ha convertido en ciudadano del reino de Dios. Los cristianos ahora vivimos anticipando nuestro hogar eterno con nuestro Padre celestial. 


Dios quiere que lo veamos como el que redime (Isaías 43:14; 44: 6, 24; 49: 7). Así como Booz fue el pariente redentor de Rut (Rut 3: 9), Jesús nos redime (Gálatas 3:13). Jesús pagó un alto precio por nuestra redención, el sacrificio último de su propia vida para liberarnos del pecado.




07/13/20  


What is the Truth about salvation?


During one of the sham trials Jesus was subjected to before He was crucified, Pontius Pilate asked Him, "What is truth?" (John 18:38). 


Pilate asked the question mockingly. Pilate did not really care what the truth was and would not have believed it if Jesus had revealed it to him. But Pilate's question is one that we must all wrestle with. What is the Truth about salvation? What is the truth about God? What is the truth about Jesus? 


To ignore these questions is foolish. To be misled on these questions is dangerous. To have the true answers to these truth questions is crucial.


With this lesson you will understand your salvation. While there are many other important truths in the Christian faith, knowing and understanding the truth about salvation is the most important, as it determines where we will spend eternity. Listed below are truths from various areas of the Christian faith as they relate to salvation.


The truth about God

God exists (Psalm 14:1). God created the universe and everything in it, including humanity (Genesis 1:1). God is all-powerful (Job 42:2), all-knowing (1 John 3:20), infinite, and eternal (Psalm 90:2). God is absolutely holy and free from sin (Isaiah 6:3). God is absolutely just and will not allow evil to go unpunished. God is merciful, gracious, and loving (1 John 4:8).


The truth about humanity

God created us to have a personal relationship with Him. God created us with the ability to choose good and evil, and we chose evil. We have all sinned and fall short of God's glory (Romans 3:23). Because of our sin, we deserve death, not just physical death, but eternal death, because our sin is ultimately against an eternal God (Romans 6:23). There is absolutely nothing we can do to rectify our relationship with God on our own (Romans 3:10-18).


The truth about Jesus Christ

Knowing that humanity cannot achieve its own salvation, God took on human form in the person of Jesus Christ (John 1:1,14). God literally became a human being and walked this planet for approximately 33 years, teaching the truth, performing miracles, and living a sinless life. Just as humanity rejects God, so we also rejected God incarnate. Jesus was mercilessly beaten and then crucified (Matthew 27). Jesus willingly sacrificed His life for ours and died on the cross (John 19). Since He was God, His death carried an infinite and eternal value, paying the infinite and eternal price our sins demand (2 Corinthians 5:21). Three days after He died, Jesus was resurrected, demonstrating that His death had sufficiently paid the price for sin (1 Corinthians 16).


The truth about salvation

Because of the perfect and complete sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our sins can be forgiven. God offers us salvation, deliverance, redemption, and forgiveness. The only requirement God demands is that we receive the gift of salvation that He offers us through Jesus Christ (John 3:16). All we have to do is accept it, by faith, trusting in Jesus' sacrifice alone to cover our sins. When we receive salvation by faith in Jesus Christ, our relationship with God is restored and we are promised an eternal home in heaven (Matthew 25:46).


Are you ready and willing to accept these truths? If so, place your faith in Jesus Christ as your Savior. Recognize that you have sinned and are worthy of death. Thank God for providing for your salvation through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Trust the perfect and complete sacrifice of Jesus Christ as the means of your salvation. Recognize that nothing can now separate you from God's love (Romans 8:38-39) and that He will never leave you or forsake you (Hebrews 13:5).


What is the Truth about salvation? There are many truths, and many of them are very important. But, there is only one Truth, and that is Jesus Christ. "I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me" (John 14:6).




¿Cuál es la verdad sobre la salvación?


Durante uno de los juicios falsos a los que Jesús fue sometido antes de ser crucificado, Pilato le preguntó, “Qué es la verdad?” (Juan 18:38). Pilato hizo esta pregunta burlándose. En realidad a Pilato no le interesaba lo que era la verdad, y no lo hubiera creído si Jesús se lo hubiese revelado. Pero la pregunta de Pilato es una con la que todos debemos luchar. ¿Cuál es la verdad sobre la salvación? ¿Cuál es la verdad sobre Dios? ¿Cuál es la verdad sobre Jesús? Ignorar estas preguntas sería tonto. Ser engañado sobre esta pregunta es peligroso. Tener las respuestas verdaderas a estas preguntas de la verdad es sumamente importante.


Propósito de este estudio es que entiendas es la salvación. Aunque hayan muchas otras verdades importantes en la fe Cristiana, saber y entender la verdad sobre la salvación es la más importante, ya que decide donde estarás por toda la eternidad. Debajo hay una lista de verdades de varias áreas de la fe Cristiana con respecto a la salvación.


La verdad sobre Dios

Dios existe (Salmos 14:1). Dios creó el universo y todo en ello, incluso la humanidad (Génesis 1:1). Dios es todo poderoso (Job 42:2), omnisciente (sabe todo) (1 Juan 3:20), infinito, y eterno (Salmos 90:2). Dios es absolutamente santo y sin pecado (Isaías 6:3). Dios es absolutamente justo y no permitirá ningún mal sin ser castigado. Dios es misericordioso, lleno de gracia, y amoroso (1 Juan 4:8).


La verdad sobre la humanidad

Dios nos creó para tener una relación personal con Él. Dios nos creó con la habilidad de decidir el bien o el mal, y escogimos el mal. Todos hemos pecado y estamos destituidos de la gloria de Dios (Romanos 3:23). Por causa de nuestro pecado, merecemos la muerte, no solamente una muerte física, sino eterna, porque nuestro pecado es al final de todo, contra un Dios eterno (Romanos 6:23). No hay absolutamente nada que podemos hacer por nuestra cuenta para remediar nuestra relación con Dios (Romanos 3:10-18).


La verdad sobre Jesucristo

Sabiendo que la humanidad no puede lograr su propia salvación, Dios tomó forma humana en la persona de Jesucristo (Juan 1:1,14). Dios se convirtió literalmente en un ser humano y caminó este planeta por alrededor de 33 años, enseñando la verdad, haciendo milagros, teniendo una vida sin pecado. Así como la humanidad rechaza a Dios, entonces nosotros también, hemos rechazado a Dios encarnado. Jesús fue golpeado sin piedad y luego crucificado (Mateo 27). Jesús voluntariamente sacrificó su vida por la nuestra y murió en la cruz (Juan 19). Como Él era Dios, su muerte llevaba un valor eterno e infinito, pagando el precio eterno e infinito que nuestros pecados exigen (2 Corintios 5:21).


Tres días después de morir, Jesús resucitó , demostrando que su muerte había completamente pagado el precio del pecado (1 Corintios 16).


La verdad sobre la Salvación

Debido al sacrificio perfecto y completo de Jesucristo, nuestros pecados pueden ser perdonados. Dios nos ofrece la salvación, la liberación, y el perdón. La única cosa que Dios requiere de nosotros es recibir este regalo de salvación que nos ofrece por medio de Jesucristo (Juan 3:16). La única cosa que tenemos que hacer es recibirlo, por medio de la fe, fiarnos solamente en el sacrificio de Jesús para cubrir nuestros pecados. Cuando recibimos la salvación por medio de la fe en Jesucristo, nuestra relación con Dios es restaurada y nos promete una hogar eterno en el Paraíso (Mateo 25:46).


¿Estás listo y dispuesto para aceptar estas verdades? Si es así, pon tu fe en Jesucristo como tu salvador. Reconoce que has pecado y que mereces morir. Dale gracias a Dios por proveer por tu salvación por medio de la muerte y resurrección de Jesucristo. Fíate del sacrificio perfecto y completo de Jesucristo como la vía de tu salvación. Reconoce que ya nada puede separarte del amor de Dios (Romanos 8:38-39) y que Él nunca te dejará ni te desamparará (Hebreos 13:5).


¿Cuál es la verdad sobre la salvación? Existen muchas verdades, y muchas de ellas son muy importantes. Pero solo hay una Verdad, y esa es Jesucristo. “Yo soy el camino, y la verdad, y la vida. Nadie viene al Padre, sino por mí“ (Juan 14:6).


¿Has, por medio de la llamada de Dios, aceptado estas verdades que has leído hoy? 




07/12/20  


"What is the true gospel?"


The true gospel is the good news that God saves sinners. Man is by nature sinful and separated from God with no hope of remedying that situation. But God, by His power, provided the means of man's redemption in the death, burial and resurrection of the Savior, Jesus Christ. 


The word "gospel" literally means "good news." But to truly comprehend how good this news is, we must first understand the bad news. As a result of the fall of man in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:6), every part of man"his mind, will, emotions and flesh"have been corrupted by sin. Because of man's sinful nature, he does not and cannot seek God. He has no desire to come to God and, in fact, his mind is hostile toward God (Romans 8:7). God has declared that man's sin dooms him to an eternity in hell, separated from God. It is in hell that man pays the penalty of sin against a holy and righteous God. This would be bad news indeed if there were no remedy. 


But in the gospel, God, in His mercy, has provided that remedy, a substitute for us"Jesus Christ"who came to pay the penalty for our sin by His sacrifice on the cross. This is the essence of the gospel which Paul preached to the Corinthians. In 1 Corinthians 15:2-4, he explains the three elements of the gospel"the death, burial and resurrection of Christ on our behalf. Our old nature died with Christ on the cross and was buried with Him. Then we were resurrected with Him to a new life (Romans 6:4-8). Paul tells us to "hold firmly" to this true gospel, the only one which saves. Believing in any other gospel is to believe in vain. In Romans 1:16-17, Paul also declares that the true gospel is the "power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes" by which he means that salvation is not achieved by man's efforts, but by the grace of God through the gift of faith (Ephesians 2:8-9).


Because of the gospel, through the power of God, those who believe in Christ (Romans 10:9) are not just saved from hell. We are, in fact, given a completely new nature (2 Corinthians 5:17) with a changed heart and a new desire, will, and attitude that are manifested in good works. This is the fruit the Holy Spirit produces in us by His power. Works are never the means of salvation, but they are the proof of it (Ephesians 2:10). Those who are saved by the power of God will always show the evidence of salvation by a changed life.




“¿Qué es el verdadero Evangelio?"

El verdadero Evangelio son las buenas noticias de que Dios salva a los pecadores. El hombre es pecador por naturaleza y está separado de Dios sin esperanza alguna de remediar tal situación. Pero Dios ha provisto los medios para la redención del hombre; en la muerte, sepultura y resurrección del Salvador, Jesucristo. 


La palabra “evangelio” significa literalmente “buenas nuevas.” Pero para comprender verdaderamente que tan buenas son estas noticias, debemos entender primeramente las malas noticias. Como resultado de la caída del hombre en el Jardín del Edén (Génesis 3:6), cada parte del hombre – su mente, voluntad, emociones y carne – han sido contaminadas por el pecado. Por la naturaleza pecadora del hombre, él no busca ni puede buscar a Dios. Él no tiene el deseo de venir a Dios y, de hecho, su mente mantiene una hostilidad hacia Dios (Romanos 8:7). Dios ha declarado que el pecado del hombre lo condena a una eternidad en el infierno, separado de Él. Es en el infierno donde el hombre paga el castigo por pecar contra un Dios santo y justo. Ciertamente estas serían malas noticias, si no existiera un remedio. 


Pero en el Evangelio, Dios, en Su misericordia, ha provisto ese remedio, un sustituto para nosotros – Jesucristo – quien vino a pagar el castigo por nuestro pecado, mediante Su sacrificio en la cruz. Esta es la esencia del Evangelio que Pablo predicaba a los corintios. En 1 Corintios 15:2-4, él explica los tres elementos del Evangelio – la muerte, sepultura, y resurrección de Cristo a nuestro favor. Nuestra vieja naturaleza murió con Cristo en la cruz y fue sepultada con Él. Entonces nosotros fuimos resucitados con Él a una nueva vida (Romanos 6:4-8). Pablo nos dice que nos “sujetemos firmemente” a este verdadero Evangelio, el único que salva. Creer en cualquier otro evangelio es creer en vano. En Romanos 1:16-17, Pablo también declara que el verdadero Evangelio “Es poder de Dios para salvación a todo aquel que cree,” con lo cual él nos dice que la salvación no se logra mediante el esfuerzo del hombre, sino por la gracia de Dios a través del don de la fe (Efesios 2:8-9).


Mediante el Evangelio, a través del poder de Dios, aquellos que creen en Cristo (Romanos 10:9) no solo son salvados del infierno. De hecho, nos es dada toda una nueva naturaleza (2 Corintios 5:17) con un corazón cambiado y un nuevo deseo, voluntad, y actitud que son manifestados en buenas obras. Este es el fruto que el Espíritu Santo produce en nosotros por Su poder. Las obras nunca son los medios para la salvación, pero sí son la prueba de ella (Efesios 2:10). Aquellos que son salvados por el poder de Dios, siempre mostrarán la evidencia de la salvación por medio de una vida transformada.




07/11/20  


Why won't being a good person get me to heaven?


Many believe that if they try hard in this life to do good, that God will accept them into heaven when they die. Yet the Bible makes clear that getting into heaven is not something we can accomplish in our own power. Ephesians 2:8-9 clearly teach, "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." Being saved from sin and receiving eternal life cannot take place by our works. Getting into heaven requires faith in Jesus Christ.


Why is getting into heaven based on faith? Heaven is a perfect place that is free from sin. Yet every person except Jesus has sinned. Romans 3:23 teaches, "All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God." Ecclesiastes 7:20 adds, "Surely there is not a righteous man on earth who does good and never sins." No matter how hard you may try, even one sin is enough to keep you from heaven unless you have placed your faith in Jesus Christ.


The good news of the Bible is that, "while we were still sinners, Christ died for us" (Romans 5:8). He knew we would each fail, sin, and lack the ability to enter heaven apart from Him. He died in our place, offering Himself as the way, the truth, and the life (John 14:6) that would allow us access to heaven by faith in Him.


Can anyone come to faith in Jesus Christ and receive eternal life? Yes! In John 3:16 Jesus promised, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life." This "whoever" includes you.


How can a person place his or her faith in Jesus Christ and receive eternal life in heaven? Romans 10:9 answers, "if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved." Salvation occurs when we accept Jesus as Lord and believe He rose again from the dead.


When we do, we can be confident that He will accept us. Romans 8:1 teaches, "There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus." First John 5:13 adds that we can know for certain that we are saved and will spend eternity with the Lord when we die: "I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God that you may know that you have eternal life."


Have you been trusting in your own efforts and goodness to receive eternal life? Today, you can place your faith in Jesus and know for certain you will have eternal life.



¿Por qué ser una buena persona no me llevará al cielo?


Muchos creen que si se esfuerzan a hacer el bien en esta vida, Dios les concederá la entrada al paraíso cuando se mueran. Pero la Biblia dice claramente que nuestra entrada al Paraíso no depende de algo que hacemos por nuestra propia cuenta. Efesios 2:8-9 enseña, “Porque por gracia han sido salvados mediante la fe; esto no procede de ustedes, sino que es el regalo de Dios, no por obras, para que nadie se jacte.” Ser salvado del pecado y recibir la vida eterna no puede suceder por medio de nuestras obras. La entrada al Paraíso requiere fe en Jesucristo. 


¿Por qué la entrada al Paraíso depende de la fe? El Paraíso es un lugar perfecto en el que no hay pecado. Aún así todos menos Jesús ha pecado. Romanos 3:23 enseña, “pues todos han pecado y están privados de la gloria de Dios.” Eclesiastés 7:20 añade, “No hay en la tierra nadie tan justo que haga el bien y nunca peque.” No importa cuanto te esfuerces, solo necesitas un pecado para que no puedas entrar al Paraíso, a menos que hayas puesto tu fe en Jesucristo. 


La buena noticia de la Biblia es que, “cuando todavía éramos pecadores, Cristo murió por nosotros” (Romanos 5:8). Él sabía que todos hubiéramos fracasado, pecado, y sin la posibilidad de poder entrar al Paraíso sin Él. Él murió en nuestro lugar, ofreciéndose como el camino, la verdad y la vida (Juan 14:6) que nos daría acceso al Paraíso mediante la fe en Él. 


¿Puede cualquiera llegar a creer en Jesucristo y recibir la vida eterna? ¡Sí! En Juan 3:16Jesús prometió, “Porque tanto amó Dios al mundo, que dio a su Hijo unigénito, para que todo el que cree en él no se pierda, sino que tenga vida eterna.” “Todo el que cree” te incluye a ti. 


¿Cómo puede uno poner su fe en Jesucristo y recibir la vida eterna en el Paraíso? Romanos 10:9 responde, “si confiesas con tu boca que Jesús es el Señor, y crees en tu corazón que Dios lo levantó de entre los muertos, serás salvo.” La salvación ocurre cuando aceptamos a Jesús como Señor y creemos que resucitó de entre los muertos.


Cuando lo hacemos, podemos confiar que nos aceptará. Romanos 8:1 enseña, “Por lo tanto, ya no hay ninguna condenación para los que están unidos a Cristo Jesús” 1 Juan 5:13 añade que podemos saber con certeza que estamos salvados y que pasaremos la eternidad con nuestro Señor cuando moriremos: “Les escribo estas cosas a ustedes, que creen en el nombre del Hijo de Dios, para que sepan que tienen vida eterna.” 


¿Has estado fiándote de tu propio esfuerzo y bondad para recibir la vida eterna? Hoy puedes poner tu fe en Jesús y saber con certeza que tendrás la vida eterna.





07/10/20  


How can I get right with God?


When people say they would like to "get right with God," they usually mean they desire to stop some kind of wrong behavior and begin living for Him. In order to get right with God, however, a person must realize what is actually wrong.


The barrier that keeps us from being right with God is sin. Romans 3:23 teaches, "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God." This sin separates us from God: "For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord" (Romans 6:23). The only solution is to receive eternal life from Jesus Christ.


How can you receive eternal life? Jesus taught that eternal life comes by faith: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life" (John 3:16). You must believe in Jesus to escape death and the punishment for your sins and have eternal life in heaven with Jesus.


What does it mean to believe in Jesus? Romans 10:9 shares, "if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved." First, you must believe Jesus is Lord. Second, you must accept that Jesus literally rose again from the dead. He defeated death to prove His power as God's Son and offer eternal life to you.


Jesus shared a powerful example of His love in the account of the prodigal son in Luke 15. The son had left his father and wasted his inheritance. His only means of survival was working with livestock. He even craved the food the pigs ate. At his lowest point he decided to return home and ask his father if he could work as a servant. As he returned, his father saw him in the distance. The father ran to him, hugged him, and declared a celebration in the son's honor, saying, "For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found" (Luke 15:24).


Today Jesus offers the same love this father offered to his lost son. If you will turn to Jesus, He will accept you and celebrate your decision to believe in Him.


There is no special prayer you must say to get right with God. However, if you would like to accept Jesus as your Savior and know for certain you have eternal life, you can tell God with a prayer similar to this:


"Dear God, I realize I am a sinner and could never reach heaven by my own good deeds. Right now I place my faith in Jesus Christ as God's Son who took the punishment for my sins and rose from the dead to give me eternal life and restore me to rightness with you. Please forgive me of my sins and help me to live for you. Thank you for accepting me and giving me eternal life."




¿Cómo puedo hacer las paces con Dios?


Cuando las personas dicen que les gustaría " hacer las paces con Dios", generalmente quieren decir que desean detener algún tipo de comportamiento incorrecto y comenzar a vivir para Él. Sin embargo, para hacer las paces con Dios, una persona debe darse cuenta de lo que realmente está mal. 


La barrera que nos impide hacer las paces con Dios es el pecado. Romanos 3:23 enseña, "Todos han pecado y están privados de la gloria de Dios". Este pecado nos separa de Dios: "Porque la paga del pecado es muerte, mientras que la dádiva de Dios es vida eterna en Cristo Jesús, nuestro Señor." (Romanos 6:23). La única solución es recibir la vida eterna de Jesucristo. 


¿Cómo puedes recibir la vida eterna? Jesús enseñó que la vida eterna viene por fe: "Porque tanto amó Dios al mundo que dio a su Hijo unigénito, para que todo el que cree en él no se pierda, sino que tenga vida eterna." (Juan 3:16). Debes creer en Jesús para escapar de la muerte y el castigo por tus pecados y tener vida eterna en el cielo con Jesús. 


¿Qué significa creer en Jesús? Romanos 10: 9 comparte: "Si confiesas con tu boca que Jesús es el Señor y crees en tu corazón que Dios lo levantó de entre los muertos, serás salvo." Primero, debes creer que Jesús es el Señor. Segundo, debes aceptar que Jesús literalmente resucitó de entre los muertos. Él venció a la muerte para probar su poder como el Hijo de Dios y ofrecerte vida eterna. 


Jesús compartió un poderoso ejemplo de su amor en el relato del hijo pródigo en Lucas 15. El hijo dejó a su padre y desperdició su herencia. Su único medio de supervivencia era trabajar con ganado. Incluso ansiaba la comida que comían los cerdos. En su punto más bajo, decidió regresar a casa y preguntarle a su padre si podía trabajar como sirviente. Cuando regresó, su padre lo vio a lo lejos. El padre corrió hacia él, lo abrazó y declaró una celebración en honor del hijo, diciendo: "Porque este hijo mío estaba muerto, pero ahora ha vuelto a la vida; se había perdido, pero ya lo hemos encontrado”. " (Lucas 15:24). 


Hoy Jesús ofrece el mismo amor que este padre ofreció a su hijo perdido. Si te vuelves a Jesús, él te aceptará y celebrará tu decisión de creer en él. 


No hay una oración especial que debes decir para estar bien con Dios. Sin embargo, si deseas aceptar a Jesús como tu Salvador y saber con certeza que tienes vida eterna, puedes hacer una oración a Dios similar a esta: 


"Querido Dios, me doy cuenta de que soy un pecador y que nunca podría alcanzar el cielo por mis buenas obras. En este momento pongo mi fe en Jesucristo como el Hijo de Dios, quien recibió el castigo por mis pecados y resucitó de los muertos para darme vida eterna. Restáurame a una relación correcta contigo. Por favor, perdona mis pecados y ayúdame a vivir para ti. Gracias por aceptarme y darme la vida eterna ".




07/09/20  FACEBOOK 


Is it possible for a person to believe in some way and yet not be saved?


Salvation is by God's grace and is received through faith. Faith implies not only intellectual assent, but action. The illustration of a chair is commonly used. To truly have faith in a chair, one must sit in it. A person can "believe" that the chair will support their weight. They may even recognize they have a need to be supported by the chair. But they do not exercise faith until they actually sit in the chair. Similarly, a person can "believe" in some senses of the word without actually being saved. 


James 2:19 says, "You believe that God is one; you do well. Even the demons believe—and shudder!" Believing that God exists is not saving faith. To be saved, a person must acknowledge that it is the God of the Bible who exists, that we have all sinned and are deserving of punishment (Romans 3:23; 6:23), that we cannot save ourselves (Ephesians 2:8–9), and that the only means of salvation is through Jesus Christ (John 14:6; Acts 4:12). The fact of the existence of God is evident to everyone (Romans 1:20). Acknowledging this fact is not sufficient for salvation. 


What about someone who "believes" in Jesus? Admitting that Jesus was a good teacher or even a prophet is not saving faith. We must acknowledge that Jesus is God in human flesh, lived a perfect life, died in our place, and rose again from the dead to conquer death and sin and offer the gift of salvation. In Matthew 7:21–23 Jesus, said, "Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. On that day many will say to me, 'Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?' And then will I declare to them, 'I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.'" Some have erroneously used this passage to suggest that salvation can be lost. Jesus is not saying that we must work to maintain salvation or that we can lose salvation. These are people that Jesus never knew. People may pay lip-service to Jesus or even be involved in ministry without actually knowing Him. They appear to acknowledge Jesus and yet have no relationship with Him. They have not been born again. 


Jesus also talked about those who may initially respond positively to the gospel, and yet never really be saved. The parable of the sower in Matthew 13 talks about this. We see one example in Judas, who was a disciple of Jesus and yet betrayed Him. Judas appeared to follow Jesus, yet he ultimately did not truly believe Him. In John 6 we learn about people who had followed Jesus and listened to His teachings, but Jesus knew that some of them didn't believe, and many then turned away from Him. 


Salvation is by God's grace alone and received through faith. Faith implies some action on our part, it is a reliance on God. Belief unto salvation is a belief that transforms us. It isn't an intellectual agreement only, but a recognition of our hopelessness apart from God and His gracious offer to save us. Then we act on that belief by putting our faith in Jesus. As a result, we are born again, invited into relationship with God, and our lives are changed. 




¿Es posible que una persona crea de alguna manera y sin embargo no se salve? 


 La salvación es por la gracia de Dios y se recibe a través de la fe. La fe implica no solo asentimiento intelectual, sino acción. La ilustración de una silla se usa comúnmente. Para tener verdadera fe en una silla, uno debe sentarse en ella. Una persona puede "creer" que la silla soportará su peso. Incluso pueden reconocer que necesitan ser apoyados por la silla. Pero no ejercen fe hasta que realmente se sientan en la silla. Del mismo modo, una persona puede "creer" en algunos sentidos de la palabra sin ser salvada. 


Santiago 2:19 dice: "19 Tú crees que Dios es uno; bien haces. También los demonios creen, y tiemblan." Creer que Dios existe no es fe salvadora. Para ser salvo, una persona debe reconocer que es el Dios de la Biblia quien existe, que todos hemos pecado y merecemos castigo (Romanos 3:23; 6:23), que no podemos salvarnos a nosotros mismos (Efesios 2: 8 –9), y que el único medio de salvación es a través de Jesucristo (Juan 14: 6; Hechos 4:12). El hecho de la existencia de Dios es evidente para todos (Romanos 1:20). Reconocer este hecho no es suficiente para la salvación. 


 ¿Qué pasa con alguien que "cree" en Jesús? Admitir que Jesús fue un buen maestro o incluso un profeta no es fe salvadora. Debemos reconocer que Jesús es Dios en carne humana, vivió una vida perfecta, murió en nuestro lugar y resucitó de entre los muertos para conquistar la muerte y el pecado y ofrecer el regalo de la salvación. En Mateo 7: 21–23, Jesús dijo: "No todos los que me dicen 'Señor, Señor' entrarán en el reino de los cielos, sino el que hace la voluntad de mi Padre que está en los cielos. 


Ese día muchos me dirán: 'Señor, Señor, ¿no profetizamos en tu nombre, y echamos fuera demonios en tu nombre, y hicimos muchas obras poderosas en tu nombre?' Y luego les declararé: 'Nunca te conocí; apártate de mí, trabajadores de la anarquía' ". Algunos han usado erróneamente este pasaje para sugerir que la salvación puede perderse. Jesús no está diciendo que debemos trabajar para mantener la salvación o que podemos perder la salvación. Estas son personas que Jesús nunca conoció. Las personas pueden hacerle bromas a Jesús o incluso participar en el ministerio sin conocerlo realmente. Parecen reconocer a Jesús y, sin embargo, no tienen relación con él. No han nacido de nuevo.


Jesús también habló acerca de aquellos que inicialmente pueden responder positivamente al evangelio y, sin embargo, nunca se salvan realmente. La parábola del sembrador en Mateo 13 habla de esto. Vemos un ejemplo en Judas, quien fue discípulo de Jesús y, sin embargo, lo traicionó. Judas pareció seguir a Jesús, pero finalmente no le creyó realmente. En Juan 6 aprendemos acerca de las personas que habían seguido a Jesús y escuchado sus enseñanzas, pero Jesús sabía que algunos de ellos no creían, y muchos luego se alejaron de Él. 


 La salvación es solo por la gracia de Dios y recibida a través de la fe. La fe implica alguna acción de nuestra parte, es una dependencia de Dios. Creer en la salvación es una creencia que nos transforma. No es solo un acuerdo intelectual, sino un reconocimiento de nuestra desesperanza aparte de Dios y su generosa oferta para salvarnos. Luego actuamos sobre esa creencia al poner nuestra fe en Jesús. Como resultado, nacemos de nuevo, somos invitados a una relación con Dios, y nuestras vidas cambian.




07/08/20  


“If you doubt your salvation, does that mean you are not truly saved?"


Most believers, at one time or another, have doubted their salvation. There can be several causes of doubt, some valid and some not. If you doubt your salvation, there are some steps you can take to find reassurance, dispel the doubts, and rest in the promises of God.


First, it is good to know that whether or not you have doubts is not what determines your salvation. Some genuine believers struggle with doubt, while some unbelievers who presume to be saved never have a doubting moment (and they will have a rude awakening someday—see Matthew 7:21–23). So it is not automatic that the presence of doubt indicates a lack of salvation, or that the absence of doubt attests to salvation.


One reason people doubt their salvation is the presence of sin in their lives. Hebrews 12:1 speaks of “sin that so easily entangles.” Many true Christians struggle against “besetting,” that is, habitual sins, and this may cause them to doubt their salvation. It is important here to recognize that, despite the Christian’s being a new creation in Christ, everyone still sins. “We all stumble in many ways” (James 3:2). No one reaches a state of sinless perfection in this world. The difference for the believer is the attitude toward sin and the response to it. As Adrian Rogers said, “Before I got saved I was running to sin; now I am running from it. And if I fail, I turn right around and start running away again”


It is also important to know that the presence of sin in one’s life can be a sign that you are not saved. The Bible is clear that willful, unrepentant sin is an indicator of an untransformed heart (see 1 John 3:6, 9; Romans 6:1–2). If you are living a lifestyle that the Bible condemns as sinful, then there is a spiritual problem. Do Christians sin? Yes. Do they willfully continue in sin? No.


If you doubt your salvation because of sin in your life, then confess the sin to God and ask for His forgiveness for Jesus’ sake. Then take steps to not repeat the sin: “Prove by the way you live that you have repented of your sins and turned to God” (Luke 3:8, NLT). The very fact that you recognize sin and struggle against it in your own life is proof that the Holy Spirit is at work. Cooperate with what He is doing.


Another reason people doubt their salvation is the absence of godly works in their lives. The Christian life involves more than turning from sin; it includes doing good. Jesus said that “every good tree bears good fruit” (Matthew 7:17), and Paul wrote, “Let our people learn to devote themselves to good works, so as to help cases of urgent need, and not be unfruitful” (Titus 3:14). There are some who inspect the “fruit” of their own lives, find it lacking, and wonder if they are truly saved. Their mistrust that they are a “good tree” could be because 1) they have set a higher standard for themselves than God has, minimizing what God is doing through them; 2) they are foolishly measuring themselves against others and their fruit (see 2 Corinthians 10:12); 3) they are being lax in their pursuit of good works; or 4) they are not saved and therefore do not have the motivating love of Christ.


If you doubt your salvation because of a lack of good works, then confess the sin of omission to God and ask for His forgiveness for Jesus’ sake. Then it is time to “stir up the gift of God which is in you” (2 Timothy 1:6, NKJV). There’s plenty of work to do for the kingdom (Luke 10:2), and the Bible gives plenty of direction about the will of God, generally, for Christians. Be careful not to set up false performance standards or compare your good deeds with others’. Ask God what He would have you do, and do that.


Some people, especially those who were saved at a very young age, doubt their salvation because they don’t remember their conversion very well, and they wonder if the decision they made as a child was genuine. Such feelings are common in adults who were saved as children. In such cases, it is good to review the promises of God and remember that Jesus invites children to come to Him (Mark 10:14). Salvation is based on the grace of God and faith in Christ, not our knowledge, wisdom, or sophistication (Ephesians 2:8–9). Jesus promised that those who are His will “never perish” (John 10:28). If doubts persist about the genuineness of your childhood conversion, make sure of your faith. Regardless of what you did as a child, do you believe now that Jesus died for your sins and rose again? Are you placing your faith in Him alone?


Another reason for the presence of doubt concerning salvation is persistent guilt over past sins. We all have regrets about past misdeeds, and we all have a spiritual enemy that the Bible calls “the accuser” (Revelation 12:10). The combination of regrets and accusations can spur much doubt. Fortunately, “the one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world” (1 John 4:4). If you doubt your salvation because of guilty feelings, then ask yourself, “Were those sins over which I feel guilty confessed to God?” If so, then know this: God has removed that sin from you “as far as the east is from the west” (Psalm 103:12). This promise stands forever: “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).


Sometimes, doubting is a good thing. Doubt can, like pain, alert us to a problem that needs addressed. We are to test ourselves to be sure that we are “in the faith” (2 Corinthians 13:5). Be sure that you are born again. If you have trusted Christ as your Savior, then you have eternal life, and God wants you to be confident of your salvation (Romans 8:38–39; 1 John 5:13).





Si dudas de tu salvación, ¿quiere decir que realmente no eres salvo?



Todos tenemos dudas ocasionales. Ya sea que tengas dudas o no, eso no es lo que determina si eres un cristiano. Aún cuando un creyente sea infiel, Dios es fiel (2 Timoteo 2:13). Dios quiere que estemos seguros y confiados de nuestra salvación (Romanos 8:38-39; 1 Juan 5:13). Dios promete que todos los que creen en Jesucristo serán salvos (Juan 3:16; Romanos 10:9-10). Todos hemos pecado y estamos destituidos de la gloria de Dios (Romanos 3:23). Como resultado, merecemos la muerte y una eternidad apartados de Dios (Romanos 6:23). Pero Dios nos amó tanto como para morir en nuestro lugar, tomando sobre Él el castigo que todos merecíamos (Romanos 5:8). Como resultado, todos aquellos que creen están salvados y eternamente seguros. 


Algunas veces dudar es algo bueno. Pablo nos dice en 2 Corintios 13:5, “Examinaos a vosotros mismos si estáis en la fe.” Debemos probarnos a nosotros mismos de estar seguros de que Jesús sea verdaderamente nuestro Salvador, y el Espíritu Santo verdaderamente esté en nosotros. Si Él lo está, entonces de ninguna manera podemos perder la salvación que Cristo ha obtenido para nosotros (Romanos 8:38-39). Si no lo está, entonces tal vez el Espíritu Santo está convenciéndonos de pecado y guiándonos al arrepentimiento para ser reconciliados con Dios a través de Cristo. La seguridad de nuestra salvación proviene del conocimiento de que una vez que estamos en Cristo, estamos eternamente seguros. Pero la genuina fe salvadora es evidenciada por sus obras (Santiago 2:14-26), y el fruto del Espíritu en nosotros (Gálatas 5:22). La falta de esta evidencia puede ser a veces la causa de nuestras dudas. 


¿Has puesto tu fe en Cristo? Si la respuesta es sí, entonces desecha tus dudas y confía en Dios. Si conoces a Jesús como tu Salvador, ¡sin duda alguna eres salvo! Si la respuesta es no, entonces ¡cree en el Señor Jesucristo y serás salvo!




07/07/20  


“What is repentance and is it necessary for salvation?"


Many understand the term repentance to mean “a turning from sin.” Regretting sin and turning from it is related to repentance, but it is not the precise meaning of the word. In the Bible, the word repent means “to change one’s mind.” The Bible also tells us that true repentance will result in a change of actions (Luke 3:8–14; Acts 3:19). In summarizing his ministry, Paul declares, “I preached that they should repent and turn to God and demonstrate their repentance by their deeds” (Acts 26:20). The full biblical definition of repentance is a change of mind that results in a change of action.


What, then, is the connection between repentance and salvation? The book of Acts especially focuses on repentance in regard to salvation (Acts 2:38; 3:19; 11:18; 17:30; 20:21; 26:20). To repent, in relation to salvation, is to change your mind in regard to sin and Jesus Christ. In Peter’s sermon on the day of Pentecost (Acts chapter 2), he concludes with a call for the people to repent (Acts 2:38). Repent from what? Peter is calling the people who rejected Jesus (Acts 2:36) to change their minds about that sin and to change their minds about Christ Himself, recognizing that He is indeed “Lord and Christ” (Acts 2:36). Peter is calling the people to change their minds, to abhor their past rejection of Christ, and to embrace faith in Him as both Messiah and Savior.


Repentance involves recognizing that you have thought wrongly in the past and determining to think rightly in the future. The repentant person has “second thoughts” about the mindset he formerly embraced. There is a change of disposition and a new way of thinking about God, about sin, about holiness, and about doing God’s will. True repentance is prompted by “godly sorrow,” and it “leads to salvation” (2 Corinthians 7:10).


Repentance and faith can be understood as two sides of the same coin. It is impossible to place your faith in Jesus Christ as the Savior without first changing your mind about your sin and about who Jesus is and what He has done. Whether it is repentance from willful rejection or repentance from ignorance or disinterest, it is a change of mind. Biblical repentance, in relation to salvation, is changing your mind from rejection of Christ to faith in Christ.


Repentance is not a work we do to earn salvation. No one can repent and come to God unless God pulls that person to Himself (John 6:44). Repentance is something God gives—it is only possible because of His grace (Acts 5:31; 11:18). No one can repent unless God grants repentance. All of salvation, including repentance and faith, is a result of God drawing us, opening our eyes, and changing our hearts. God’s longsuffering leads us to repentance (2 Peter 3:9), as does His kindness (Romans 2:4).


While repentance is not a work that earns salvation, repentance unto salvation does result in works. It is impossible to truly change your mind without that causing a change in action. In the Bible, repentance results in a change in behavior. That is why John the Baptist called people to “produce fruit in keeping with repentance” (Matthew 3:8). A person who has truly repented of his sin and exercised faith in Christ will give evidence of a changed life (2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 5:19–23; James 2:14–26).


To see what repentance looks like in real life, all we need to do is turn to the story of Zacchaeus. Here was a man who cheated and stole and lived lavishly on his ill-gotten gains—until he met Jesus. At that point he had a radical change of mind: “Look, Lord!” said Zacchaeus. “Here and now I give half of my possessions to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody out of anything, I will pay back four times the amount” (Luke 19:8). Jesus happily proclaimed that salvation had come to Zacchaeus’s house, and that even the tax collector was now “a son of Abraham” (verse 9)—a reference to Zacchaeus’s faith. The cheat became a philanthropist; the thief made restitution. That’s repentance, coupled with faith in Christ.


Repentance, properly defined, is necessary for salvation. Biblical repentance is changing your mind about your sin—no longer is sin something to toy with; it is something to be forsaken as we “flee from the coming wrath” (Matthew 3:7). It is also changing your mind about Jesus Christ—no longer is He to be mocked, discounted, or ignored; He is the Savior to be clung to; He is the Lord to be worshiped and adored.




“¿Qué es el arrepentimiento y es éste necesario para la salvación?"


Muchos entienden el término “arrepentimiento” como “volverse del pecado”. Esta no es la definición bíblica del arrepentimiento. En la Biblia, la palabra “arrepentirse” significa “cambiar tu mente”. La Biblia también nos dice que el verdadero arrepentimiento tendrá como resultado un cambio de conducta (Lucas 3:8-14; Hechos 3:19). Hechos 26:20 declara, “sino que anuncié......, que se arrepintiesen y se convirtiesen a Dios, haciendo obras dignas de arrepentimiento”. La completa definición bíblica del arrepentimiento, es cambiar de mentalidad, que resulta en un cambio de acciones y actitudes. 


¿Cuál es entonces la conexión entre el arrepentimiento y la salvación? El Libro de Los Hechos parece enfocarse especialmente en el arrepentimiento con respecto a la salvación. (Hechos 2:38; 3:19; 11:18; 17:30; 20:21; 26:20). El arrepentimiento, relacionado con la salvación, es cambiar tu parecer respecto a Jesucristo. En el sermón de Pedro en el día de Pentecostés (Hechos capítulo 2), él concluye con un llamado a la gente a arrepentirse (Hechos 2:38). ¿Arrepentirse de qué? Pedro está llamando a la gente que rechazaba a Jesús (Hechos 2:36), para que cambiaran su idea acerca de Él, que reconocieran que Él es verdaderamente “Señor y Cristo” (Hechos 2:36). Pedro está exhortando a la gente a cambiar su mentalidad del rechazo a Cristo como el Mesías, a la fe en Él como Mesías y Salvador. 


El arrepentimiento y la fe pueden ser entendidos como “dos lados de la misma moneda”. Es imposible poner tu fe en Jesucristo como el Salvador, sin primeramente cambiar tu mentalidad acerca de quién es Él, y lo que Él ha hecho. Ya sea el arrepentirse de un rechazo obstinado, o arrepentirse de ignorancia y desinterés – es un cambio de mentalidad. El arrepentimiento bíblico, en relación con la salvación, es cambiar tu mentalidad del rechazo a Cristo a la fe en Cristo. 


Es crucialmente importante que entendamos que el arrepentimiento no es una obra que hagamos para ganar la salvación. Nadie puede arrepentirse y venir a Dios, a menos que Dios atraiga a esa persona hacia Él (Juan 6:44). Hechos 5:31 y 11:17 indican que el arrepentimiento es algo que da Dios – sólo es posible por Su gracia. Nadie puede arrepentirse a menos que Dios le conceda el arrepentimiento. Toda la salvación, incluyendo el arrepentimiento y la fe, es el resultado de Dios acercándonos, abriendo nuestros ojos, y cambiando nuestros corazones. La paciencia de Dios nos conduce al arrepentimiento (2 Pedro 3:9), como lo hace Su bondad (Romanos 2:4). 


Mientras que el arrepentimiento no es una obra que gana la salvación, el arrepentimiento para salvación da como resultado las obras. Es imposible verdadera y totalmente cambiar tu mentalidad sin que esto cause un cambio en tus actos. En la Biblia, el arrepentimiento resulta en un cambio de conducta. Esta es la razón por la que Juan el Bautista exhortaba a la gente con estas palabras, “Haced, pues, frutos dignos de arrepentimiento” (Mateo 3:8). Una persona que verdaderamente se ha arrepentido y ha pasado de rechazar a Cristo a la fe en Cristo, lo hará evidente por un cambio en su vida (2 Corintios 5:17; Gálatas 5:19-23; Santiago 2:14-26). 


El arrepentimiento, propiamente definido, es necesario para la salvación. El arrepentimiento bíblico es cambiar tu parecer acerca de Jesucristo y volverte a Dios en fe para salvación (Hechos 3:19). Volverse del pecado no es la definición del arrepentimiento, pero es uno de los resultados de la fe genuina basada en el arrepentimiento respecto al Señor Jesucristo. 




07/06/20  


"How can I have assurance of my salvation?"


Answer: Many followers of Jesus Christ look for the assurance of salvation in the wrong places. We tend to seek assurance of salvation in the things God is doing in our lives, in our spiritual growth, in the good works and obedience to God’s Word that is evident in our Christian walk. While these things can be evidence of salvation, they are not what we should base the assurance of our salvation on. Rather, we should find the assurance of our salvation in the objective truth of God’s Word. We should have confident trust that we are saved based on the promises God has declared, not because of our subjective experiences.


How can you have assurance of salvation? Consider 1 John 5:11–13: “And this is the testimony: God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life.” Who is it that has the Son? It is those who have believed in Him (John 1:12). If you have Jesus, you have life. Not temporary life, but eternal.


God wants us to have assurance of our salvation. We should not live our Christian lives wondering and worrying each day whether or not we are truly saved. That is why the Bible makes the plan of salvation so clear. Believe in Jesus Christ (John 3:16; Acts 16:31). “If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved” (Romans 10:9). Have you repented? Do you believe that Jesus died to pay the penalty for your sins and rose again from the dead (Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 5:21)? Do you trust Him alone for salvation? If your answer to these questions is “yes,” you are saved! Assurance means freedom from doubt. By taking God’s Word to heart, you can have no doubt about the reality of your eternal salvation.


Jesus Himself assures those who believe in Him: “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand” (John 10:28–29). Eternal life is just that—eternal. There is no one, not even yourself, who can take Christ’s God-given gift of salvation away from you.


Take joy in what God’s Word is saying to you: instead of doubting, we can live with confidence! We can have the assurance from Christ’s own Word that our salvation will never be in question. Our assurance of salvation is based on the perfect and complete salvation God has provided for us through Jesus Christ.




“¿Cómo puedo tener la seguridad de mi Salvación?"


Muchos seguidores de Jesucristo buscan la seguridad de la salvación en los lugares equivocados. Tendemos a buscar la seguridad de la salvación en las cosas que Dios está haciendo en nuestras vidas, en nuestro crecimiento espiritual, en las buenas obras y en la obediencia a la Palabra de Dios que es evidente en nuestro caminar cristiano. Aunque estas cosas pueden ser evidencia de la salvación, no son las cosas en las cuales debemos basar la seguridad de nuestra salvación. Más bien, debemos encontrar la seguridad de nuestra salvación en la verdad objetiva de la Palabra de Dios. Debemos tener confianza en que somos salvos basados en las promesas que Dios ha declarado, no por nuestras experiencias subjetivas. 


¿Cómo puedes estar seguro de ser salvo? Considera 1 Juan 5:11-13 “Y este es el testimonio: que Dios nos ha dado vida eterna; y esta vida está en Su Hijo. El que tiene al Hijo, tiene la vida; el que no tiene al Hijo de Dios no tiene la vida. Estas cosas os he escrito a vosotros que creéis en el nombre del Hijo de Dios, para que sepáis que tenéis vida eterna, y para que creáis en el nombre del Hijo de Dios”. ¿Quién es quien tiene al Hijo? Aquellos que han creído en Él y lo han recibido (Juan 1:12). Si tienes a Jesús, tienes la vida. La vida eterna; no temporal, sino eterna. 


Dios quiere que tengamos la seguridad de nuestra salvación. No podemos vivir nuestra vida cristiana dudando y preocupándonos cada día por saber si realmente somos o no salvos. Esto es por lo que la Biblia hace tan claro el plan de salvación. “... cree en el Señor Jesucristo, y serás salvo...” (Juan 3:16; Hechos 16:31). “Si confesares con tu boca que Jesús es el Señor, y creyeres en tu corazón que Dios le levantó de los muertos, serás salvo” (Romanos 10:9). ¿Te has arrepentido de tus pecados? ¿Crees que Jesús es el Salvador, que Él murió para pagar el castigo por tus pecados y resucitó de entre los muertos? (Romanos 5:8; 2 Corintios 5:21). ¿Estás confiando solamente en Él para tu salvación? Si tu respuesta es sí, ¡entonces eres salvo! La seguridad significa “no tener nada de duda”. Al creer la Palabra de Dios de corazón, puedes estar completamente seguro acerca de la realidad de tu eterna salvación. 


Jesús mismo declara esto acerca de aquellos que creen en Él: “Y yo les doy vida eterna; y no perecerán jamás, ni nadie las arrebatará de mi mano. Mi Padre que me las dio, es mayor que todos, y nadie las puede arrebatar de la mano de mi Padre”. (Juan 10:28-29). La vida eterna es justo eso – eterna. No hay nadie, ni siquiera tú mismo, que pueda quitarte este regalo de Dios en Cristo, que es la salvación. 


Gózate en lo que la Palabra de Dios te dice: Al hacer eso en lugar de dudar, ¡podemos vivir con confianza! Podemos tener la seguridad de la propia Palabra de Cristo, de que nuestra salvación nunca estará en duda. Nuestra seguridad de salvación se basa en la salvación perfecta y completa que Dios nos ha dado a través de Jesucristo. 




07/05/20  


"What if I don't feel saved?"


This is an all-too-common question among Christians. Many people doubt their salvation because of feelings or the lack of them. The Bible has much to say about salvation, but nothing to say about “feeling saved.” Salvation is a process by which the sinner is delivered from “wrath,” that is, from God’s judgment against sin (Romans 5:9; 1 Thessalonians 5:9). Specifically, it was Jesus’ death on the cross and subsequent resurrection that achieved our salvation (Romans 5:10; Ephesians 1:7). 


Our part in the salvation process is that we are saved by faith. First, we must hear the gospel—the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection (Ephesians 1:13). Then, we must believe—fully trust the Lord Jesus (Romans 1:16) and His sacrifice alone. We have no confidence in works of the flesh to achieve salvation. This faith—which is a gift from God, not something we produce on our own (Ephesians 2:8-9)—involves repentance, a changing of mind about sin and Christ (Acts 3:19), and calling on the name of the Lord (Romans 10:9-10, 13). Salvation results in a changed life as we begin to live as the new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17). 


We live in a feeling-oriented society and, sadly, that has spilled over into the church. But feelings are unreliable. Emotions are untrustworthy. They ebb and flow like the tides of the sea that bring in all kinds of seaweed and debris and deposit them on the shore, then go back out, eroding the ground we stand on and washing it out to sea. Such is the state of those whose emotions rule their lives. The simplest circumstances—a headache, a cloudy day, a word thoughtlessly spoken by a friend—can erode our confidence and send us “out to sea” in a fit of despair. Doubt and discouragement, particularly about the Christian life, are the inevitable result of trying to interpret our feelings as though they were truth. They are not. 


But the Christian who is forewarned and well armed is a person not governed by feelings but by the truth he knows. He does not rely on his feelings to prove anything to him. Relying on feelings is precisely the error most people make in life. They are so introspective that they become preoccupied with themselves, constantly analyzing their own feelings. They will continually question their relationship with God. “Do I really love God?” “Does He really love me?” “Am I good enough?” What we need to do is stop thinking about ourselves and focusing on our feelings and instead redirect our focus to God and the truth we know about Him from His Word.


When we are controlled by subjective feelings centered on ourselves rather than by objective truth centered on God, we live in a constant state of defeat. Objective truth centers on the great doctrines of the faith and their relevance to life: the sovereignty of God, the high priestly intercession of Christ, the promise of the Holy Spirit, and the hope of eternal glory. Understanding these great truths, centering our thoughts on them, and rehearsing them in our minds will enable us to reason from truth in all of life’s trials, and our faith will be strong and vital. Reasoning from what we feel about ourselves—rather than what we know about God—is the sure path to spiritual defeat. The Christian life is one of death to self and rising to “walk in the newness of life” (Romans 6:4), and that new life is characterized by thoughts about Him who saved us, not thoughts about the feelings of the dead flesh that has been crucified with Christ. When we are continually thinking about ourselves and our feelings, we are essentially obsessing about a corpse, full of rottenness and death.


God promised to save us if we come to Him in faith. He never promised that we would feelsaved.



“¿Qué pasa si no me siento salvado?"

Esta es una pregunta tan-común entre los cristianos. Mucha gente duda de su salvación por los sentimientos o la ausencia de ellos. La Biblia tiene mucho que decir acerca de la salvación, pero nada que decir acerca de “sentirse salvado.” La salvación es un proceso por medio del cual el pecador es librado de la “ira,” esto es, del juicio de Dios contra el pecado (Romanos 5:9; 1 Tesalonicenses 5:9). Específicamente, fue la muerte de Jesús en la cruz, y Su subsecuente resurrección lo que logró nuestra salvación (Romanos 5:10; Efesios 1:7).


Nuestra parte en el proceso de salvación, es que somos salvados por fe. Primero, debemos escuchar el Evangelio – las buenas nuevas de la muerte y resurrección de Cristo (Efesios 1:13). Luego debemos creer – confiar única y totalmente en el Señor Jesucristo (Romanos 1:16) y Su sacrificio. No confiamos en las obras de la carne para alcanzar la salvación. Esta fe – la cual es un don de Dios, no es algo que produzcamos por nosotros mismos (Efesios 2:8-9) – involucra arrepentimiento, un cambio de mentalidad acerca del pecado y Cristo (Hechos 3:19), e invocar el nombre del Señor (Romanos 10:9-10, 13). La salvación resulta en una vida transformada, a medida que comenzamos a vivir como una nueva creación (2 Corintios 5:17). 


Vivimos en una sociedad orientada a las emociones, y lamentablemente, eso se ha extendido a la iglesia. Pero los sentimientos no son confiables. Las emociones no son confiables. Éstas fluyen hacia arriba y hacia abajo, como las mareas en el mar, que arrastran todo tipo de algas marinas y escombros que son depositados en la orilla, para luego volver a salir, erosionando el terreno donde nos encontramos y arrastrándolo nuevamente mar adentro. Tal es el estado de aquellos cuyas emociones gobiernan sus vidas. Las circunstancias más simples – una jaqueca, un día nublado, una palabra irreflexiva dicha por un amigo – pueden erosionar nuestra confianza y llevarnos “mar adentro” en un arrebato de desesperación. La duda y el desánimo, particularmente acerca de la vida cristiana, son el inevitable resultado al tratar de interpretar nuestros sentimientos, como si éstos fueran confiables. No lo son. 


Pero el cristiano que está prevenido y bien armado, es una persona que no se rige por sentimientos, sino por la verdad que conoce. Él no se basa en sus sentimientos para probar nada. Depender de los sentimientos es precisamente el error que la mayoría de la gente comete en la vida. Ellos son tan introspectivos, que se obsesionan con ellos mismos, analizando constantemente sus propios sentimientos. Éstos son aquellos que están continuamente cuestionando su relación con Dios. “¿Realmente amo a Dios?” “¿Realmente Él me ama?” “¿Soy lo suficientemente bueno?” Lo que realmente necesitamos hacer es dejar de pensar en nosotros mismos, de concentrarnos en nuestros sentimientos, y redirigir nuestra atención hacia Dios y la verdad que conocemos acerca de Él por medio de Su Palabra. 


Cuando somos controlados por sentimientos subjetivos centrados en nosotros mismos, en vez de por una verdad objetiva centrada en Dios, vivimos en un constante estado de derrota. La verdad objetiva se centra en las grandes doctrinas de la fe y su relevancia para la vida: la soberanía de Dios, la intercesión de sumo-sacerdote de Cristo, la promesa del Espíritu Santo, y la esperanza de la gloria eterna. Entendiendo estas grandes verdades, centrando nuestros pensamientos en ellas, y repasándolas en nuestra mente, nos permitirá razonar a partir de la verdad, en todas las pruebas de la vida, y nuestra fe será fuerte y vital. Razonando sobre lo que sentimos acerca de nosotros mismos – en vez de lo que sabemos acerca de Dios – es el camino más seguro para la derrota espiritual. La vida cristiana es morir a uno mismo y levantarnos para “andar en una nueva vida” (Romanos 6:4), y esa nueva vida está caracterizada por pensamientos acerca de Aquel que nos salvó, no pensamientos acerca de sentimientos de la carne muerta que ha sido crucificada con Cristo. Cuando estamos pensando continuamente en nosotros mismos y nuestros sentimientos, estamos esencialmente obsesionados acerca de un cadáver, lleno de podredumbre y muerte. 




07/04/20  FACEBOOK 


What is sanctification?


Many Christians refer to a progression of justification, sanctification, and glorification. Justification refers to the fact that believers have been deemed legally righteous. With Christ's death and resurrection, our sin was forgiven and we are now pure before God (2 Corinthians 5:21; Romans 5:1; Romans 6). While we know that our salvation is complete, there are still aspects of our salvation that are being worked out. We are righteous, and we are also becoming righteous. This "becoming righteous" is referred to as sanctification. Sanctification is where our present realities fall in line with our eternal status.


In one sense, the Christian life is all about sanctification. Christ is finishing the good work that He began in us (Philippians 1:6). We are continually learning to follow God's ways and discard our sinful natures (Ephesians 4:22-24; Colossians 3:5-17). Paul wrote to the church in Ephesus, "I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called" (Ephesians 4:1). We have been declared holy and now attempt to live holy lives (Matthew 5:48). As Christians, we are to cooperate with God's work in us. He refines and prunes us (Zechariah 13:9; Malachi 3:2; Isaiah 48:10; 1 Peter 1:7; John 15:2), and sanctification is one name for that work. 


Glorification is our eternal state. The legal reality of our justification and the physical reality of our sanctification now match up. In glorification we are with Christ and made completely perfect (1 John 3:2; Colossians 1:27; Colossians 3:4).


English next page 


¿Qué es la sanctificación según la Biblia?


Muchos Cristianos se refieren a una progresión de justificación, santificación y glorificación. La Justificación se refiere al hecho de que creyentes han sido declarados legalmente justos. Con la muerte de Cristo y su resurrección, nuestros pecados fueron perdonados y ahora somos puros ante Dios (2 Corintios 5:21; Romanos 5:1; Romanos 6). Mientras sabemos que nuestra salvación está completa, siguen partes de nuestra salvación que se están ajustando. Somos justos y también nos estamos volviendo justos. Esto de “volviéndonos justos” se refiere a la santificación. La santificación es donde nuestras realidades actuales se ordenan con nuestro estatus eterno. 


De una manera, la vida Cristiana se trata toda de la santificación. Cristo está terminando el trabajo que empezó dentro de nosotros (Filipenses 1:6). Estamos continuamente aprendiendo a seguir los caminos de Dios y deshacernos de nuestra naturaleza pecaminosa (Efesios 4:22-24; Colosenses 3:5-17). Pablo le escribió a la iglesia en Éfeso, “Por eso yo, que estoy preso por la causa del Señor, les ruego que vivan de una manera digna del llamamiento que han recibido” (Efesios 4:1). Hemos sido declarados santos y ahora intentamos vivir vidas santas (Mateo 5:48). Como Cristianos, debemos cooperar con el trabajo de Dios dentro de nosotros. Nos refina y nos poda (Zacarías 13:9; Malaquías 3:2; Isaías 48:10; 1 Pedro 1:7; Juan 15:2), y la santificación es el nombre de ese trabajo. 


La glorificación es nuestro estado eterno. La realidad legal de nuestra justificación y la realidad física de nuestra santificación se están alineando. En la glorificación, estamos con Cristo y estamos hechos completamente perfectos (1 Juan 3:2; Colosenses 1:27; Colosenses 3:4). 




07/03/20  


Why are Christians encouraged to have daily devotions or quiet times?


Daily devotions or quiet times are time spent each day dedicated to relating with God. When people speak of daily devotions, they are usually referring to a time of reading their Bible, doing a Bible study, or reading a devotional book, accompanied by a time of prayer. Some may simply pray. Some also include musical worship. No matter the format of a daily devotional time, it is important. 


God desires relationship with us. He created us and has redeemed us for this very purpose. Jesus, prior to His crucifixion, prayed, "Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world" (John 17:24). First John 4:8 tells us that God is love. The love of God is sometimes described as that of a father and child or of a married couple. These relationships are intimate. Intimacy takes time to build. We spend time – daily if possible – with those we love. This time is meant to further our knowledge of one another as well as give us enjoyment. 


Scripture also describes God as our master. Servants (or employees) must spend time with their employers in order to know the employer's will. When we spend daily devotional time with God, we submit our will to His. It is in that time that we surrender our lives to God. We surrender not just the overall trajectory of our lives, but each day. God is in the details of our lives (Matthew 6:25-33). He cares about the details of each day with the love of a father or spouse and also with the interest of a master. We seek to further God's kingdom. Coming to Him each day is one way to know which direction to move. 


Daily devotions help us learn truth. When we spend time in God's Word, we gain wisdom and understanding. It has been said that the best way to recognize a counterfeit is to study the real thing. Satan is the "father of lies" (John 8:44). If we are not steeped in God's truth, we are more easily duped. When we know the truth, we experience freedom (John 8:32).


Daily spending time with God is a way to worship Him. Time is a limited resource. What we spend our time on is an indication of what we value. When we spend time with God, we demonstrate that we value Him. We claim that He is worthy of attention and of praise.


God is our refuge (Psalm 46). Life is often chaotic and confusing. When it is, we run to God. If we desire to truly find rest and safety in God, it is helpful to know Him well. Such deep knowledge comes from daily time spent with Him. Sometimes the best way to use a refuge is to go there before things get messy. 


Daily devotions is a spiritual discipline that helps us get to know God, that ensures we stay connected to Him (John 15:1-8), that teaches us truth, that provides a place for worship, and that functions as a daily shelter in the midst of the storms of life



¿Por qué se alienta a los cristianos a tener un devocional diario o tiempo personal con Dios?




Un devocional diario o tiempo personal con Dios es el tiempo dedicado a relacionarse con Dios todos los días. Cuando las personas hablan del devocional diario, generalmente se refieren a un momento en que leen su Biblia, hacen un estudio bíblico o leen un libro devocional, acompañado de un tiempo de oración. Algunos simplemente oran. Algunos también incluyen un culto musical. Sin importar el formato de un tiempo devocional diario, este es importante. Dios desea una relación con nosotros. Él nos creó y nos redimió para este mismo propósito. Jesús, antes de su crucifixión, oró: "Padre, quiero que los que me has dado estén conmigo donde yo estoy. Que vean mi gloria, la gloria que me has dado porque me amaste desde antes de la creación del mundo."(Juan 17:24) Primera de Juan 4: 8 nos dice que Dios es amor. El amor de Dios a veces se describe como el de un padre y un hijo o de una pareja casada. Estas relaciones son íntimas. La intimidad toma tiempo para construir. Pasamos tiempo, a diario, si es posible, con los que amamos. Este tiempo está destinado a aumentar nuestro conocimiento el uno del otro, así como a darnos gozo. 


La Escritura también describe a Dios como nuestro dueño. Los servidores (o empleados) deben pasar tiempo con sus empleadores para conocer la voluntad del empleador. Cuando pasamos un tiempo devocional diario con Dios, sometemos nuestra voluntad a la suya. Es en ese momento que rendimos nuestras vidas a Dios. Nos rendimos no solo por la trayectoria general de nuestras vidas, sino cada día. Dios está en los detalles de nuestras vidas (Mateo 6: 25-33). Se preocupa por los detalles de cada día con el amor de un padre o cónyuge y también con el interés de un maestro. Buscamos promover el reino de Dios. Venir a Él todos los días es una forma de saber qué dirección seguir. 


Las devociones diarias nos ayudan a aprender la verdad. Cuando pasamos tiempo en la Palabra de Dios, obtenemos sabiduría y comprensión. Se ha dicho que la mejor manera de reconocer una falsificación es estudiar el objeto real. Satanás es el "padre de las mentiras" (Juan 8:44). Si no estamos empapados en la verdad de Dios, somos más fácilmente engañados. Cuando conocemos la verdad, experimentamos la libertad (Juan 8:32). 


Pasar tiempo todos los días con Dios es una forma de adorarlo. El tiempo es un recurso limitado. En lo que pasamos nuestro tiempo es una indicación de lo que valoramos. Cuando pasamos tiempo con Dios, demostramos que lo valoramos. Afirmamos que Él es digno de atención y de alabanza. 


Dios es nuestro refugio (Salmo 46). La vida es a menudo caótica y confusa. Cuando es así, corremos hacia Dios. Si deseamos encontrar verdaderamente descanso y seguridad en Dios, es útil conocerlo bien. Tal conocimiento profundo proviene del tiempo diario pasado con Él. A veces, la mejor manera de usar un refugio es ir allí antes de que las cosas se compliquen. 


La devoción diaria es una disciplina espiritual que nos ayuda a conocer a Dios, que nos asegura que estamos conectados con Él (Juan 15: 1-8), que nos enseña la verdad, que proporciona un lugar para la adoración, y que funciona como un refugio diario en medio de las tormentas de la vida. 




07/01/20

“What does it mean to be free from sin?"


Proverbs 20:9 asks the question "Who can say, 'I have cleansed my heart; I am pure and free from sin'?" (NLT). We can all identify with that. If we are honest with ourselves, we know we still sin. So why does Romans 6:18 say, "You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness"? Is this a contradiction?


Sin can be defined as "any thought, action, or attitude that falls short of God's holiness" (Romans 3:23). Sin has many layers. There are specific actions or thoughts which are sinful. Murder, adultery, and theft are sins (Exodus 20:1–17). Even the desire to commit murder, adultery, and theft are sins (Matthew 5:21, 28). But sin goes deeper than that. We commit sins because we are sinners. Since Adam first sinned in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:17; 3:17–19), every person born has inherited a sin nature from him (Psalm 51:5; Romans 3:23; 5:12). We cannot help but sin because it is our nature to do so. A bird does not have to be taught how to build a nest and keep her eggs warm. It is her nature to do so. A child does not have to be taught to be selfish and demanding. That comes naturally.


However, we were not created to be sinful. We were designed by God in His own image (Genesis 1:27). Humanity is His masterpiece (Ephesians 2:10; Psalm 8:4–6). We were designed to live in fellowship with our Creator. But because of sin, we cannot enter His presence (Habakkuk 1:13). When Jesus died on the cross, He took upon Himself all the sin of the world (2 Corinthians 5:21; 1 John 2:2). By taking the punishment for our sin, He cancelled the debt that each of us owes God (Colossians 2:14). He also reversed the curse of our old natures, which keeps us enslaved to sinful passions and desires (Galatians 3:10, 13). Before a person meets Christ, he or she is enslaved by that sin nature (Romans 7:25; 2 Peter 2:19). At the moment of conversion, we are given a new nature that has been freed from sin (Romans 6:18; 8:2). The entire chapter of Romans 6 explains this in detail. Verse 14 says, "For sin shall no longer be your master, because you are not under the law, but under grace."


To be free from sin means that those who have made Jesus the Lord of their lives are no longer enslaved by sin. We have the power, through the Holy Spirit, to live victoriously over sin (1 Corinthians 15:56–67; Romans 8:37). Just like we once followed fleshly desires, those who are "in Christ Jesus" now follow the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:24). Because we live in a fallen world and are still fleshly creatures, we will still sin (1 John 1:9; 2:1; Romans 7:21–22). But those who follow Christ do not make sin a lifestyle choice (1 John 2:1–6; 3:6–10; Romans 6:2).


Those who have been born again (John 3:3) have received a new nature. Whereas the old nature drew us toward self-pleasure, the new nature tugs us toward holiness (2 Corinthians 5:17). To be free from sin means it no longer wields the power it once did. The stranglehold of selfishness, greed, and lust has been broken. Freedom from sin allows us to offer ourselves as willing slaves of the Lord Jesus Christ, who continues to work in us to make us more like Him (Romans 6:18; 8:29; Philippians 2:13).



"¿Qué significa ser libre del pecado?"


Proverbios 20: 9 hace la pregunta "¿Quién puede decir:" He limpiado mi corazón; soy puro y libre de pecado "? 


Todos podemos identificarnos con eso. Si somos honestos con nosotros mismos, sabemos que todavía pecamos. Entonces, ¿por qué Romanos 6:18 dice: "Han sido liberados del pecado y se han convertido en esclavos de la justicia"? ¿Es esto una contradicción? 


 El pecado se puede definir como "cualquier pensamiento, acción o actitud que no alcanza la santidad de Dios" (Romanos 3:23). El pecado tiene muchas capas. Hay acciones o pensamientos específicos que son pecaminosos. El asesinato, el adulterio y el robo son pecados (Éxodo 20: 1–17). Incluso el deseo de cometer asesinato, adulterio y robo son pecados (Mateo 5:21, 28). Pero el pecado va más profundo que eso. 


Cometemos pecados porque somos pecadores. Desde que Adán pecó por primera vez en el Jardín del Edén (Génesis 2:17; 3: 17–19), toda persona nacida ha heredado de él una naturaleza pecaminosa (Salmo 51: 5; Romanos 3:23; 5:12). 


No podemos evitar pecar porque nuestra naturaleza es hacerlo. No es necesario enseñarle a un pájaro cómo construir un nido y mantener sus huevos calientes. Es su naturaleza hacerlo. Un niño no tiene que ser enseñado a ser egoísta y exigente. Eso viene naturalmente.


Sin embargo, no fuimos creados para ser pecaminosos. Fuimos diseñados por Dios a su propia imagen (Génesis 1:27). 


La humanidad es su obra maestra (Efesios 2:10; Salmo 8: 4–6). Fuimos diseñados para vivir en comunión con nuestro Creador. Pero debido al pecado, no podemos entrar en su presencia (Habacuc 1:13). Cuando Jesús murió en la cruz, tomó sobre sí todo el pecado del mundo (2 Corintios 5:21; 1 Juan 2: 2). Al tomar el castigo por nuestro pecado, canceló la deuda que cada uno de nosotros le debemos a Dios (Colosenses 2:14). 


También revirtió la maldición de nuestras viejas naturalezas, lo que nos mantiene esclavos de pasiones y deseos pecaminosos (Gálatas 3:10, 13). 


Antes de que una persona se encuentre con Cristo, él o ella están esclavizados por esa naturaleza pecaminosa (Romanos 7:25; 2 Pedro 2:19). En el momento de la conversión, se nos da una nueva naturaleza que ha sido liberada del pecado (Romanos 6:18; 8: 2). Todo el capítulo de Romanos 6 explica esto en detalle. El versículo 14 dice: "Porque el pecado ya no será tu señor, porque no estás bajo la ley, sino bajo la gracia". 


 Estar libre del pecado significa que aquellos que han hecho de Jesús el Señor de sus vidas ya no están esclavizados por el pecado. Tenemos el poder, por medio del Espíritu Santo, para vivir victoriosamente sobre el pecado (1 Corintios 15: 56–67; Romanos 8:37). Al igual que una vez seguimos los deseos carnales, los que están "en Cristo Jesús" ahora siguen al Espíritu Santo (Romanos 8:14; Gálatas 5:24). Debido a que vivimos en un mundo caído y todavía somos criaturas carnales, todavía pecaremos (1 Juan 1: 9; 2: 1; Romanos 7: 21–22). Pero aquellos que siguen a Cristo no hacen del pecado una opción de estilo de vida (1 Juan 2: 1–6; 3: 6–10; Romanos 6: 2). 


 Los que han nacido de nuevo (Juan 3: 3) han recibido una nueva naturaleza. Mientras que la vieja naturaleza nos atrajo hacia el placer propio, la nueva naturaleza nos arrastra hacia la santidad (2 Corintios 5:17). 


Estar libre del pecado significa que ya no ejerce el poder que una vez tuvo. El dominio del egoísmo, la codicia y la lujuria se ha roto. La libertad del pecado nos permite ofrecernos como esclavos voluntarios del Señor Jesucristo, quien continúa trabajando en nosotros para hacernos más como Él (Romanos 6:18; 8:29; Filipenses 2:13).




06/30/20  


“What does it mean to be free from sin?"


Proverbs 20:9 asks the question "Who can say, 'I have cleansed my heart; I am pure and free from sin'?" (NLT). We can all identify with that. If we are honest with ourselves, we know we still sin. So why does Romans 6:18 say, "You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness"? Is this a contradiction?


Sin can be defined as "any thought, action, or attitude that falls short of God's holiness" (Romans 3:23). Sin has many layers. There are specific actions or thoughts which are sinful. Murder, adultery, and theft are sins (Exodus 20:1–17). Even the desire to commit murder, adultery, and theft are sins (Matthew 5:21, 28). But sin goes deeper than that. We commit sins because we are sinners. Since Adam first sinned in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:17; 3:17–19), every person born has inherited a sin nature from him (Psalm 51:5; Romans 3:23; 5:12). We cannot help but sin because it is our nature to do so. A bird does not have to be taught how to build a nest and keep her eggs warm. It is her nature to do so. A child does not have to be taught to be selfish and demanding. That comes naturally.


However, we were not created to be sinful. We were designed by God in His own image (Genesis 1:27). Humanity is His masterpiece (Ephesians 2:10; Psalm 8:4–6). We were designed to live in fellowship with our Creator. But because of sin, we cannot enter His presence (Habakkuk 1:13). When Jesus died on the cross, He took upon Himself all the sin of the world (2 Corinthians 5:21; 1 John 2:2). By taking the punishment for our sin, He cancelled the debt that each of us owes God (Colossians 2:14). He also reversed the curse of our old natures, which keeps us enslaved to sinful passions and desires (Galatians 3:10, 13). Before a person meets Christ, he or she is enslaved by that sin nature (Romans 7:25; 2 Peter 2:19). At the moment of conversion, we are given a new nature that has been freed from sin (Romans 6:18; 8:2). The entire chapter of Romans 6 explains this in detail. Verse 14 says, "For sin shall no longer be your master, because you are not under the law, but under grace."


To be free from sin means that those who have made Jesus the Lord of their lives are no longer enslaved by sin. We have the power, through the Holy Spirit, to live victoriously over sin (1 Corinthians 15:56–67; Romans 8:37). Just like we once followed fleshly desires, those who are "in Christ Jesus" now follow the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:24). Because we live in a fallen world and are still fleshly creatures, we will still sin (1 John 1:9; 2:1; Romans 7:21–22). But those who follow Christ do not make sin a lifestyle choice (1 John 2:1–6; 3:6–10; Romans 6:2).


Those who have been born again (John 3:3) have received a new nature. Whereas the old nature drew us toward self-pleasure, the new nature tugs us toward holiness (2 Corinthians 5:17). To be free from sin means it no longer wields the power it once did. The stranglehold of selfishness, greed, and lust has been broken. Freedom from sin allows us to offer ourselves as willing slaves of the Lord Jesus Christ, who continues to work in us to make us more like Him (Romans 6:18; 8:29; Philippians 2:13).



"¿Qué significa ser libre del pecado?"


Proverbios 20: 9 hace la pregunta "¿Quién puede decir:" He limpiado mi corazón; soy puro y libre de pecado "? 


Todos podemos identificarnos con eso. Si somos honestos con nosotros mismos, sabemos que todavía pecamos. Entonces, ¿por qué Romanos 6:18 dice: "Han sido liberados del pecado y se han convertido en esclavos de la justicia"? ¿Es esto una contradicción? 


 El pecado se puede definir como "cualquier pensamiento, acción o actitud que no alcanza la santidad de Dios" (Romanos 3:23). El pecado tiene muchas capas. Hay acciones o pensamientos específicos que son pecaminosos. El asesinato, el adulterio y el robo son pecados (Éxodo 20: 1–17). Incluso el deseo de cometer asesinato, adulterio y robo son pecados (Mateo 5:21, 28). Pero el pecado va más profundo que eso. 


Cometemos pecados porque somos pecadores. Desde que Adán pecó por primera vez en el Jardín del Edén (Génesis 2:17; 3: 17–19), toda persona nacida ha heredado de él una naturaleza pecaminosa (Salmo 51: 5; Romanos 3:23; 5:12). 


No podemos evitar pecar porque nuestra naturaleza es hacerlo. No es necesario enseñarle a un pájaro cómo construir un nido y mantener sus huevos calientes. Es su naturaleza hacerlo. Un niño no tiene que ser enseñado a ser egoísta y exigente. Eso viene naturalmente.


Sin embargo, no fuimos creados para ser pecaminosos. Fuimos diseñados por Dios a su propia imagen (Génesis 1:27). 


La humanidad es su obra maestra (Efesios 2:10; Salmo 8: 4–6). Fuimos diseñados para vivir en comunión con nuestro Creador. Pero debido al pecado, no podemos entrar en su presencia (Habacuc 1:13). Cuando Jesús murió en la cruz, tomó sobre sí todo el pecado del mundo (2 Corintios 5:21; 1 Juan 2: 2). Al tomar el castigo por nuestro pecado, canceló la deuda que cada uno de nosotros le debemos a Dios (Colosenses 2:14). 


También revirtió la maldición de nuestras viejas naturalezas, lo que nos mantiene esclavos de pasiones y deseos pecaminosos (Gálatas 3:10, 13). 


Antes de que una persona se encuentre con Cristo, él o ella están esclavizados por esa naturaleza pecaminosa (Romanos 7:25; 2 Pedro 2:19). En el momento de la conversión, se nos da una nueva naturaleza que ha sido liberada del pecado (Romanos 6:18; 8: 2). Todo el capítulo de Romanos 6 explica esto en detalle. El versículo 14 dice: "Porque el pecado ya no será tu señor, porque no estás bajo la ley, sino bajo la gracia". 


 Estar libre del pecado significa que aquellos que han hecho de Jesús el Señor de sus vidas ya no están esclavizados por el pecado. Tenemos el poder, por medio del Espíritu Santo, para vivir victoriosamente sobre el pecado (1 Corintios 15: 56–67; Romanos 8:37). Al igual que una vez seguimos los deseos carnales, los que están "en Cristo Jesús" ahora siguen al Espíritu Santo (Romanos 8:14; Gálatas 5:24). Debido a que vivimos en un mundo caído y todavía somos criaturas carnales, todavía pecaremos (1 Juan 1: 9; 2: 1; Romanos 7: 21–22). Pero aquellos que siguen a Cristo no hacen del pecado una opción de estilo de vida (1 Juan 2: 1–6; 3: 6–10; Romanos 6: 2). 


 Los que han nacido de nuevo (Juan 3: 3) han recibido una nueva naturaleza. Mientras que la vieja naturaleza nos atrajo hacia el placer propio, la nueva naturaleza nos arrastra hacia la santidad (2 Corintios 5:17). 


Estar libre del pecado significa que ya no ejerce el poder que una vez tuvo. El dominio del egoísmo, la codicia y la lujuria se ha roto. La libertad del pecado nos permite ofrecernos como esclavos voluntarios del Señor Jesucristo, quien continúa trabajando en nosotros para hacernos más como Él (Romanos 6:18; 8:29; Filipenses 2:13).




06/29/20  


“What does the Bible say about Christian character?"


Character is defined as strength of moral fiber. A.W. Tozer described character as “the excellence of moral beings.” As the excellence of gold is its purity and the excellence of art is its beauty, so the excellence of man is his character. Persons of character are noted for their honesty, ethics, and charity. Descriptions such as “man of principle” and “woman of integrity” are assertions of character. A lack of character is moral deficiency, and persons lacking character tend to behave dishonestly, unethically, and uncharitably. 


A person’s character is the sum of his or her disposition, thoughts, intentions, desires, and actions. It is good to remember that character is gauged by general tendencies, not on the basis of a few isolated actions. We must look at the whole life. For example, King David was a man of good character (1 Samuel 13:14) although he sinned on occasion (2 Samuel 11). And although King Ahab may have acted nobly once (1 Kings 22:35), he was still a man of overall bad character (1 Kings 16:33). Several people in the Bible are described as having noble character: Ruth (Ruth 3:11), Hanani (Nehemiah 7:2), David (Psalm 78:72), and Job (Job 2:3). These individuals’ lives were distinguished by persistent moral virtue.


Character is influenced and developed by our choices. Daniel “resolved not to defile himself” in Babylon (Daniel 1:8), and that godly choice was an important step in formulating an unassailable integrity in the young man’s life. Character, in turn, influences our choices. “The integrity of the upright guides them” (Proverbs 11:3a). Character will help us weather the storms of life and keep us from sin (Proverbs 10:9a). 


It is the Lord’s purpose to develop character within us. “The crucible for silver and the furnace for gold, but the LORD tests the heart” (Proverbs 17:3). Godly character is the result of the Holy Spirit’s work of sanctification. Character in the believer is a consistent manifestation of Jesus in his life. It is the purity of heart that God gives becoming purity in action. God sometimes uses trials to strengthen character: “we also rejoice in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope” (Romans 5:3-4). The Lord is pleased when His children grow in character. “You test the heart and are pleased with integrity” (1 Chronicles 29:17; see also Psalm 15:1-2).


We can develop character by controlling our thoughts (Philippians 4:8), practicing Christian virtues (2 Peter 1:5-6), guarding our hearts (Proverbs 4:23; Matthew 15:18-20), and keeping good company (1 Corinthians 15:33). Men and women of character will set a good example for others to follow, and their godly reputation will be evident to all (Titus 2:7-8).




"¿Qué dice la Biblia sobre el carácter cristiano?"


El carácter se define como la fuerza de la fibra moral. A.W. Tozer describió al personaje como "la excelencia de los seres morales". Como la excelencia del oro es su pureza y la excelencia del arte es su belleza, la excelencia del hombre es su carácter. Las personas de carácter se caracterizan por su honestidad, ética y caridad. Las descripciones como "hombre de principio" y "mujer de integridad" son afirmaciones de carácter. La falta de carácter es una deficiencia moral, y las personas que carecen de carácter tienden a comportarse de manera deshonesta, poco ética y poco caritativa. 


El carácter de una persona es la suma de su disposición, pensamientos, intenciones, deseos y acciones. Es bueno recordar que el carácter se mide por tendencias generales, no en base a algunas acciones aisladas. Debemos mirar toda la vida. Por ejemplo, el rey David era un hombre de buen carácter (1 Samuel 13:14) aunque en ocasiones pecó (2 Samuel 11). 


Y aunque el Rey Acab pudo haber actuado noble una vez (1 Reyes 22:35), todavía era un hombre de mal carácter en general (1 Reyes 16:33). Se describe que varias personas en la Biblia tienen un carácter noble: Rut (Rut 3:11), Hanani (Nehemías 7: 2), David (Salmo 78:72) y Job (Job 2: 3). La vida de estos individuos se distinguió por la persistente virtud moral. 


El carácter está influenciado y desarrollado por nuestras elecciones. Daniel "resolvió no contaminarse" en Babilonia (Daniel 1: 8), y esa elección piadosa fue un paso importante para formular una integridad inexpugnable en la vida del joven. 


El carácter, a su vez, influye en nuestras elecciones. "La integridad de los rectos los guía" (Proverbios 11: 3a). El carácter nos ayudará a capear las tormentas de la vida y nos protegerá del pecado (Proverbios 10: 9a).


El propósito del Señor es desarrollar el carácter dentro de nosotros. “El crisol para plata y el horno para oro, pero el SEÑOR prueba el corazón” (Proverbios 17: 3). El carácter piadoso es el resultado de la obra de santificación del Espíritu Santo. El carácter en el creyente es una manifestación constante de Jesús en su vida. 


Es la pureza de corazón que Dios da a la pureza en acción. Dios a veces usa pruebas para fortalecer el carácter: “también nos regocijamos en nuestros sufrimientos, porque sabemos que el sufrimiento produce perseverancia; perseverancia, carácter; y carácter, esperanza ”(Romanos 5: 3-4). El Señor se complace cuando sus hijos crecen en carácter. “Pruebas el corazón y estás satisfecho con la integridad” (1 Crónicas 29:17; ver también Salmo 15: 1-2). 


Podemos desarrollar el carácter controlando nuestros pensamientos (Filipenses 4: 8), practicando las virtudes cristianas (2 Pedro 1: 5-6), cuidando nuestros corazones (Proverbios 4:23; Mateo 15: 18-20) y manteniendo una buena compañía ( 1 Corintios 15:33). Los hombres y mujeres con carácter darán un buen ejemplo a los demás, y su reputación piadosa será evidente para todos (Tito 2: 7-8).




06/28/20  


“How can I become more like Christ?"


God's desire for all who know Him is for us to become more like Christ. We do this by first growing in our knowledge of Christ. It stands to reason that we cannot grow to be like someone we don't know. The deeper our knowledge of Christ, the deeper our understanding of Him, and the more like Him we become. Among other reasons, we are to know and understand Christ so that we will be secure in the faith.


The Apostle Paul reiterates this truth in Ephesians 4:14-16: "Then we will no longer be infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and craftiness of men in their deceitful scheming. Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into him who is the Head, that is, Christ. From him the whole body, joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work." This fact is repeated once more in 2 Peter 3:17-18: "Therefore, dear friends, since you already know this, be on your guard so that you may not be carried away by the error of lawless men and fall from your secure position. But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and forever! Amen." These passages show us that growing in the knowledge of Christ will preserve us from faith-destroying error.


Of course, knowledge alone will not produce a Christlike character. The knowledge we gain from God's Word must impact our hearts and convict us of the need to obey what we have learned. Romans 12:1-2 tells us emphatically that the process of filling our minds with the knowledge of God not only brings us closer to Christlikeness, but obedience to that knowledge aligns us with the perfect will of God: "Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God's mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God"this is your spiritual act of worship. Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God's will is"his good, pleasing and perfect will."


The natural consequence of knowing and obeying God is that He becomes greater and greater, while we become less and less as we yield control of our lives to Him. Just as John the Baptist knew that "[Jesus] must increase, but I must decrease" (John 3:30), so the Christian grows to reflect more of Christ and less of his own nature. Luke sums it up best when he describes what Jesus told His disciples: "If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will save it" (Luke 9:23-24). The cross was an instrument of death, and Jesus encourages us to take up our cross in order to put to death our old sin nature upon it. God wants us to forget about this world and all its temporary pleasures and be obedient to His Word. Jesus is the living Word (John 1:1), and the Bible is God's written Word. Therefore, conforming to the Word of God is conforming to Christ.


It is important to realize that becoming more like Christ starts by receiving Him as Savior from our sins. Then we grow in our knowledge of God by reading the Bible daily, studying it, and being obedient to what it says. This process causes us to grow and occurs over an entire lifetime in Christ. Only when we have entered Heaven for eternity with God does this process reach its culmination.



"¿Cómo puedo ser más semejante a Cristo?"

Ser cada vez más semejante a Cristo es el deseo de cada creyente, y es alentador saber que Dios tiene el mismo deseo para nosotros. De hecho, la Biblia dice que Dios "predestinó [los creyentes] para que fuesen hechos conformes a la imagen de su Hijo." (Romanos 8:29). Haciéndonos semejantes a Cristo es la obra de Dios, y lo verá cumplirse hasta el final (Filipenses 1:6).


Sin embargo, el hecho de que Dios nos transforme en semejanza a Cristo no significa que podamos sentarnos y ser llevados al cielo "en camas florecientes de facilidad." El proceso exige nuestra cooperación voluntaria con el Espíritu Santo. Llegar a ser más como Cristo requiere tanto el poder divino como el cumplimiento de las responsabilidades humanas.


Hay tres cosas que contribuyen a ser más como Cristo: nuestra entrega a Dios, nuestra libertad del pecado y nuestro crecimiento espiritual.


1) Ser cada vez más semejantes a Cristo es el resultado de la entrega a Dios. Romanos 12:1-2 dice que nuestro culto racional implica una auto dedicación total a Dios. Ofrecemos nuestros cuerpos como "sacrificios vivos", y nuestras mentes son renovadas y transformadas.


Cuando Jesús dijo: "Sígueme", Leví dejó inmediatamente sus mesas de dinero (Marcos 2:14); así todos rendimos voluntariamente todo lo que tenemos a fin de seguir al Señor. Como dijo Juan el Bautista, "Es necesario que él crezca, pero que yo mengüe."(Juan 3:30), por lo que nos enfocamos más y más sobre Jesús y Su gloria, perdiéndonos en Su voluntad.


2) Ser cada vez más semejantes a Cristo es el resultado de la libertad del pecado. Puesto que Jesús vivió una vida sin pecado, cuanto más nos consideramos "muertos al pecado" (Romanos 6:11) y vivimos una vida de pureza, más como Jesús seremos. Al ofrecernos a Dios, el pecado ya no es nuestro maestro, y nosotros estamos más claramente identificados con Cristo (Romanos 6:1-14).


Jesús nos invita a seguirlo, y tenemos Su ejemplo de obediencia (Juan 15:10), amor sacrificial (Juan 15:12-13) y sufrimiento paciente (1 Pedro 2:19-23). También tenemos el ejemplo de los apóstoles, quienes modelaron a Cristo (1 Corintios 11:1).


Cuando se trata de restringir el pecado en nuestras vidas, tenemos la ayuda divina: Alabado sea el Señor por la Palabra de Dios (Salmo 119:11), la intercesión de Cristo (Romanos 8:34; Hebreos 7:25) y el poder del Espíritu quien mora en nosotros (Romanos 8:4; Gálatas 5:16).


3) Ser cada vez más semejantes a Cristo es el resultado del crecimiento cristiano. Cuando primero somos salvos, somos inmaduros en la sabiduría y el conocimiento, e inexpertos en la gracia y el amor. Pero luego crecemos. En cada una de estas cosas, nuestra responsabilidad es llegar a ser más fuertes y más como Cristo. "Creced en la gracia y el conocimiento de nuestro Señor y Salvador Jesucristo." (2 Pedro 3:18). "Y el Señor os haga crecer y abundar en amor unos para con otros y para con todos…" (1 Tesalonicenses 3:12).


Ahora mismo, Dios trabaja en nosotros: "Por tanto, nosotros todos, mirando a cara descubierta como en un espejo la gloria del Señor, somos transformados de gloria en gloria en la misma imagen, como por el Espíritu del Señor.” (2 Corintios 3:18). Un día, sin embargo, el proceso será completo: "cuando él se manifieste, seremos semejantes a él, porque le veremos tal como él es. " (1 Juan 3:2). La promesa de ser plenamente semejantes a Cristo en el futuro es en sí misma una motivación para llegar a ser más como Cristo ahora: "Y todo aquel que tiene esta esperanza en él, se purifica a sí mismo, así como él es puro." (1 Juan 3:3). 




06/27/20  


“What is the key to truly experiencing God?"


Although extremely popular in Christian circles, the concept of “experiencing God” is not explicitly found in Scripture. There are numerous commands in Scripture regarding how we are to relate to God, but experiencing Him is not one of them. We are to love God with all our hearts (Deuteronomy 6:5), obey God (Deuteronomy 27:10; 1 John 5:2), trust God (John 14:1), fear God (Ecclesiastes 12:13; 1 Peter 2:17), etc. But nowhere does the Bible tell us to “experience God.” The dictionary definition of experience as a verb is “1) to participate in or undergo, 2) to be emotionally or aesthetically moved by, or 3) to learn by experience.”


What, then is meant by experiencing God, and how do we go about it? If we begin with the dictionary definitions of experience, put them together, and apply them to our relationship to God, we come up with something like “participating in the nature of God, being moved by Him, and learning of Him by familiarity.”


Before we can participate in God in any way, we have to fully come to terms with two inner conflicts. First, each of us is a hopeless sinner in a pit from which we cannot escape by our own efforts (Romans 3:12). Second, nothing we do on our own is acceptable to Almighty God—not giving our money to the poor, not volunteer work at the hospital, not church attendance, nothing (Isaiah 64:6). Scripture tells us that, in order to resolve these conflicts, we have to receive Jesus Christ in our heart as our Lord and Savior and turn our lives over to Him. Only then are our words and acts acceptable to God (2 Corinthians 12:9–10). So the first key to experiencing God is to be a “partaker of the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4), and that is done only through faith in the shed blood of Christ on the cross for our sin.


The second part of our definition of experiencing God is being moved by Him. The movement of God in the soul of man is one function of the Holy Spirit. From the very beginning of creation, when the Spirit of God “moved on the face of the waters” (Genesis 1:2), to the movement of the Spirit in the hearts of unbelievers, drawing them to Christ, the Spirit is actively involved in moving us. We are moved by God in His drawing us to faith (John 6:44); the Spirit moves in our hearts to convict us of sin and our need for the Savior (John 16:7–9), and within believers, He directs, guides, comforts, and influences us, as well as produces in us the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22–23). In addition, the Spirit moved the authors of all 66 books of the Bible to record exactly what He breathed into their hearts and minds (2 Peter 1:21), and through the Scriptures, He moves within us to testify to our spirits that we are His children (Romans 8:16).


The third part of experiencing God is the lifelong process of learning of Him, becoming so intimately acquainted with Him that we joyfully yield our lives to Him because we have come to know Him and trust Him completely. This involves coming to understand that He is faithful, good, holy, just, unchanging, omnipotent, and sovereign over all circumstances. One very joyous part of experiencing God is the intimate knowledge of His love. The Bible tells us that “God is love” (1 John 4:8, emphasis added). As we experience His love, we can begin to share our Christian love with others, regardless of circumstances, and this in turn will produce more and more love as others experience His love through us.


The key to experiencing God, then, is not expecting an “experience” or an emotional lift. Rather, it is a lifelong process of belonging to Him through Christ, being moved by the Holy Spirit by whom we are sanctified, and growing in the knowledge of Him.




“¿Cuál es la clave para experimentar verdaderamente a Dios?"

Aunque es extremadamente popular en círculos cristianos, el concepto de "experimentar a Dios" no se encuentra claramente en las escrituras. Hay muchísimos mandatos en las escrituras acerca de cómo nos relacionamos con Dios, sin embargo el experimentar a Dios no es uno de ellos. Debemos amar a Dios con todo nuestro corazón (Deuteronomio 6:5), obedecer a Dios (Deuteronomio 27:10; 1 Juan 5:2), confiar en Dios (Juan 14:1), tener temor a Dios (Eclesiastés 12:13; 1 Pedro 2:17), etc. En ninguna parte la biblia nos dice que "experimentemos a Dios". La definición que encontramos en el diccionario del verbo experimentar es "1) participar en o someterse a, 2) estar emocionalmente o estéticamente movido por, o 3) aprender por la experiencia".


¿Qué se entiende entonces por experimentar a Dios, y cómo vamos a hacerlo? Si comenzamos con las definiciones del diccionario de la palabra experimentar, colocándolas juntas y aplicándolas a nuestra relación con Dios, nos encontramos con algo como "participando en la naturaleza de Dios, siendo movidos por él, y aprendiendo de él por la familiaridad".


Antes de que podamos participar en Dios en cualquier manera, tenemos que llegar a un acuerdo completo con dos conflictos interiores. En primer lugar, cada uno de nosotros es un pecador desesperado en un pozo del que no podemos escapar por nuestros propios esfuerzos (Romanos 3:12). En segundo lugar, nada de lo que hagamos por nuestra propia cuenta es aceptable para el Dios todopoderoso, ni siquiera el dar nuestro dinero a los pobres, ni el trabajo voluntario, ni la asistencia a la iglesia, nada en absoluto (Isaías 64:6). Las escrituras nos dicen que, para resolver estos conflictos, tenemos que recibir a Jesucristo en nuestro corazón como nuestro señor y salvador y entregarle nuestras vidas. Solo en ese momento nuestras palabras y nuestros actos son aceptables a Dios (2 Corintios 12:9-10). Entonces, la primera clave para experimentar a Dios es ser "partícipe de la naturaleza divina" (2 Pedro 1:4), y eso sólo se hace por medio de la fe en la sangre que Cristo derramó en la cruz por nuestros pecados.


La segunda parte de nuestra definición respecto a experimentar a Dios es el ser movidos por él. El movimiento de Dios en el alma del hombre es una función del Espíritu Santo. Desde el comienzo de la creación, cuando el Espíritu de Dios "se movía sobre la faz de las aguas" (Génesis 1:2), hasta el movimiento del Espíritu Santo en los corazones de los incrédulos, llevándolos a Cristo, el Espíritu está activamente involucrado moviéndose en nuestras vidas. Somos movidos por Dios desde el momento en que nos atrae a la fe (Juan 6:44); el Espíritu se mueve en nuestros corazones para convencernos de pecado y de nuestra necesidad de un salvador (Juan 16:7-9); y dentro de los creyentes, él nos dirige, guía, consuela e influye en nosotros, así como produce en nosotros el fruto del Espíritu (Gálatas 5:22-23). Además, el Espíritu movió a los autores de los 66 libros de la biblia para registrar exactamente lo que él sopló en sus mentes y corazones (2 Pedro 1:21), y a través de las escrituras, él se mueve dentro de nosotros para testificar a nuestros espíritus de que somos sus hijos (Romanos 8:16).


La tercera parte de experimentar a Dios es el proceso permanente de nuestro aprendizaje de él, volviéndonos tan íntimamente relacionados con él, que con gozo le rendimos nuestras vidas porque hemos llegado a conocerlo y a confiar completamente en él. Esto implica llegar a entender que él es fiel, bueno, santo, justo, inmutable, omnipotente y soberano en todas las circunstancias. Una parte de mucho gozo respecto a experimentar a Dios, es el conocimiento íntimo de su amor. La biblia nos dice que "Dios es amor" (1 Juan 4:8, énfasis añadido). Mientras experimentamos su amor, podemos comenzar a compartir nuestro amor cristiano con los demás, independientemente de las circunstancias, y esto, a su vez, producirá más y más amor en la medida que otros experimenten su amor a través de nosotros.


Entonces, la clave para experimentar a Dios no es esperar una "experiencia" o una elevación emocional. Más bien, se trata de un proceso permanente de pertenecer a él a través de Cristo, siendo movidos por el Espíritu Santo que nos santifica, y creciendo en el conocimiento de él.




06/26/20  ADDITIONAL LESSON


Never doubt your salvation!


“Is it possible for a person's name to be erased from the Book of Life?"


Revelation 22:19 says, “And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book” (KJV). This verse is usually involved in the debate concerning eternal security. Does Revelation 22:19 mean that, after a person’s name is written in the Lamb’s Book of Life, it can at some time in the future be erased? In other words, can a Christian lose his salvation?


First, Scripture is clear that a true believer is kept secure by the power of God, sealed for the day of redemption (Ephesians 4:30), and of all those whom the Father has given to the Son, He will lose none of them (John 6:39). The Lord Jesus Christ proclaimed, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father's hand” (John 10:28–29b). Salvation is God’s work, not ours (Titus 3:5), and it is His power that keeps us.


If the “anyone” referred to in Revelation 22:19 are not believers, who are they? In other words, who might want to either add to or take away from the words of the Bible? Most likely, this tampering with God’s Word would be done not by true believers but by those who only profess to be Christians and who suppose that their names are in the Book of Life. Generally speaking, the two main groups who have traditionally tampered with the God’s revelation are pseudo-Christian cults and those who hold to very liberal theological beliefs. Many cults and theological liberals claim the name of Christ as their own, but they are not “born again”—the definitive biblical term for a Christian.


The Bible cites several examples of those who thought they were believers, but whose profession was proven to be false. In John 15, Jesus refers to them as branches that did not remain in Him, the true Vine, and therefore did not produce any fruit. We know they are false because “by their fruits you shall know them” (Matthew 7:16, 20); true disciples will exhibit the fruit of the Holy Spirit who resides within them (Galatians 5:22). In 2 Peter 2:22, false professors are dogs returning to their own vomit and a sow who “after washing herself returns to wallow in the mire” (ESV). 


The barren branch, the dog, and the pig are all symbols of those who profess to have salvation, but who have nothing more than their own righteousness to rely upon, not the righteousness of Christ that truly saves. It is doubtful that those who have repented of their sin and been born again would willingly tamper with God’s Word in this way—adding to it or taking from it. Purposefully corrupting God’s Word reveals a lack of faith.


There is another important consideration about the meaning of Revelation 22:19, and it involves translation. No early Greek manuscript even mentions the “book of life”; instead, every Greek manuscript has “tree of life.” Here is how Revelation 22:19 reads in the NIV: “If anyone takes words away from this scroll of prophecy, God will take away from that person any share in the tree of life and in the Holy City, which are described in this scroll.” Other translations with “tree” instead of “book” are the NASB, ESV, NLT, HCSB, ISV, NET, and ASV, among others. The KJV stands nearly alone in translating it as the “book” of life. 


The error arose when Erasmus, in compiling his Greek text, was forced to translate the last six verses of Revelation from the Latin Vulgate into Greek. The “tree” became a “book” because a scribe had accidentally replaced the Latin lingo (“tree”) with libro (“book”). All translations that follow the Textus Receptus, such as the KJV, thus incorrectly say “book” instead of “tree” of life.


Arguing for the “tree of life” translation instead of the “book of life” translation are two other verses in the same chapter: Revelation 22:2 and 14. Both mention the “tree of life” and the “city” together, the same as verse 19 does. Also, the word portion or share is significant. The one who corrupts the Word of God will be deprived of access to the tree of life, despite whatever claim he thinks he has to that fruit.


Revelation 3:5 is another verse that impacts this issue. “He who overcomes . . . I will never blot out his name from the book of life.” The “overcomer” mentioned in this letter to Sardis is the Christian. Compare this with 1 John 5:4: “Everyone who is born of God overcomes the world.” And verse 5: “Who is he that overcomes the world? Only he who believes that Jesus is the Son of God.” (See also 1 John 2:13.) All believers are “overcomers” in that they have been granted victory over the sin and unbelief of the world.


Some people see in Revelation 3:5 the picture of God’s pen poised, ready to strike out the name of any Christian who sins. They read into it something like this: “If you mess up and don’t win the victory, then you’re going to lose your salvation! In fact, I will erase your name from the Book of Life!” But this is NOT what the verse says. Jesus is giving a promise here, not a warning.


Never does Scripture say that God erases a believer’s name from the Lamb's Book of Life—there is never even a warning that He is contemplating it! The wonderful promise of Revelation 3:5 is that Jesus will NOT erase one’s name. Speaking to the “overcomers”—all those redeemed by the blood of the Lamb—Jesus gives His word that He will not delete their names. He affirms that, once a name is there, it is there forever. This is based on the faithfulness of God.


The promise of Revelation 3:5 is directed to believers, who are secure in their salvation. In contrast, the warning of Revelation 22:19 is directed to unbelievers, who, rather than change their hearts toward God, attempt to change God’s Word to suit themselves. Such people will not eat of the tree of life.


Never doubt your salvation!




Nunca dudes tu salvación!


“¿Es posible que el nombre de una persona sea borrado del Libro de la Vida?"



Apocalipsis 22:19 dice, “Y si alguno quitare de las palabras del libro de esta profecía, Dios quitará su parte del libro de la vida, y de la santa ciudad y de las cosas que están escritas en este libro.” Este verso generalmente forma parte del debate concerniente a la seguridad eterna. ¿Apocalipsis 22:19 significa que, después de que el nombre de una persona es escrito en el Libro de la Vida del Cordero, puede en algún momento ser borrado en el futuro? En otras palabras ¿puede un cristiano perder su salvación? 


En primer lugar, la Escritura es clara en que la seguridad de un verdadero creyente es mantenida por el poder de Dios, sellado para el día de la redención (Efesios 4:30), y de todos aquellos que el Padre le ha dado al Hijo, Él no perderá a ninguno (Juan 6:39). El Señor Jesucristo proclamó, “y yo les doy vida eterna; y no perecerán jamás, ni nadie las arrebatará de mi mano. Mi Padre que me las dio, es mayor que todos, y nadie las puede arrebatar de la mano de mi Padre.” (Juan 10:28-29). La salvación es obra de Dios, no nuestra (Tito 3:5), y es Su poder el que nos guarda. 


Si el “alguno” al que se refiere Apocalipsis 22:19 no son creyentes, entonces ¿quiénes son? En otras palabras, ¿quién podría querer añadir o quitar palabras de la Biblia? Es muy probable que esta alteración de la Palabra de Dios sería hecha, no por verdaderos creyentes, sino por aquellos que solo profesan ser cristianos, y quienes suponen que sus nombres están en el Libro de la Vida. 


Hablando en términos generales, los dos principales grupos que tradicionalmente han alterado el Apocalipsis, son las sectas pseudo-cristianas, y aquellos que se apoyan en creencias teológicas muy liberales. Muchas sectas y teólogos liberales, proclaman el nombre de Cristo como propio, pero no son nacidos de nuevo – que es el término bíblico definitivo para un cristiano. 


La Biblia cita varios ejemplos de aquellos que pensaron que eran creyentes, pero cuya profesión probó ser falsa. En Juan 15, Jesús se refiere a ellos como pámpanos que no permanecen en Él, la Vid verdadera, y por lo tanto, no producen fruto alguno. Sabemos que son falsos porque “por sus frutos los conoceréis.” (Mateo 7:16, 20). 


Los verdaderos discípulos exhibirán el fruto del Espíritu Santo que mora en ellos (Gálatas 5:22). En 2 Pedro 2:22, los falsos maestros son como perros que vuelven a su vómito y como la “puerca lavada que vuelve a revolcarse en el cieno.” La rama seca, el perro, y el cerdo, son todos símbolos de aquellos que profesan tener la salvación, pero que no tienen más que su propia justicia en qué apoyarse, no en la justicia de Cristo que es la que realmente salva. 


Es difícil que aquellos que se han arrepentido de sus pecados y han nacido de nuevo, estuvieran dispuestos a alterar la Palabra de Dios de esta manera – añadiéndole o quitando de ella. Desde luego, reconocemos que gente buena ha tenido sinceras diferencias en el área de la crítica textual. Pero puede ser demostrado, que tanto sectarios como liberales, repetidamente han hecho ambas cosas - “añadir” y “quitar” palabras. 


Por tanto, podemos entender la advertencia de Dios en Apocalipsis 22:19 de esta manera: cualquiera que manipule este mensaje crucial, encontrará que Dios no escribió su nombre en el Libro de la Vida, se le negará el acceso a la Ciudad Santa, y perderá cualquier expectativa de las cosas buenas que Él promete a Sus santos en este libro. 


Desde un punto de vista puramente lógico, ¿por qué un Dios soberano y omnisciente – quien desde el principio sabe lo que acontecerá (Isaías 46:10) – escribiría un nombre en el Libro de la Vida, sabiendo que tendrá que borrarlo cuando esa persona eventualmente apostate y niegue la fe? 


Además, leyendo esta advertencia dentro del contexto del párrafo en el cual aparece (Apocalipsis 22:6-19), claramente muestra que Dios permanece consistente: solo aquellos que han tomado en cuenta Sus advertencias, se han arrepentido, y han nacido de nuevo, tendrán toda buena expectativa futura en la eternidad. Todos los demás, tristemente, tienen un terrible y aterrador futuro esperándolos. 


Apocalipsis 3:5 es otro verso que impacta este hecho. “El que venciere…. no borraré su nombre del libro de la vida.” El “vencedor” mencionado en esta carta a Sardis es el cristiano. Comparen esto con 1 Juan 5:4: “Porque todo el que es nacido de Dios vence al mundo.” Y el verso 5: “¿Quién es el que vence al mundo, sino el que cree que Jesús es el Hijo de Dios?” (Ver también 1 Juan 2:13) Todos los creyentes son “vencedores” en que se les ha dado la victoria sobre el pecado y la incredulidad del mundo. 


Algunas personas ven en Apocalipsis 3:5 e imaginan la pluma de Dios preparada, lista para tachar el nombre de cualquier cristiano que peca. Ellos leen aquí algo como: -“¡Si fracasas y no ganas la victoria, entonces vas a perder tu salvación! ¡De hecho, borraré tu nombre del Libro de la Vida!”- Pero esto NO es lo que dice el verso. Jesús está dando aquí una promesa, no una advertencia. 


La Escritura nunca dice que Dios borra el nombre de un creyente del Libro de la Vida. ¡No hay siquiera una advertencia de que Él lo esté contemplando! La maravillosa promesa de Apocalipsis 3:5 es que Jesús NO borrará el nombre de uno. Hablando a los “vencedores” – todos aquellos redimidos por la sangre del Cordero – Jesús les da Su palabra, de que no borrará sus nombres. Él afirma que una vez que un nombre está ahí, se quedará ahí para siempre. Esto está basado en la fidelidad de Dios. 


La promesa de Apocalipsis 3:5 

El que venciere será vestido de vestiduras blancas; y no borraré su nombre del libro de la vida, y confesaré su nombre delante de mi Padre, y delante de sus ángeles.


está dirigida a los creyentes, que están seguros en su salvación. En contraste, la advertencia de Apocalipsis 22:19 


Apocalipsis 22:19

Y si alguno quitare de las palabras del libro de esta profecía, Dios quitará su parte del libro de la vida, y de la santa ciudad, y de las cosas que están escritas en este libro. 


está dirigida a los no creyentes, quienes, en vez de cambiar sus corazones hacia Dios, intentan cambiar la Palabra de Dios a su conveniencia.



Nunca dudes tu salvación!



Comments